Somebody Up There Likes Me


1h 54m 1956
Somebody Up There Likes Me

Brief Synopsis

True story of boxer Rocky Graziano's rise from juvenile delinquent to world champ.

Photos & Videos

Somebody Up There Likes Me - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Somebody Up There Likes Me - Movie Poster
Somebody Up There Likes Me - Publicity Stills

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Biography
Sports
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Jul 1956
Premiere Information
World premiere in San Francisco: 3 Jul 1956; New York opening: 5 Jul 1956
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Olympic Auditorium, California, United States; New York City--Brooklyn, New York, United States; New York City--Lower East Side, New York, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the book Somebody Up There Likes Me: The Story of My Life Until Today by Rocky Graziano with Rowland Barber (New York, 1955).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.75 : 1
Film Length
10,185ft (11 reels)

Synopsis

In Manhattan's Lower East Side, young Rocky Barbella is abused by his alcoholic father, ex-boxer Nick Barbella. Running from his home life, Rocky begins a career of robbery and petty crime, which continues into his teens, when the local church protectory finally refuses to grant him asylum from the juvenile detention system. After Rocky returns on the run from the police, Nick throws him out, calling him a bum and a devil. Rocky immediately rounds up his gang members, Romolo, Fidel and Shorty the Greek, and leads them on a series of robberies. They sell the goods to a fence in exchange for natty new suits, only to be arrested during a rumble with a rival gang. After Nick refuses to provide Rocky with an alibi, the judge sentences the boy to a prison term in Mackinaw. When Warden George Niles visits Rocky in his cell, Rocky refuses his offer of help and instead burns him with a cigarette, thus earning himself a transfer to a brutal work camp. There, he beats up a guard and, while attempting to shoot him, is forcibly restrained by the other prisoners. Fellow convict Frankie Peppo advises Rocky to use his expert fighting skills to earn money in the boxing ring, but Rocky, disgusted by any similarity to his father, refuses. For assaulting the guard, Rocky is sent to Riker's Island, where the warden attempts to break his spirit by placing him in solitary confinement. However, it is not until Rocky's mother, Ida, visits and reveals that she has been in an asylum due to her worry over him, and will give up on him if he does not reform, that he tries to go straight. Within years, he earns his release, only to discover that he has been drafted into the Army. When his superior officer disciplines him, Rocky punches him, and upon realizing the depth of trouble he has once again caused for himself, goes AWOL. He returns to New York, where he tells Romolo that he hopes to earn enough money to pay off the army captain and return to basic training. To do so, he recalls Frankie's advice and searches for him at Lou Stillman's gym. Although Frankie is back in jail, Rocky volunteers to serve as a sparring partner for a boxer. When trainers Irving Cohen and Whitey Bimstein see Rocky's power and ability, they invite him to fight for them. Rocky originally rebuffs them, but upon learning that each fight pays $75, agrees. He begins to win fight after fight, but refuses to train properly, hoping to find a different job. One day, the military police find and arrest him, and despite the fact that he shows remorse for his crimes for the first time, the court sentences him to a dishonorable discharge and one year in Leavenworth prison. There, he is a model prisoner, but soon is taunted into a fight. Sgt. Johnny Hyland, who heads the boxing squad, calls