The Southern Star


1h 44m 1969

Brief Synopsis

An entertaining adventure based on a Jules Verne story about the ups and downs of jewel thieves in the wilds of Africa, circa 1900

Film Details

Also Known As
L'étoile du sud
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Adventure
Release Date
Jan 1969
Premiere Information
New York opening: 28 May 1969
Production Company
Capitole Films; Columbia (British) Productions, Ltd.; Euro France Films S.a.r.l.-Paris
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures
Country
France
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel L'étoile du sud, le pays des diamants by Jules Verne (Paris, 1884).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

In French West Africa in 1912, Dan Rockland, a penniless American fortune hunter posing as a geologist, works for Kramer, a diamond tycoon and entrepreneur. Kramer's native employees find a huge diamond along the coastline, and Rockland, accompanied by his African companion, Matakit, proceeds by train to bring the gem to Kramer. Along the way they survive a dynamite explosion arranged by Capt. Karl Ludwig, Kramer's villainous security chief who is jealous of Rockland's good fortune and his courtship of Kramer's daughter, Erica. At a garden party given by Kramer to celebrate his acquisition, which is christened the "Southern Star," the lights suddenly go out. The diamond disappears, and Matakit is seen riding away on Kramer's pet ostrich. Because Rockland is suspected of complicity in the theft, Erica insists that he give chase and, furthermore, that he take her along since she is familiar with the bush country. Karl and his men follow close behind, intent on stealing the diamond themselves. Word of the theft quickly reaches the sinister Plankett, Kramer's former security chief who lost his position to Karl and swears revenge. Plankett captures Matakit and uses him as bait to trap Karl. The plan backfires, however; Karl gains the upper hand and uses Matakit to lure Rockland into a trap. With Erica's help, Rockland outwits his opponents and rescues Matakit as Karl is killed in a shootout. With the diamond returned, Kramer greets Rockland as an ideal prospective son-in-law. In the midst of the congratulations, Kramer's pet suddenly swallows a large object and bolts off to join a herd of other ostriches. Persuaded that the bulge in the bird's throat is the diamond, Kramer and Erica give chase on horseback--as Matakit opens his hand and shows Rockland the Southern Star.

Film Details

Also Known As
L'étoile du sud
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Adventure
Release Date
Jan 1969
Premiere Information
New York opening: 28 May 1969
Production Company
Capitole Films; Columbia (British) Productions, Ltd.; Euro France Films S.a.r.l.-Paris
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures
Country
France
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel L'étoile du sud, le pays des diamants by Jules Verne (Paris, 1884).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Quotes

Trivia

While living in exile in London, author Andre Laurie, pseudonym for politician Paschal Grousset (1845-1909), wrote the original version of the book which was later published as The Southern Star Mystery (1884). Andre Laurie legally renounced title to the story, rewritten and published by Jules Verne. Andre Laurie and Jules Verne would collaborate on at least two other novels. It was a strange collaboration, Andre Laurie being politically a long way to the left of Jules Verne.

Notes

Location scenes filmed in Senegal. Opened in London in May 1969; Paris opening: February 1969 as L'étoile du sud. Filmed in French and English versions.