Star Trek: The Motion Picture


2h 12m 1979

Brief Synopsis

Captain Kirk reassembles his old crew on the newly refit Starship Enterprise and is sent out to investigate a mysterious cloud-like entity.

Film Details

Also Known As
Star Trek, le film, Star Trek: The Motion Picture - The Director's Edition
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
Jan 1979
Premiere Information
New York opening: 8 Dec 1979; Los Angeles opening: 10 Dec 1979
Production Company
Century Associates
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 12m
Sound
Dolby
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Captain James T. Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise take to the skies for this big-budget film based on the beloved sc-fi TV series. Years after Kirk completed his missions for Starfleet, the Enterprise is pulled out of mothballs to intercept a destructive alien force destroying everything in its path.

Crew

Dick Alexander

Mechanical Design

Isaac Asimov

Special Science Consultant

Don Baker

Miniature Effects Photography

Charles Barbee

Special Effects Photography

Philip Barberio

Camera Operator

David Bartholomew

Effects Photography

Deborah Baxter

Special Effects Assistant

Lisze Bechtold

Graphics

Lisze Bechtold

Animator

Thane Berti

Special Effects Photography

Albert Bettcher

Camera Operator

Cosmas Bolger

Special Effects Photography

Martin Bresin

Special Mechanical Effects

Deena Buckett

Animator

Deena Buckett

Graphics

Glenn Campbell

Special Effects Photography

Merllyn Ching

Animator

Merllyn Ching

Graphics

Elrene Cowan

Animator

Elrene Cowan

Graphics

Don Cox

Camera Operator

Tom Cranham

Production Illustrator

Linda Descenna

Set Decorator

Angela A Diamos

Animator

Angela A Diamos

Graphics

James R Dickson

Additional Photography

Cy Didjurgis

Graphics

Cy Didjurgis

Animator

Dennis Dorney

Special Effects Photography

Roger Dorney

Optical Photography Supervisor

Janet Dykstra

Special Effects Assistant

John Dykstra

Special Effects Photography Director

Douglas Eby

Camera Operator

Leslie Ekker

Graphics

Leslie Ekker

Animator

John Ellis

Camera Operator

Robert Elswit

Special Effects Photography

Scott Farrar

Special Effects Photography

David Fein

Producer (Director'S Edition)

David C Fine

Producer (2000 "Director'S Edition")

Robert Fletcher

Costumes

Alan Dean Foster

From Story ("In Thy Image")

Robert Friedstand

Special Effects Photography

Ernest Garza

Visual Consultant

Bruno George

Special Effects Photography

Chris George

Special Effects Photography

Rocco Gioffre

Additional Matte Artist

Leora Glass

Special Effects Assistant

Philip Golden

Special Effects Assistant

Jerry Goldsmith

Music

Phil Gonzales

Special Effects Photography

Suzanne Gordon

Publicist

Abbot Grafton

Optical Consultant

Michael Greene

Camera Assistant

Michael Greene

Camera Assistant

Alan Gundelfinger

Optical Consultant

David Hardberger

Camera Operator

Alan Harding

Camera Operator

Leon R Harris

Art Direction

Linda Harris

Graphics

Linda Harris

Animator

Jack Hinkle

Effects Photography Editor

Richard Hollander

Special Electronic Mechanical Design

Robert Hollister

Special Effects Photography

John James

Effects Photography (Project Manager)

Don Jarel

Camera Operator

Joseph R Jennings

Art Direction

Jack Johnson

Production Illustrator

Proctor Jones

Special Effects Assistant

Nicola Kaftan

Graphics

Nicola Kaftan

Animator

Denny Kelly

Effects Photography

John Kimball

Graphics

John Kimball

Animator

Greg Kimle

Special Effects Photography

Steve Klein

Effects Photography

Martin A Kline

Production

Richard Kline

Director Of Photography

Tom Koester

Animator

Tom Koester

Graphics

Milt Laiken

Optical Consultant

Lin Law

Camera Operator

Michael Lawler

Special Effects Photography

Deirdre Leblanc

Graphics

Deirdre Leblanc

Animator

Harold Livingston

Screenwriter

Bruce Logan

Additional Photography

Brian Longbotham

Kinetic Lighting Effects

Steve Mark

Effects Photography

Guy Marsden

Visual Consultant

Clay Marsh

Camera Operator

Michael Matessino

Producer (2000 "Director'S Edition")