him in and offers to train him toward a career in boxing, and although Rocky remains dubious, John's guidance leads him to new skills and top physical shape. Upon his release, Rocky embarks on a series of boxing triumphs, showering his mother with prize money. One day, after he complains about his father, Ma reveals that it was her insistence that Nick stop fighting, causing him to lose his self-esteem. Later, Rocky's sister Yolanda introduces him to Norma, a pretty Jewish girl, and although Rocky feigns indifference, he soon offers to walk Norma home to Brooklyn. At her house, she urges him to call her, and despite his aloofness, they are soon dating regularly. One night, she argues with him that boxing is barbaric, but agrees to watch him train. At the gym, however, Lou dissuades Norma from taking up with a fighter, and she runs off, followed by Rocky. He waits for her all day outside her house in the rain, and when she finally returns, tells her, "I never had nothing till the ring," and she realizes that she must accept his profession. He misses his scheduled fight that night, however, prompting Irving to chastise him for becoming too happy and healthy to be a good fighter. Irving urges him to marry Norma, hoping the increased responsibility will spur him on, and although Rocky is nervous, his love for Norma drives him into the courthouse. Soon, the couple has a daughter Audrey, and Rocky, who wins every bout, becomes a neighborhood hero. During the World Middleweight competition, however, boxer Tony Zale beats Rocky viciously, and when Norma breaks down in tears, Ma reminds her that to ask Rocky to stop boxing would precipitate his ruin. By the time he returns home, Norma is cheerful and rebukes him for his loss, which strengthens his resolve to win next time. He is training hard when Frankie visits, threatening to reveal Rocky's dishonorable discharge and criminal background unless he throws the Zale rematch. Rocky refuses but, desperate to hide his past from Norma and his fans, fakes a back injury to get the bout canceled. Soon, the authorities discern the attempted fix and order Rocky to identify who blackmailed him. When Rocky refuses, his license is revoked, after which the newspapers report all the details of his past. Rocky feels devastated and doomed to never be able to achieve "legit" status, but still refuses return to crime, despite Frankie's attempts to ensnare him. Although Irving soon reports that Illinois officials have refused to uphold the New York license revocation and want Rocky to fight Zale in Chicago, Rocky is afraid to fight in front of an unfriendly crowd. He trains in Chicago, but remains angry and apprehensive. Finally, Norma explodes at him that he must learn to live with his past actions, spurring Rocky to go to New York. There, he learns that most of his friends are in jail, except for Romolo, who tells Rocky "we ain't got a chance, guys like us." Rocky then visits his father, who refuses to speak to him. Incensed, Rocky calls Nick a quitter, but when Nick begins to cry, Rocky begs to help him, and Nick responds, "Be a champ, like I never was." Newly inspired, Rocky returns to Chicago and begins training in earnest. As the championship fight begins, all of the Lower East Side listens on the radio, including his parents and John Hyland. Zale has an early lead, but despite the pummeling Rocky is taking, he refuses to give up. Round after round, he insists on returning, even after the referee threatens to stop the fight. Finally, in the sixth round, Rocky finds a last reserve of strength and knocks out Zale, to become the world champion. Upon being welcomed home to New York as a hero, Rocky declares to Norma that although he will one day lose the title, no one can ever take away the true prize he has won: self-respect.

