Song of Mexico


59m 1945

Film Details

Also Known As
Cancion de Mexico
Release Date
Dec 28, 1945
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 6 Nov 1945
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Mexico City,Mexico; Mexico

Technical Specs

Duration
59m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,152ft (6 reels)

Synopsis

Actress Carol Adams retires from the theater when she becomes engaged to businessman Gregory Davis, but is increasingly frustrated by Greg's unwavering devotion to his business. Tired of being ignored, Carol leaves her engagement ring with Greg's secretary, Sarah Anderson, and flies to Mexico City to repair her broken heart and visit her friends, Anita and Arturo Martinez. On the plane, Carol meets Ramon Carranza, a handsome singer and movie star who is wildly popular in Mexico. Anita and Arturo, who are friends with Ramon, invite him to accompany them on their tour of Mexico, which they hope will take Carol's mind off her disappointing romance with Greg. Carol is at first annoyed by Ramon's flirtatiousness, but eventually is charmed by his sweet and lighthearted nature. Meanwhile, back in New York, Greg is anxious about Carol's disappearance, and when Sarah tells him that Carol left because of his neglect, he decides to follow her to Mexico City and win her back. While Carol is visiting many interesting and historical sites with her friends, Greg travels by train to Mexico. During his journey he meets sophisticated American divorcée Eve Parker, whose own marriage broke up due to the neglectful ways of her businessman husband. Eve accompanies Greg to a concert attended by Carol and her friends, and at dinner afterward, acts as if she and Greg are romantically involved when Greg reacts jealously to Ramon's attentions to Carol. Back at their hotel, Eve pursuades Greg to learn to rumba and speak Spanish to help him appear more attractive to Carol. Greg takes to his lessons so well that Carol is soon amazed by his new, carefree and relaxed demeanor, and Eve also begins to fall in love with him. As the group travels through Cuernavaca and Taxco on their way to Acapulco, however, Eve realizes that Greg still loves Carol, and begins to flirt with Ramon so that Greg will have more time alone with Carol. Carol begins to worry about Greg's business, as he has secretly told Sarah to send him a series of increasingly urgent telegrams, which he then pretends to ignore in order to devote himself to Carol. Carol is also still jealous of Eve, but finally, while the band of travelers are enjoying the beauties of Acapulco, she reconciles with Greg after he receives an "urgent" phone call from Sarah, who tells Carol that Greg has lost many important contracts due to his absence. Carol begs Greg to return to New York with her, and the reformed businessman takes her in his arms and informs her that his firm is running smoothly, and that he concocted the ruse to win her back. Greg, who has purchased a vacation home in Acapulco, promises Carol that he will balance business with pleasure from now on, and the happy couple wave to Ramon and Eve, who have also reached a romantic conclusion.

Film Details

Also Known As
Cancion de Mexico
Release Date
Dec 28, 1945
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 6 Nov 1945
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Mexico City,Mexico; Mexico

Technical Specs

Duration
59m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,152ft (6 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

This picture marked the feature-length directing and producing debut of James A. FitzPatrick, who previously had produced many short travelogues. Although a July 28, 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item announced that the film was to be the first in a five-picture series produced by FitzPatrick for Republic, to be shot in Mexico, FitzPatrick did not make any additional films in Mexico for the studio. The news item also stated that the picture would be shot in color, although the completed film is in black and white.
       Song of Mexico was shot simultaneously with a nine-reel Spanish-language version titled Cancion de Mexico. Released in Mexico City on June 30, 1946, Cancion de Mexico was copyrighted by Republic on September 28, 1945 (LP13522). A December 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item indicated that the picture was shot at the Churubusco Studios in Mexico City, but a modern, Mexican source states that the studio used was CLASA, also in Mexico City. Much background footage of Mexico was shot for the picture, using both American and Mexican crews. Entertainers appearing in the longer, Spanish-language version, who do not appear in the English version, include comedian Tin Tan and the singing group Trío Calaveras. Additional technical credits for Cancion de Mexico include Scr adpt Edmundo Santos and Sidney Fields; Production Manager Luis Sánchez Tello; and Assistant Director Winfield Sánchez.