Texas Rangers Ride Again


1h 8m 1940

Film Details

Also Known As
Texas!
Release Date
Dec 13, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Mesa, Arizona, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

Ellen Dangerfield returns to her grandparents' ranch in Texas after a ten-year absence when her widowed grandmother Cecilia Dangerfield loses three thousand head of cattle to rustlers. Fed up with her grandson Carter's unwillingness to track down the thieves, Cecilia appeals to her old beau, Ben Caldwalder, of the Texas Rangers, for help. To infiltrate the rustlers, Ranger Jim Kingston poses as an outlaw known as the Pecos Kid and is hired by Joe Yuma, who owns the packing company. There, Jim learns that Joe has been slaughtering Dangerfield cattle and disposing their carcasses in a lime pit. With his partner, Mace Townsley, Jim sets out to learn who else is involved in the syndicate. When Palo Pete, one of Yuma's henchmen, tries to frame Jim for the murder of ranch hand Jake Porter, Ellen returns to her tomboyish ways and takes up her rifle to defend the ranch hands. That night, Yuma and his men slaughter more cattle on the ranch, and after dismantling their operation, take a convoy of trucks to the Portos Packing Company. Mace manages to send a message to the Rangers, and they apprehend Carter, who has been involved with the rustlers all along. Jim returns to the ranch to get Carter's address book when Yuma and his men attack the Dangerfield house. As Ellen, Jim, Ben and Cecilia return the rustlers' fire, the Dangerfields' Mexican servant, Mio Pio, risks his life to get more ammunition. After the Rangers arrive to apprehend the rustlers, Jim and Ellen plan to wed and Ben orders Cecilia to marry him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Texas!
Release Date
Dec 13, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Mesa, Arizona, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Articles

Ellen Drew, 1914-2003


Ellen Drew, a talented leading lady who was adept at handling light comedy or noirish thrillers, died of liver failure at her home on December 3rd in Palm Desert, California. She was 89.

She was born Esther Loretta "Terry" Ray on November 23, 1914, in Kansas City, Missouri. The daughter of a barber, her family moved to Chicago when she was still an infant and she lived a very quiet childhood far removed from the glamour of Hollywood. She was encouraged by some friends to enter a beauty contest when she was just 17. After winning, she tried her luck in Hollywood, but found that they were no immediate offers for her particular talents.

She eventually took a waitressing job at C.C. Brown's, a famed Hollywood Boulevard soda fountain, and had virtually abandoned her dreams as a starlet when William Demarest, a popular actor's agent and well-known character actor, spotted her. Demarest arranged a screen test for her at Paramount, and she was promptly placed under contract for $50 a week.

For the first few years, (1936-38), Drew got only bit parts, and was often uncredited. When she finally got prominent billing in the Bing Crosby musical Sing You Sinners (1938), she decided to change her name, from Terry Ray to Ellen Drew. She earned her first major role in Frank Lloyd's If I Were King (1938) opposite Ronald Colman, yet for the most part of her career, rarely rose above "B" material and second leads. Still, she had some fine exceptions: Preston Sturges' enchanting comedy Christmas in July (1940), with Dick Powell; Tay Garnett's lighthearted war romp My Favorite Spy (1942) co-starring Kay Kyser; Julien Duvivier's taut The Imposter (1944), holding her own with a brooding Jean Gabin; and Mark Robson's chilling low-budget chiller Isle of the Dead (1945) opposite Boris Karloff. Drew made some notable television appearances in the late '50s including Perry Mason and The Barbara Stanwyck Show, before retiring from the entertainment industry. She is survived by her son David; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Ellen Drew, 1914-2003

Ellen Drew, 1914-2003

Ellen Drew, a talented leading lady who was adept at handling light comedy or noirish thrillers, died of liver failure at her home on December 3rd in Palm Desert, California. She was 89. She was born Esther Loretta "Terry" Ray on November 23, 1914, in Kansas City, Missouri. The daughter of a barber, her family moved to Chicago when she was still an infant and she lived a very quiet childhood far removed from the glamour of Hollywood. She was encouraged by some friends to enter a beauty contest when she was just 17. After winning, she tried her luck in Hollywood, but found that they were no immediate offers for her particular talents. She eventually took a waitressing job at C.C. Brown's, a famed Hollywood Boulevard soda fountain, and had virtually abandoned her dreams as a starlet when William Demarest, a popular actor's agent and well-known character actor, spotted her. Demarest arranged a screen test for her at Paramount, and she was promptly placed under contract for $50 a week. For the first few years, (1936-38), Drew got only bit parts, and was often uncredited. When she finally got prominent billing in the Bing Crosby musical Sing You Sinners (1938), she decided to change her name, from Terry Ray to Ellen Drew. She earned her first major role in Frank Lloyd's If I Were King (1938) opposite Ronald Colman, yet for the most part of her career, rarely rose above "B" material and second leads. Still, she had some fine exceptions: Preston Sturges' enchanting comedy Christmas in July (1940), with Dick Powell; Tay Garnett's lighthearted war romp My Favorite Spy (1942) co-starring Kay Kyser; Julien Duvivier's taut The Imposter (1944), holding her own with a brooding Jean Gabin; and Mark Robson's chilling low-budget chiller Isle of the Dead (1945) opposite Boris Karloff. Drew made some notable television appearances in the late '50s including Perry Mason and The Barbara Stanwyck Show, before retiring from the entertainment industry. She is survived by her son David; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this picture was Texas!, and it was partially filmed on location in Mesa, AZ. According to a Hollywood Reporter production chart, Harold Hurley was to have produced this film, but his participation in the project is unconfirmed. An unidentified contemporary source adds that Irving Talbot was scheduled to conduct John Leipold's score for this film, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Modern sources add Charles Lane, Jack Perrin, Gordon Jones, Ruth Rodgers, John "Skins" Miller and Henry Rocquemore to the cast.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1941

Released in United States 1941