Cast

Joseph Buloff

Benny

Sal Mineo

Romolo

Everett Sloane

Irving Cohen

Eileen Heckart

Ma [Ida] Barbella

Harold J. Stone

Nick Barbella

Pier Angeli

Norma [Graziano]

Paul Newman

Rocky [Graziano, also known as Rocky Barbella]

Sammy White

Whitey Bimstein

Arch Johnson

Heldon

Robert Lieb

Questioner

Theodore Newton

Commissioner Eddie Eagan

Robert Loggia

Frankie Peppo

Matt Crowley

Lou Stillman

Judson Pratt

Johnny Hyland

Donna Jo Gribble

Yolanda Barbella

Willard Sage

Captain

Stanley Adams

Lawyer

James O'rear

Judge

Robert Easton

Corp. Eggleston

James Todd

Colonel

Jack Kelk

George

Russ Conway

Capt. Grifton

Harry Wismer

Himself

Courtland Shepard

Tony Zale

Sam Taub

Radio announcer

Terry Rangno

Rocky, age 8

Pat Lawless

Policeman

Joe Mcguinn

Policeman

Michael Ross

Policeman

Jan Gillum

Yolanda Barbella, age 12

Steve McQueen

Fidel

Ralph Vitti

Shorty the Greek

Bern Hoffman

Overweight man

Bill Nelson

Driver

George Cisar

Fence

Walter Cartier

Polish man

Sam Gilman

Detective

John Rosser

Detective

Frank Campanella

Detective

Jack Orrison

Detective

Jack Lomas

Guard

Jack Kenney

Guard

Dick Rich

Guard

Gregg Martell

Guard

Don Shelton

Guard

Don Haggerty

Guard

Walter Johnson

Guard

Jack Shea

Guard

Sid Raymond

Subway guard

John Eldredge

Warden George Niles

Eddie Ryder

Prisoner

Wayne Taylor

Prisoner

Clancy Cooper

Capt. Lancheck

Dean Jones

Private

Ray Stricklyn

Bryson

Ralph Reed

Soldier

Caswell Adams

Sam

Andy Savilia

Reporter

Philip Morini

Reporter

Bob Bardette

Reporter

Tyler Mcvey

Reporter

Len Lesser

Reporter

Byron Kane

Reporter

Jesse Kirkpatric

Reporter

Paul Weber

Reporter

William Boyett

MP

Tony Michaels

Assistant commissioner

Vincent Correccio

Tough kid

Charles Green

Curtis Hightower

Don Shelton

Captain

Tommy White

Boy

Bart Bradley

Boy

Al Silvani

Rocky's second

Angela Cartwright

Audrey, age 3

David Leonard

Mr. Mueller

Russ Clark

Zale fight referee

Joe Costa

Racketeer

Joe Marr

Customer

Michael Bookasta

Boy at parade

Walter Beaver

Sidekick

Brad Slaven

Sidekick

Ben Moselle

Referee, Army arena

Joe Labarba

Referee, Brooklyn arena

Jimmy Murphy

Fighter

Rodney Jones

Fighter

Pete Gonzales

Fighter

Billy Wilson

Commissioner

Frank Neckero

Spectator

Ralph Neff

Spectator

Sam Scar

Spectator

Harry Arnie

Spectator

Cy Malis

Referee

Dynamite Jackson

Referee

Tom Garland

Referee

Ray Walker

Ring announcer

Benny Rubin

Ben Cameron

Robin Morse

Renata Vanni

Photo Collections

Somebody Up There Likes Me - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a number of photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of MGM's Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), starring Paul Newman and Pier Angeli, and directed by Robert Wise.
Somebody Up There Likes Me - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Somebody Up There Likes Me - Publicity Stills
Here are several publicity stills taken for MGM's Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), starring Paul Newman and Pier Angeli. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Promo

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Biography
Sports
Adaptation
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Jul 1956
Premiere Information
World premiere in San Francisco: 3 Jul 1956; New York opening: 5 Jul 1956
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Olympic Auditorium, California, United States; New York City--Brooklyn, New York, United States; New York City--Lower East Side, New York, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the book Somebody Up There Likes Me: The Story of My Life Until Today by Rocky Graziano with Rowland Barber (New York, 1955).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.75 : 1
Film Length
10,185ft (11 reels)

Award Wins

Best Art Direction

1956

Best Cinematography

1956

Award Nominations

Best Editing

1956
Albert Akst

Articles

Somebody Up There Likes Me


Based on Graziano's autobiography, Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) reveals the life of the boxer as he evolves from a young, poor ruffian, to a reform school student, to a prison inmate, to a middleweight boxing champion. Pier Angeli plays his supportive wife, Norma. Whereas Newman won rave reviews in his portrayal of Graziano, the part was originally intended for James Dean. Though Dean held a Warner Bros. contract at that time, MGM acquired his services for one film when MGM lent Elizabeth Taylor to Warners for Giant. To fulfil their agreement with Warners, MGM considered giving Dean the lead in Somebody . Dean read Graziano's autobiography and met with MGM head Dore Schary one Friday afternoon. Sadly, the following day, Saturday afternoon, Dean was killed in a head-on collision en route to a racing event in Salinas, California.

After Dean's death MGM decided that Newman should be his replacement. In his autobiography Heyday, Schary writes, "We liked Paul very much. Though he had not yet punched his way into real stardom, I felt he needed only one juicy part to get there." Newman, fresh off of two box-office disappointments (1954's The Silver Chalice and 1956's The Rack) jumped at the chance to star in the film. To some, regardless of how Newman came to be the lead in Somebody, he was better suited for the role than Dean. Says director Robert Wise: "I always had in my mind that maybe Dean was not physically a middleweight, somehow. And Paul did one of his best characterizations in it; he really caught that man." On his third film attempt, Newman finally achieved the box-office success that had eluded him previously and went on to become a major Hollywood star.

On the other hand, neither Angeli's career nor love life improved after Dean's death. Angeli had dated Dean in the 1950s and never got over his untimely demise. After she separated from her second husband in 1963, Angeli announced, "I am still in love, deeply and eternally with Jimmy Dean." With good film roles hard to come by and her love life in shambles, she sank into severe depression. When a suicidal Angeli overdosed on barbiturates in 1971, her motivation may have been her failure to come across decent film roles coupled with her inability to get over the loss of James Dean.