Ray Mattey

Special Mechanical Effects

Robert T Mccall

Production Illustrator

Robert Mccall

Production

Daniel J. Mccauley

Assistant Director

David Mccue

Camera Operator

Grant Mccune

Miniatures Supervisor

Russ Mcelhatton

Special Effects Photography

Syd Mead

Production Illustrator

Harold Michelson

Production Designer

Mike Middleton

Visual Consultant

Bill Millar

Effects Photography (Project Manager)

John Millerberg

Animator

John Millerberg

Graphics

Michael Minor

Production Illustrator

Barbara Minster

Hairstyles

Virgil Mirano

Visual Consultant

Rick Mitchell

Assistant Editor

Don Moore

Production Illustrator

Harry Moreau

Animator Effects

Linda Moreau

Animator

Linda Moreau

Graphics

Connie Morgan

Animator

Connie Morgan

Graphics

Max Morgan

Camera Operator

Erik Nash

Visual Consultant

Gerald Nash

Optical Consultant

Ron Nathan

Special Effects Photography

David J Negron

Production Illustrator

Ve Neill

Makeup

Sam Nicholson

Kinetic Lighting Effects

Paul Olsen

Graphics

Paul Olsen

Animator

Tommy Overton

Sound Mixer

Marvin Paige

Casting

Lindsley Parsons Jr.

Executive In Charge Of Production

Mike Peed

Special Effects Photography

Fred Phillips

Makeup

Janna Phillips

Makeup

John Piner

Special Effects Projectionist

George Polkinghorne

Mechanical Design

Jerry Pooler

Special Effects Photography

Bonnie Prendergast

Script Supervisor

Darrell Pritchett

Special Mechanical Effects

Andrew Probert

Production Illustrator

Todd Ramsay

Editor

Lex Rawlins

Special Effects Photography

Phil Rawlins

Unit Production Manager

Phil Rawlins

Production Manager

Gene Roddenberry

Other

Gene Roddenberry

Producer

John Rothwell

Publicist

Richard Rubin

Props

Jonathan Seay

Special Effects Photography

Dieter Seifert

Mechanical Design

Frank Serafine

Special Sound

Robert Shepherd

Effects Photography (Project Manager)

John Shourt

Production Illustrator

William Shourt

Mechanical Design

Tut Shurtleff

Special Effects Assistant

Steve Slocum

Special Effects Photography

Doug E Smith

Special Effects Photography

Robert Sordal

Key Grip

Scott Squires

Camera Operator

Dave Steward

Effects Photography

Dave Stewart

Photography

John Sullivan

Special Effects Photography

Robert Swarthe

Special Animation Effects

Michael Sweeney

Special Effects Photography

Robert Taylor

Special Visual Effects

Bob Thomas

Special Effects Photography

Randy Thornton

Assistant Editor

Mel Traxel

Stills

Don Trumbull

Mechanical Design

Douglas Trumbull

Special Effects Photography Director

John C Vallone

Art Direction

Jesco Von Puttkamer

Technical Advisor (Special Science)

Brett Webster

Special Effects Assistant

Alex Weldon

Special Mechanical Effects

Evans Wetmore

Special Electronic Mechanical Design

Charles Wheeler

Additional Photography

Greg Wilzbach

Graphics

Greg Wilzbach

Animator

Doug Wise

Assistant Director

Douglas E Wise

Assistant Director

Rob Wise

Camera Assistant

Vicki Witt

Effects Photography

Diane E Wooten

Special Effects Photography

Hoyt Yeatman

Camera Operator

Alison Yerxa

Graphics

Alison Yerxa

Animator

Matthew Yuricich

Matte Artist

Richard Yuricich

Director Of Photography

Richard Yuricich

Special Photography Effects Producer

Jon Zovill

Associate Producer

Maurice Zuberano

Production Illustrator

Film Details

Also Known As
Star Trek, le film, Star Trek: The Motion Picture - The Director's Edition
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
Jan 1979
Premiere Information
New York opening: 8 Dec 1979; Los Angeles opening: 10 Dec 1979
Production Company
Century Associates
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 12m
Sound
Dolby
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1979

Set Decoration

1980

Best Music Original Dramatic Score

1980

Best Visual Effects

1979
John Dykstra

Best Visual Effects

1979
Douglas Trumbull

Articles

Robert Wise (1914-2005)


Robert Wise, who died at age 91 on September 14, was the noted film editor of Citizen Kane (1941) and other movies before he became a producer and director, and all his works are marked by striking visual rhythms. He is best remembered for two enormously popular musicals, West Side Story (1959) and The Sound of Music (1965), which brought him a total of four Oscars® -- each winning for Best Picture and Best Director. (Wise's directorial award for West Side Story was shared with Jerome Robbins.)

