Stars & Bars


1h 34m 1988

Brief Synopsis

A young Englishman travels to Georgia to try to convince a man to sell him a long-lost painting by the artist Renoir.

Film Details

Also Known As
Un señorito en Nueva York
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Russell Blackmon
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Helen, Georgia, USA; Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Clarkesville, Georgia, USA; Tallapoosa, Georgia, USA; Crawfordsville, Georgia, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m

Synopsis

A young Englishman travels to Georgia to try to convince a man to sell him a long-lost painting by the artist Renoir.

Crew

Paul Adler

Casting Associate

Kevin Ahern

Assistant Editor

Lee America

Lighting

Rick Anderson

Electrician

David Appleby

Photography

Bonnie Arnold

Production Supervisor

Paula Squires Asaff

Script Supervisor

Campbell Askew

Sound Editor

Steve Baigelman

Location Assistant

Lynn Barber

Makeup Supervisor

Ray Bastonero

Driver

Jeff Becker

Driver

Michael Lee Benson

On-Set Dresser

Norman Bielowicz

Assistant

Russell Blackmon

Cable Operator

Jan Blasingame

Craft Service

Becky Block

Art Director

William Boyd

Source Material (From Novel)

William Boyd

Screenplay

Michael Bradsell

Editor

Risa Bramon Garcia

Casting

J. C. Brotherhood

Special Effects

Scott G Brown

Carpenter

Jayne Browning

Other

Julia Burr

Props

Chris Cardyasz

Set Decorator

Suzanne Carter

Other

Ron Chambley

Driver

Colin Chapman

Dialogue Editor

Christie Christl

Accounting Assistant

Russell Coker

Driver

Kirk Corwin

Property Master

Stuart Craig

Production Designer

Shirley Fulton Crumley

Casting

Carol Cuddy

Production Supervisor

Jack Cummins

Unit Production Manager

Jack Cummins

Associate Producer

Michael Curry

Construction Coordinator

Mark Davison

Assistant Camera Operator

Peter Deming

Camera Operator

Chris Dibble

Music

Leslie Dilley

Production Designer

Phil Dillon

Electrician

Liz Dixon

Dialogue Coach

Ned Dowd

Assistant Director

Mike Dowson

Sound

Bobby Earnhardt

Electrician

Sally Friedman

Other

Sue Gandy

Costume Department

Gershon Ginsburg

On-Set Dresser

Nate Goodman

Assistant Camera Operator

Brian Gunter

Electrician

Greg Hardin

Carpenter

Catherine Hayes-kilzer

Other

Mark Heffernan

Production Assistant

John Heller

Photography

Fred T Holloway

Assistant

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Joyce Hudson

Casting Associate

Carole Hughes

On-Set Dresser

Kevin Hyman

Production Accountant

Philip Ivey

Hair

David Elliot Jennings

Carpenter

George Jones

Song Performer

Herb Jones

Driver

Steve Jones

Driver

Chris Kelly

Music Editor

James E Kelly

Grip

Robert Kempf

Key Grip

Bryant Knight

Assistant

John Kollock

Assistant

Katherine Kollock

Assistant

Anne Kuljian

Set Decorator

Tony Kupersmith

Construction Coordinator

Verlie Lawson

Driver

Harry Leavey

Other

Heidi Levitt

Casting Associate

Sandy Lieberson

Producer

Doug Loggins

Driver

Carey Lollock

Production Assistant

Tom Luse

Location Manager

Leslie Lykes

Art Department Coordinator

Jerry Lyles

Transportation Captain

Donna Maloney

Wardrobe

Cherylanne Martin

Assistant Director

W Scott Mason

Foreman

Gerald Mccann

Sound Editor

Larry Mcconkey

Steadicam Operator

Kathryn J. Mcdermott

Production Coordinator

Catherine M Mcdonald

Production Assistant

Roseann Milano

Wardrobe Supervisor

Ooty Moorehead

Production Coordinator

Charlene Murray

Production Assistant

Stanley Myers

Music

Christine Needham

Other

Andy Nelson

Sound

Nick Nelson

Carpenter

Ray Nevin

Transportation Coordinator

David O'connell

Electrician

Gary Oldknow

Grip

Paul Oliver

Other

Javier Orce

Wardrobe

Bill Pappas

On-Set Dresser

Graham Presckett

Original Music

John Patrick Pritchett

Sound

Kathy Quattrochi

Animal Trainer

Michael Quattrochi

Animal Trainer

Susan Richards

Coproducer

Dennis Richardson

Carpenter

George Richey

Song

Angela Riserbato

Carpenter

Teddy Ritchie

Driver

Steve Rose

Location Manager

Ann Roth

Costume Designer

Donna Santora

Accounting Assistant

Hamilton Schwartz

Production Assistant

Marciann Shapiro

Wardrobe Assistant

Susan Shopmaker

Casting

Sheldon Shrager

Executive Producer

Joel Shryack

Boom Operator

Bob Shuford

Electrician

David Sinrich

Grip

Lonnie Smith

Stunt Coordinator

Neil Spisak

Assistant

Sting

Song Performer

Sting

Song

Elliott Street

Dialogue Coach

Graham Sutton

Assistant Editor

Sean Swint

Production Assistant

Greg Torre

Location Assistant

Nicole Torre

Carpenter

Fiachra Trench

Original Music

Stan Vaughan

Dolly Grip

Edwin H Walker

Hair Assistant

Edwin H Walker

Makeup Assistant

Oranz L Walker

Production Assistant

Jonathan M. Watson

Production Assistant

Julie Watts

Production Coordinator

Daniel R Webster

Assistant Art Director

Laura West

Props

Rick A West

Gaffer

Kerry Wickham

Production Assistant

Norris Wilson

Song

Tony Wright

Props

Henry Wyndham

Assistant

Teresa M. Yarbrough

Production Coordinator

Jerzy Zielinski

Director Of Photography

Film Details

Also Known As
Un señorito en Nueva York
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Russell Blackmon
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Helen, Georgia, USA; Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Clarkesville, Georgia, USA; Tallapoosa, Georgia, USA; Crawfordsville, Georgia, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m

Articles

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole
Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1988

Released in United States on Video November 2, 1988

Released in United States Spring March 18, 1988

Re-released in United States on Video February 16, 1994

Shown at Birmingham Film & Television Festival September-October 1988.

Shown at Munich Film Festival June 25-July 3, 1988.

Began shooting March 16, 1987.

Completed shooting May 14, 1987.

Released in United States 1988 (Shown at Birmingham Film & Television Festival September-October 1988.)

Released in United States 1988 (Shown at Munich Film Festival June 25-July 3, 1988.)

Re-released in United States on Video February 16, 1994

Released in United States on Video November 2, 1988

Released in United States Spring March 18, 1988