Despite the vast difference in how their lives turned out, Paul Newman and Pier Angeli will always be remembered for their knockout performances in Somebody Up There Likes Me.

Director: Robert Wise
Producer: Charles Schnee
Screenplay: Ernest Lehman (based on the autobiography of Rocky Graziano written with Rowland Barber)
Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Malcolm Brown
Editor: Albert Akst
Music: Bronislau Kaper
Principal Cast: Paul Newman (Rocky Graziano), Pier Angeli (Norma Graziano), Everett Sloane (Irving Cohen), Eileen Heckart (Ma Barbella), Sal Mineo (Romolo), Harold Stone (Nick Barbella), Robert Loggia (Frankie Peppo), Frank Campanella (Detective), Steve McQueen (Fidel).
BW-114m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. Descriptive Video.

by Georgelle Cole
Somebody Up There Likes Me

Somebody Up There Likes Me

Based on Graziano's autobiography, Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) reveals the life of the boxer as he evolves from a young, poor ruffian, to a reform school student, to a prison inmate, to a middleweight boxing champion. Pier Angeli plays his supportive wife, Norma. Whereas Newman won rave reviews in his portrayal of Graziano, the part was originally intended for James Dean. Though Dean held a Warner Bros. contract at that time, MGM acquired his services for one film when MGM lent Elizabeth Taylor to Warners for Giant. To fulfil their agreement with Warners, MGM considered giving Dean the lead in Somebody . Dean read Graziano's autobiography and met with MGM head Dore Schary one Friday afternoon. Sadly, the following day, Saturday afternoon, Dean was killed in a head-on collision en route to a racing event in Salinas, California. After Dean's death MGM decided that Newman should be his replacement. In his autobiography Heyday, Schary writes, "We liked Paul very much. Though he had not yet punched his way into real stardom, I felt he needed only one juicy part to get there." Newman, fresh off of two box-office disappointments (1954's The Silver Chalice and 1956's The Rack) jumped at the chance to star in the film. To some, regardless of how Newman came to be the lead in Somebody, he was better suited for the role than Dean. Says director Robert Wise: "I always had in my mind that maybe Dean was not physically a middleweight, somehow. And Paul did one of his best characterizations in it; he really caught that man." On his third film attempt, Newman finally achieved the box-office success that had eluded him previously and went on to become a major Hollywood star. On the other hand, neither Angeli's career nor love life improved after Dean's death. Angeli had dated Dean in the 1950s and never got over his untimely demise. After she separated from her second husband in 1963, Angeli announced, "I am still in love, deeply and eternally with Jimmy Dean." With good film roles hard to come by and her love life in shambles, she sank into severe depression. When a suicidal Angeli overdosed on barbiturates in 1971, her motivation may have been her failure to come across decent film roles coupled with her inability to get over the loss of James Dean. Despite the vast difference in how their lives turned out, Paul Newman and Pier Angeli will always be remembered for their knockout performances in Somebody Up There Likes Me. Director: Robert Wise Producer: Charles Schnee Screenplay: Ernest Lehman (based on the autobiography of Rocky Graziano written with Rowland Barber) Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Malcolm Brown Editor: Albert Akst Music: Bronislau Kaper Principal Cast: Paul Newman (Rocky Graziano), Pier Angeli (Norma Graziano), Everett Sloane (Irving Cohen), Eileen Heckart (Ma Barbella), Sal Mineo (Romolo), Harold Stone (Nick Barbella), Robert Loggia (Frankie Peppo), Frank Campanella (Detective), Steve McQueen (Fidel). BW-114m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. Descriptive Video. by Georgelle Cole

TCM Remembers Paul Newman (1925-2008) - Important Schedule Change for Paul Newman Tribute
Sunday, October 12


In Honor of Paul Newman, who died on September 26, TCM will air a tribute to the actor on Sunday, October 12th, replacing the current scheduled programming with the following movies:

Sunday, October 12 Program for TCM
6:00 AM The Rack
8:00 AM Until They Sail
10:00 AM Torn Curtain
12:15 PM Exodus
3:45 PM Sweet Bird of Youth
6:00 PM Hud
8:00 PM Somebody Up There Likes Me
10:00 PM Cool Hand Luke
12:15 AM Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
2:15 AM Rachel, Rachel
4:00 AM The Outrage


TCM Remembers Paul Newman (1925-2008)
Paul Newman, with his electric blue eyes and gutsy willingness to play anti-heroes, established himself as one of the movies' great leading men before settling into his latter-day career of flinty character acting. Born in Shaker Heights, Ohio, in 1925, Newman studied at the Yale Drama School and New York's Actors Studio before making his Broadway debut in Picnic.