Born on September 10, 1914 in Winchester, Ind., Wise was a child of the Depression who quit college to earn a living in the movie industry. He began as an assistant cutter at RKO, where he worked his way up to the position of film editor and earned an Oscar® nomination for his bravura work with Orson Welles on Citizen Kane. He also edited The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) for Welles, along with several other RKO films.

Wise became a director by default when RKO and producer Val Lewton assigned him to The Curse of the Cat People (1944) after Gunther von Fritsch failed to meet the film's production schedule. Wise turned the film into a first-rate psychological thriller, and enjoyed equal success with another Lewton horror film, The Body Snatcher (1945).

Critical praise also was showered upon Wise's Born to Kill (1947), a crime melodrama; and Blood on the Moon (1948), an unusual psychological Western starring Robert Mitchum. Even more highly regarded was The Set-Up (1949), a no-punches-pulled boxing drama that won the Critics' Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Wise moved on from RKO in the early 1950s, directing one of the movies' classic alien invasion films, The Day the Earth Stood Still, for 20th Century Fox.

At MGM he directed Executive Suite (1954), a compelling all-star boardroom drama; Somebody Up There Likes Me, a film bio of boxer Rocky Graziano that established Paul Newman as a major star; and The Haunting (1963), a chilling haunted-hause melodrama. His films for United Artists include Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), a submarine drama with Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster; I Want to Live! (1958), a harrowing account of a convicted murderess on Death Row, with Susan Hayward in her Oscar-winning performance; and the crime caper Odds Against Tomorrow (1959).

Wise served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Directors Guild of America. He was awarded the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1966, and the Directors Guild's highest honor, the D.W. Griffith Award, in 1988. He remained active as a director through the 1970s. His final film, Rooftops (1989) was a musical with an urban setting that recalled West Side Story.

The films in TCM's salute to Robert Wise are Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Curse of the Cat People (1944), The Body Snatcher (1945), Born to Kill (1947), Blood on the Moon (1948), The Set-Up (1949), Executive Suite (1954), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), B>West Side Story (1959), Odds Against Tomorrow (1959) and The Haunting (1963).

by Roger Fristoe
Robert Wise (1914-2005)

Robert Wise (1914-2005)

Robert Wise, who died at age 91 on September 14, was the noted film editor of Citizen Kane (1941) and other movies before he became a producer and director, and all his works are marked by striking visual rhythms. He is best remembered for two enormously popular musicals, West Side Story (1959) and The Sound of Music (1965), which brought him a total of four Oscars® -- each winning for Best Picture and Best Director. (Wise's directorial award for West Side Story was shared with Jerome Robbins.) Born on September 10, 1914 in Winchester, Ind., Wise was a child of the Depression who quit college to earn a living in the movie industry. He began as an assistant cutter at RKO, where he worked his way up to the position of film editor and earned an Oscar® nomination for his bravura work with Orson Welles on Citizen Kane. He also edited The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) for Welles, along with several other RKO films. Wise became a director by default when RKO and producer Val Lewton assigned him to The Curse of the Cat People (1944) after Gunther von Fritsch failed to meet the film's production schedule. Wise turned the film into a first-rate psychological thriller, and enjoyed equal success with another Lewton horror film, The Body Snatcher (1945). Critical praise also was showered upon Wise's Born to Kill (1947), a crime melodrama; and Blood on the Moon (1948), an unusual psychological Western starring Robert Mitchum. Even more highly regarded was The Set-Up (1949), a no-punches-pulled boxing drama that won the Critics' Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Wise moved on from RKO in the early 1950s, directing one of the movies' classic alien invasion films, The Day the Earth Stood Still, for 20th Century Fox. At MGM he directed Executive Suite (1954), a compelling all-star boardroom drama; Somebody Up There Likes Me, a film bio of boxer Rocky Graziano that established Paul Newman as a major star; and The Haunting (1963), a chilling haunted-hause melodrama. His films for United Artists include Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), a submarine drama with Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster; I Want to Live! (1958), a harrowing account of a convicted murderess on Death Row, with Susan Hayward in her Oscar-winning performance; and the crime caper Odds Against Tomorrow (1959). Wise served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Directors Guild of America. He was awarded the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1966, and the Directors Guild's highest honor, the D.W. Griffith Award, in 1988. He remained active as a director through the 1970s. His final film, Rooftops (1989) was a musical with an urban setting that recalled West Side Story. The films in TCM's salute to Robert Wise are Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Curse of the Cat People (1944), The Body Snatcher (1945), Born to Kill (1947), Blood on the Moon (1948), The Set-Up (1949), Executive Suite (1954), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), B>West Side Story (1959), Odds Against Tomorrow (1959) and The Haunting (1963). by Roger Fristoe

