Square Dance Jubilee


1h 19m 1949

Brief Synopsis

Two talent scouts for a New York-based country music TV show called "Square Dance Jubilee" are sent out West to get authentic western singing acts. They find what they're looking for, but also get mixed up in cattle rustling and murder.

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 11, 1949
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Lippert Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Screen Guild Productions, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 19m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,087ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

In New York, television executive G. K. signs Spade Cooley and his band to a fifty-two week contract, but as he needs other Western acts to support him, gives talent scouts Don Blake and Sam "Seldom" Jenks two weeks to find more performers. After buying themselves dude Western outfits, Don and Seldom head by car to Prairie City. Meanwhile, Barbara Clayton, owner of the Star Ranch, is having rustling problems, so Charlie Jordan, her foreman, goes to see saloon owner Jed Stratton, whom he suspects is behind the thefts, and accuses him of stealing the ranch's cattle. After Charlie leaves the saloon, Stratton orders his henchman, Buck, to get rid of him, and Buck shoots Charlie on his way back to the ranch. Don and Seldom find Charlie and take him to a hospital, then go to the Star Ranch. When one of the ranch hands suggests that Don and Seldom may have shot Charlie, Don gets into a fistfight with him and beats him. Upon arriving in Prairie City, Don visits Stratton's Frontier Saloon, as Charlie had mumbled something about "frontier" before passing out. Don and Seldom stage a brawl to attract Stratton's attention, then Don tells Stratton about their talent search. After Stratton offers to let them use his saloon as their headquarters, Don and Seldom check out one of Stratton's line shacks and find several branding irons. Stratton later agrees to allow Don to televise a talent contest from his saloon. Although he suspects that Don and Seldom may be detectives, Stratton figures that, with everybody in town for the show, his men will be able to rustle more cattle. Later, the sheriff says that a part of Seldom's spur, which had been planted by Stratton's men, has been found at the site of a rustling raid and arrests him. However, Don, who has become romantically involved with Barbara, tells the sheriff all he knows about the rustling activities, and they agree to keep Seldom in jail, as Don thinks they can trap Stratton when he tries to silence Seldom. The television broadcast gets under way and many performers appear. During the show, Don is tipped off that Clark, one of Stratton's men, is on his way to the jail. Clark lets Seldom out of his cell, explaining that his case has been cleared up, and tells him to leave. Having anticipated the set-up, Don, with gun drawn, interrupts and tells Clark to change clothes with Seldom. From across the street, Stratton then mistakenly shoots at Clark as he runs out of the jail, dressed like Seldom. When Dan goes to Stratton's office and informs him of what he has done, they struggle and Stratton runs onto the set of the television show, where the fight continues. Don is triumphant and turns Stratton over to the sheriff. Later, Don and Barbara marry, and when they and Seldom return to New York, G. K. congratulates them on the fine acts they have found and gives them a choice of a new assignment, a show about folk singers or one about hula dancers.

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 11, 1949
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Lippert Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Screen Guild Productions, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 19m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,087ft (8 reels)

Quotes

We were looking for the old west...we've found it. An old town, a beautiful blonde, changing brands, rustlers, dry gulching. Reminds me of a Don 'Red' Barry western.
- Don Blake
Don 'Red' Barry? He's my favorite actor. Did you see the picture where...
- Sam Jenks
I never liked him!
- Don Blake

Trivia

Notes

As the viewed print was missing approximately eleven minutes, certain plot details were derived from a cutting continuity in the copyright registration. The instrumental "Tennessee Wagoner" was published as "Tennessee Wagner."