Newman's breakthrough in films came in Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), in which he played boxer Rocky Graziano. He quickly reinforced his reputation in such vehicles as The Rack (1956) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), for which he won the first of nine Oscar® nominations as an actor.

In 1958, while shooting The Long Hot Summer (1958) - which earned him the Best Actor award at the Cannes Film Festival - in Louisiana, he became re-acquainted with Joanne Woodward, who was the film's female lead. The two soon fell in love, and after divorcing Jackie, Newman and Woodward were married in Las Vegas in 1958. The couple appeared in numerous films together and had three daughters, which they raised far from Hollywood in the affluent neighborhood of Westport, CT.

The 1960s was a fruitful decade for Newman, who starred in such hits as Exodus (1960), Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969); and scored Oscar® nominations for The Hustler (1961), Hud (1963) and Cool Hand Luke (1967).

Newman's political activism also came to the forefront during the sixties, through tireless campaigning for Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential campaign. His association with McCarthy led to his being named on future President Richard Nixon's infamous "Opponents List;" Newman, who ranked #19 out of 20, later commented that his inclusion was among the proudest achievements of his career.

Newman's superstar status - he was the top-ranking box office star in 1969 and 1970 - allowed him to experiment with film roles during the 1970s, which led to quirky choices like WUSA (1970), Sometimes a Great Notion (1971), Pocket Money (1972), and The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972) - all of which he also produced through First Artists, a company he established with fellow stars Sidney Poitier and Barbra Streisand.

After coming close to winning an Oscar® for Absence of Malice (1981), Newman finally won the award itself for The Color of Money (1986). He also received an honorary Oscar® in 1986 and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1994. A producer and director as well as an actor, Newman has directed his wife (and frequent costar) Joanne Woodward through some of her most effective screen performances [Rachel, Rachel (1968), The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds (1972)].

He remained active as an actor in his later years, playing the Stage Manager in Our Town on both stage and television, lending his voice to the animated features Cars (2006) and Mater and the Ghostlight (2006). Off-screen, Newman set the standard for celebrity-driven charities with his Newman's Own brand of foods, which brought $200 million to causes, and the Hole in the Wall Gang camp for seriously ill children.

TCM Remembers Paul Newman (1925-2008) - Important Schedule Change for Paul Newman Tribute Sunday, October 12

