The Stripper


1h 35m 1963

Brief Synopsis

Lila Green is an insecure and aging showgirl for Madame Olga's stage shows. When her boyfriend, Rick, runs off with the shows money, Madame Olga and Ronny let Lila go. Lila goes to stay with her old neighbours, Helen Bard and her teenage son, Kenny. Lila decides to go out and get a regular job and try and live a normal life. All seem well until, Lila and Kenny stop fighting their attraction for one another.

Film Details

Also Known As
A Woman in July, Celebration
Release Date
Jan 1963
Premiere Information
New York opening: 19 Jun 1963
Production Company
Jerry Wald Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play A Loss of Roses by William Inge (New York, 28 Nov 1959).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

After failing to make a successful career as a dancer in movies, Lila Green joins a second-rate vaudeville act. When the show arrives in the small Kansas town where Lila spent part of her childhood, Ricky Powers, the troupe's manager and Lila's lover, skips town with their money, and Lila moves in with an old friend, Helen Baird, and her young son, Kenny. The ardent but inexperienced Kenny becomes so attracted to Lila that he breaks off with his teenaged girl friend and asks Lila to marry him. Lila's happiness is shattered when she realizes that Kenny's promises are a result of youthful infatuation. Ricky returns to offer Lila a job--performing a striptease at a stag show--and she reluctantly agrees to do the act. Kenny watches the performance and becomes so disgusted with what Lila has been reduced to that he once more proposes. She refuses, however, knowing that their marriage would never work, and she decides also to forego her career to make a new life for herself.

Film Details

Also Known As
A Woman in July, Celebration
Release Date
Jan 1963
Premiere Information
New York opening: 19 Jun 1963
Production Company
Jerry Wald Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play A Loss of Roses by William Inge (New York, 28 Nov 1959).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Costume Design

1963

Articles

Louis Nye (1913-2005)


"Hi-Ho, Steverino," was the catchphrase uttered by Gordon Hathaway, the fey, rich snob who greeted Steve Allen during the golden age of television. The man behind it all was Louis Nye, a fine character comedian who for the past 50 years had been a unique, lively presence in film and television. Sadly, Nye passed away on October 9 after a long battle with lung cancer at his Los Angeles home. He was 92.

Nye was born on May 1, 1913, in Hartford, Connecticut to Russian immigrants. He began his career in theater in his native Hartford before moving to New York City to break into radio. After a stint in the Army during World War II, Nye returned to find a new medium dawning, television. His start was inauspicious, just a few appearances on the Cavalcade of Stars, but little did he realize that when he was picked up for The Steve Allen Show in 1956 that he, along with other talented comedians like Don Knotts, Tom Poston and Bill Dana, were courting stardom. The program was one of the first sketch series to take off on television. It was justly celebrated for the wacky characterizations that the cast invented, and Nye's Gordon Hathaway was no exception. Sure, his take on the country club elite was a touch prissy and effete, but Nye injected Gordon with a raffish charm and child-like sensibilty that never made the character offensive. If anything, Gordon Hathaway was endearing.

His stint on Steve Allen opened up the movie offers, the first of which, the garish Mamie Van Doren vehicle Sex Kittens Go to College (1960), was not exactly a highpoint in cinema comedy, but he soon settled into some good supporting parts in a slew of films: The Facts of Life (1960), The Last Time I Saw Archie (his best film role, a terrrific comic foil for Robert Mitchum, 1961), The Wheeler Dealers, Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed? (both 1963), Good Neighbor Sam (another great part as an inept detective, 1964), and A Guide for the Married Man (1967).

Nye's career cooled in the '70s, with an occasional television appearance (Laverne & Shirley, Fantasy Island) and mediocre flicks (Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), Harper Valley P.T.A. (1978). Eventually, he found solace in voice work for many animated shows, the most popular of them being his long run on Inspector Gadget (1985-99). Still, just when you thought he was out of the limelight, he returned as a semi-regular in the critically acclaimed HBO comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm where for two seasons (2000-2002), he was hilarious as comic Jeff Garlin's sardonic father. Give Mr. Nye his due, he left the stage near the top of his game. He is survived by his wife, Anita; and a son, Peter.

by Michael T. Toole
Louis Nye (1913-2005)

Louis Nye (1913-2005)

"Hi-Ho, Steverino," was the catchphrase uttered by Gordon Hathaway, the fey, rich snob who greeted Steve Allen during the golden age of television. The man behind it all was Louis Nye, a fine character comedian who for the past 50 years had been a unique, lively presence in film and television. Sadly, Nye passed away on October 9 after a long battle with lung cancer at his Los Angeles home. He was 92. Nye was born on May 1, 1913, in Hartford, Connecticut to Russian immigrants. He began his career in theater in his native Hartford before moving to New York City to break into radio. After a stint in the Army during World War II, Nye returned to find a new medium dawning, television. His start was inauspicious, just a few appearances on the Cavalcade of Stars, but little did he realize that when he was picked up for The Steve Allen Show in 1956 that he, along with other talented comedians like Don Knotts, Tom Poston and Bill Dana, were courting stardom. The program was one of the first sketch series to take off on television. It was justly celebrated for the wacky characterizations that the cast invented, and Nye's Gordon Hathaway was no exception. Sure, his take on the country club elite was a touch prissy and effete, but Nye injected Gordon with a raffish charm and child-like sensibilty that never made the character offensive. If anything, Gordon Hathaway was endearing. His stint on Steve Allen opened up the movie offers, the first of which, the garish Mamie Van Doren vehicle Sex Kittens Go to College (1960), was not exactly a highpoint in cinema comedy, but he soon settled into some good supporting parts in a slew of films: The Facts of Life (1960), The Last Time I Saw Archie (his best film role, a terrrific comic foil for Robert Mitchum, 1961), The Wheeler Dealers, Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed? (both 1963), Good Neighbor Sam (another great part as an inept detective, 1964), and A Guide for the Married Man (1967). Nye's career cooled in the '70s, with an occasional television appearance (Laverne & Shirley, Fantasy Island) and mediocre flicks (Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood (1976), Harper Valley P.T.A. (1978). Eventually, he found solace in voice work for many animated shows, the most popular of them being his long run on Inspector Gadget (1985-99). Still, just when you thought he was out of the limelight, he returned as a semi-regular in the critically acclaimed HBO comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm where for two seasons (2000-2002), he was hilarious as comic Jeff Garlin's sardonic father. Give Mr. Nye his due, he left the stage near the top of his game. He is survived by his wife, Anita; and a son, Peter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Hey Lila! When I was a kid, did you used to kiss me goodnight?
- Kenny
You're not a kid anymore.
- Lila Green
You kissed me last night.
- Kenny
Like I was your big sister!
- Lila Green
I don't need you, Ricky, because someone has just shown me that he cares enough about me to make me care about myself. I've got me and me can take me wherever me wants to go!
- Lila Green

Trivia

Notes

Working titles: Celebration and A Woman in July.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 1963

Franklin Shaffner's feature directorial debut.

CinemaScope

Released in United States Summer June 1963