Quotes

Evaluation, Mr. Spock.
- Captain James T. Kirk
Fascinating.
- Commander Spock
It's life, Captain, but not life as we know it.
- Commander Spock
I'm sorry, Will.
- Captain James T. Kirk
No, Admiral. I don't think you're sorry. Not one damned bit. I remember when you recommended me for this command. You told me how envious you were and how much you hoped you would get a starship command again. Well sir, it looks like you found a way.
- Commander Willard Decker
Enterprise, what we got back didn't live very long... fortunately.
- Transporter chief
Well, for a man who swore he'd never return to the Starfleet...
- Captain James T. Kirk
Just a moment, Captain sir! Your revered Admiral Nogura invoked a little-known, seldom-used "reserve activation clause." In simpler language, Captain, they DRAFTED me!
- Commander Leonard 'Bones' McCoy, M.D.
They didn't!
- Captain James T. Kirk
This was your idea! This was your idea, wasn't it?
- Commander Leonard 'Bones' McCoy, M.D.
Bones, there's a... thing... out there.
- Captain James T. Kirk
Why is any object we don't understand always called "a thing"?
- Commander Leonard 'Bones' McCoy, M.D.

Trivia

After the original "Star Trek" (1966) TV series proved a success in syndication, Paramount became interested in making a "Star Trek" movie. Writers who contributed ideas or draft scripts in 1975-77 included Gene Roddenberry, Jon Povill, Robert Silverberg, John D.F. Black, Harlan Ellison, Theodore Sturgeon, and Ray Bradbury. A story called "Star Trek: Planet of Titans" was selected; 'Bryant, Chris' and Allan Scott (II) wrote a script, which was then rewritten by 'Kaufman, Philip' . At this point Star Wars (1977) burst upon the world, and Paramount reacted by canceling "Star Trek: Planet of Titans" before pre-production started. Allegedly they thought there wasn't a sufficient market for another big science-fiction film.

Paramount then announced that they would be creating a new TV network, initially operating one night a week showing Paramount TV-movies and a new "Star Trek" series about the Enterprise's second 5-year mission, with most of the original cast and the title "Star Trek Phase II". It soon became clear that they could not make a go of the new network, but Paramount continued work on the new series in the hope of selling it to one of the existing networks.

For a previous unproduced TV series of his called "Genesis II", Roddenberry had created a story he called "Robot's Return". This was now rewritten for "Star Trek" by Alan Dean Foster under the title "In Thy Image", and proposed as the 2-hour premiere episode of "Star Trek Phase II". However, Paramount executive Michael Eisner responded, "We've been looking for the feature for five years and this is it", and made the final decision to forget the new series and produce the story as a movie.

The decision was made in August 1977, but in order to keep the team together during the necessary renegotiation of contracts, Paramount kept it secret until March 1978; when Rona Barrett broke the secret in December 1977, they denied it. Meanwhile, they pretended that the TV series was still going to happen, even soliciting scripts for episodes that would never be made. Sets built for the TV series were used in the movie, but modelwork had to be redone after the changeover was made public, due to the need for finer detailing in a movie.

TV director Robert Collins was hired to direct the 2-hour premiere, but after the change to a movie, Paramount wanted a more experienced director and replaced him with 'Wise, Robert' .

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States September 7, 1991 (Shown back-to-back with "Star Trek" sequels II-V in 44 US cities on September 7, 1991, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the television series.)

Released in United States Winter December 7, 1979

Re-released in United States on Video July 25, 1991

Released in United States September 7, 1991

The DVD-released 2000 "Director's Edition" features a new, fine-tuned edit approved by director Robert Wise and several redone special effects.

Released in USA on video.

Began shooting August 1978.

Released in United States Winter December 7, 1979

Re-released in United States on Video July 25, 1991