In Honor of Paul Newman, who died on September 26, TCM will air a tribute to the actor on Sunday, October 12th, replacing the current scheduled programming with the following movies: Sunday, October 12 Program for TCM 6:00 AM The Rack 8:00 AM Until They Sail 10:00 AM Torn Curtain 12:15 PM Exodus 3:45 PM Sweet Bird of Youth 6:00 PM Hud 8:00 PM Somebody Up There Likes Me 10:00 PM Cool Hand Luke 12:15 AM Cat on a Hot Tin Roof 2:15 AM Rachel, Rachel 4:00 AM The Outrage TCM Remembers Paul Newman (1925-2008) Paul Newman, with his electric blue eyes and gutsy willingness to play anti-heroes, established himself as one of the movies' great leading men before settling into his latter-day career of flinty character acting. Born in Shaker Heights, Ohio, in 1925, Newman studied at the Yale Drama School and New York's Actors Studio before making his Broadway debut in Picnic. Newman's breakthrough in films came in Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), in which he played boxer Rocky Graziano. He quickly reinforced his reputation in such vehicles as The Rack (1956) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), for which he won the first of nine Oscar® nominations as an actor. In 1958, while shooting The Long Hot Summer (1958) - which earned him the Best Actor award at the Cannes Film Festival - in Louisiana, he became re-acquainted with Joanne Woodward, who was the film's female lead. The two soon fell in love, and after divorcing Jackie, Newman and Woodward were married in Las Vegas in 1958. The couple appeared in numerous films together and had three daughters, which they raised far from Hollywood in the affluent neighborhood of Westport, CT. The 1960s was a fruitful decade for Newman, who starred in such hits as Exodus (1960), Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969); and scored Oscar® nominations for The Hustler (1961), Hud (1963) and Cool Hand Luke (1967). Newman's political activism also came to the forefront during the sixties, through tireless campaigning for Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential campaign. His association with McCarthy led to his being named on future President Richard Nixon's infamous "Opponents List;" Newman, who ranked #19 out of 20, later commented that his inclusion was among the proudest achievements of his career. Newman's superstar status - he was the top-ranking box office star in 1969 and 1970 - allowed him to experiment with film roles during the 1970s, which led to quirky choices like WUSA (1970), Sometimes a Great Notion (1971), Pocket Money (1972), and The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972) - all of which he also produced through First Artists, a company he established with fellow stars Sidney Poitier and Barbra Streisand. After coming close to winning an Oscar® for Absence of Malice (1981), Newman finally won the award itself for The Color of Money (1986). He also received an honorary Oscar® in 1986 and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1994. A producer and director as well as an actor, Newman has directed his wife (and frequent costar) Joanne Woodward through some of her most effective screen performances [Rachel, Rachel (1968), The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds (1972)]. He remained active as an actor in his later years, playing the Stage Manager in Our Town on both stage and television, lending his voice to the animated features Cars (2006) and Mater and the Ghostlight (2006). Off-screen, Newman set the standard for celebrity-driven charities with his Newman's Own brand of foods, which brought $200 million to causes, and the Hole in the Wall Gang camp for seriously ill children.

Robert Wise (1914-2005)


Robert Wise, who died at age 91 on September 14, was the noted film editor of Citizen Kane (1941) and other movies before he became a producer and director, and all his works are marked by striking visual rhythms. He is best remembered for two enormously popular musicals, West Side Story (1959) and The Sound of Music (1965), which brought him a total of four Oscars® -- each winning for Best Picture and Best Director. (Wise's directorial award for West Side Story was shared with Jerome Robbins.)

Born on September 10, 1914 in Winchester, Ind., Wise was a child of the Depression who quit college to earn a living in the movie industry. He began as an assistant cutter at RKO, where he worked his way up to the position of film editor and earned an Oscar® nomination for his bravura work with Orson Welles on Citizen Kane. He also edited The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) for Welles, along with several other RKO films.

Wise became a director by default when RKO and producer Val Lewton assigned him to The Curse of the Cat People (1944) after Gunther von Fritsch failed to meet the film's production schedule. Wise turned the film into a first-rate psychological thriller, and enjoyed equal success with another Lewton horror film, The Body Snatcher (1945).

Critical praise also was showered upon Wise's Born to Kill (1947), a crime melodrama; and Blood on the Moon (1948), an unusual psychological Western starring Robert Mitchum. Even more highly regarded was The Set-Up (1949), a no-punches-pulled boxing drama that won the Critics' Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Wise moved on from RKO in the early 1950s, directing one of the movies' classic alien invasion films, The Day the Earth Stood Still, for 20th Century Fox.

At MGM he directed Executive Suite (1954), a compelling all-star boardroom drama; Somebody Up There Likes Me, a film bio of boxer Rocky Graziano that established Paul Newman as a major star; and The Haunting (1963), a chilling haunted-hause melodrama. His films for United Artists include Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), a submarine drama with Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster; I Want to Live! (1958), a harrowing account of a convicted murderess on Death Row, with Susan Hayward in her Oscar-winning performance; and the crime caper Odds Against Tomorrow (1959).

Wise served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Directors Guild of America. He was awarded the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1966, and the Directors Guild's highest honor, the D.W. Griffith Award, in 1988. He remained active as a director through the 1970s. His final film, Rooftops (1989) was a musical with an urban setting that recalled West Side Story.

The films in TCM's salute to Robert Wise are Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Curse of the Cat People (1944), The Body Snatcher (1945), Born to Kill (1947), Blood on the Moon (1948), The Set-Up (1949), Executive Suite (1954), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), B>West Side Story (1959), Odds Against Tomorrow (1959) and The Haunting (1963).

by Roger Fristoe

Robert Wise (1914-2005)

Robert Wise, who died at age 91 on September 14, was the noted film editor of Citizen Kane (1941) and other movies before he became a producer and director, and all his works are marked by striking visual rhythms. He is best remembered for two enormously popular musicals, West Side Story (1959) and The Sound of Music (1965), which brought him a total of four Oscars® -- each winning for Best Picture and Best Director. (Wise's directorial award for West Side Story was shared with Jerome Robbins.) Born on September 10, 1914 in Winchester, Ind., Wise was a child of the Depression who quit college to earn a living in the movie industry. He began as an assistant cutter at RKO, where he worked his way up to the position of film editor and earned an Oscar® nomination for his bravura work with Orson Welles on Citizen Kane. He also edited The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) for Welles, along with several other RKO films. Wise became a director by default when RKO and producer Val Lewton assigned him to The Curse of the Cat People (1944) after Gunther von Fritsch failed to meet the film's production schedule. Wise turned the film into a first-rate psychological thriller, and enjoyed equal success with another Lewton horror film, The Body Snatcher (1945). Critical praise also was showered upon Wise's Born to Kill (1947), a crime melodrama; and Blood on the Moon (1948), an unusual psychological Western starring Robert Mitchum. Even more highly regarded was The Set-Up (1949), a no-punches-pulled boxing drama that won the Critics' Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Wise moved on from RKO in the early 1950s, directing one of the movies' classic alien invasion films, The Day the Earth Stood Still, for 20th Century Fox. At MGM he directed Executive Suite (1954), a compelling all-star boardroom drama; Somebody Up There Likes Me, a film bio of boxer Rocky Graziano that established Paul Newman as a major star; and The Haunting (1963), a chilling haunted-hause melodrama. His films for United Artists include Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), a submarine drama with Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster; I Want to Live! (1958), a harrowing account of a convicted murderess on Death Row, with Susan Hayward in her Oscar-winning performance; and the crime caper Odds Against Tomorrow (1959). Wise served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Directors Guild of America. He was awarded the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1966, and the Directors Guild's highest honor, the D.W. Griffith Award, in 1988. He remained active as a director through the 1970s. His final film, Rooftops (1989) was a musical with an urban setting that recalled West Side Story. The films in TCM's salute to Robert Wise are Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Curse of the Cat People (1944), The Body Snatcher (1945), Born to Kill (1947), Blood on the Moon (1948), The Set-Up (1949), Executive Suite (1954), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), B>West Side Story (1959), Odds Against Tomorrow (1959) and The Haunting (1963). by Roger Fristoe

Ernest Lehman (1915-2005)


Ernest Lehman, the acclaimed screenwriter who did everything from stranding Cary Grant in a cornfield (North by Northwest) to seeing Julie Andrews help the Von Trap family escape the Nazis in (The Sound of Music) died on July 2 in Los Angeles following an undisclosed illness. He was 89.

Born on December 8, 1915 in New York City, Lehman graduated from New York's City College with a degree in English. After graduation he found work as a writer for many mediums: radio, theater, and popular magazines of the day like Collier's before landing his first story in Hollywood for the comedy, The Inside Story (1948). The success of that film didn't lead immediately to screenwriting some of Hollywood's biggest hits, but his persistancy to break into the silver screen paid off by the mid-'50s: the delicious Audrey Hepburn comedy Sabrina (1954, his first Oscar® nomination and first Golden Globe award); Paul Newman's first hit based on the life of Rocky Graziano Somebody Up There Likes Me; and his razor sharp expose of the publicity world based on his own experiences as an assistant for a theatre publicist The Sweet Smell of Success (1957).

Lehman's verasitily and gift for playful dialogue came to the fore for Alfred Hitchcock's memorable North by Northwes (1959, his second Oscar® nomination); and he showed a knack for moving potentially stiff Broadway fodder into swift cinematic fare with West Side Story (1961, a third Oscar® nomination); The Sound of Music (1965); Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966); and Hello, Dolly! (1969, the last two being his final Oscar® nominations for screenwriting).

Lehman took his turn as a director when he adapted Philip Roth's comic novel Portnoy's Complaint (1972) for film, and despite some good reviews, it wasn't a commercial hit. He wrote just two more screenplays before retiring: an underrated comic mystery gem for Hitchcock Family Plot (1976); and the big budget Robert Shaw espionage drama Black Sunday (1977). Lehman served as president of the Writers Guild of America from 1983-85. After going zero for five with his Oscar® nominations, the Academy made it up to him in 2001, by presenting him with an honorary Academy Award for his "body of varied and enduring work." Lehman is survived by his wife Laurie and three children.

by Michael T. Toole

Ernest Lehman (1915-2005)

Ernest Lehman, the acclaimed screenwriter who did everything from stranding Cary Grant in a cornfield (North by Northwest) to seeing Julie Andrews help the Von Trap family escape the Nazis in (The Sound of Music) died on July 2 in Los Angeles following an undisclosed illness. He was 89. Born on December 8, 1915 in New York City, Lehman graduated from New York's City College with a degree in English. After graduation he found work as a writer for many mediums: radio, theater, and popular magazines of the day like Collier's before landing his first story in Hollywood for the comedy, The Inside Story (1948). The success of that film didn't lead immediately to screenwriting some of Hollywood's biggest hits, but his persistancy to break into the silver screen paid off by the mid-'50s: the delicious Audrey Hepburn comedy Sabrina (1954, his first Oscar® nomination and first Golden Globe award); Paul Newman's first hit based on the life of Rocky Graziano Somebody Up There Likes Me; and his razor sharp expose of the publicity world based on his own experiences as an assistant for a theatre publicist The Sweet Smell of Success (1957). Lehman's verasitily and gift for playful dialogue came to the fore for Alfred Hitchcock's memorable North by Northwes (1959, his second Oscar® nomination); and he showed a knack for moving potentially stiff Broadway fodder into swift cinematic fare with West Side Story (1961, a third Oscar® nomination); The Sound of Music (1965); Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966); and Hello, Dolly! (1969, the last two being his final Oscar® nominations for screenwriting). Lehman took his turn as a director when he adapted Philip Roth's comic novel Portnoy's Complaint (1972) for film, and despite some good reviews, it wasn't a commercial hit. He wrote just two more screenplays before retiring: an underrated comic mystery gem for Hitchcock Family Plot (1976); and the big budget Robert Shaw espionage drama Black Sunday (1977). Lehman served as president of the Writers Guild of America from 1983-85. After going zero for five with his Oscar® nominations, the Academy made it up to him in 2001, by presenting him with an honorary Academy Award for his "body of varied and enduring work." Lehman is survived by his wife Laurie and three children. by Michael T. Toole

TCM Remembers - Eileen Heckart


TCM REMEMBERS EILEEN HECKART, DAVID SWIFT & PAUL LANDRES

Eileen Heckart, who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Butterflies Are Free (1972), died December 31st at the age of 82. Heckart was born in 1919 in Columbus, Ohio and became interested in acting while in college. She moved to NYC in 1942, married her college boyfriend the following year (a marriage that lasted until his death in 1995) and started acting on stage. Soon she was appearing in live dramatic TV such as The Philco Television Playhouse and Studio One. Her first feature film appearance was as a waitress in Bus Stop (1956) but it was her role as a grieving mother in the following year's The Bad Seed that really attracted notice and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Heckart spent more time on Broadway and TV, making only occasional film appearances in Heller in Pink Tights (1960), No Way to Treat a Lady (1968) and Heartbreak Ridge (1986). She won one Emmy and was nominated for five others.

TCM REMEMBERS DAVID SWIFT, 1919-2001

Director David Swift died December 31st at the age of 82. Swift was best-known for the 1967 film version of the Broadway musical, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (he also appears in a cameo), Good Neighbor Sam (1964) starring Jack Lemmon and The Parent Trap (1961), all of which he also co-wrote. Swift was born in Minnesota but moved to California in the early 30s so he could work for Disney as an assistant animator, contributing to a string of classics from Dumbo (1941) to Fantasia (1940) to Snow White (1937). Swift also worked with madcap animator Tex Avery at MGM. He later became a TV and radio comedy writer and by the 1950s was directing episodes of TV series like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Playhouse 90 and others. Swift also created Mr. Peepers (1952), one of TV's first hit series and a multiple Emmy nominee. Swift's first feature film was Pollyanna (1960) for which he recorded a DVD commentary last year. Swift twice received Writers Guild nominations for work on How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and The Parent Trap.

TCM REMEMBERS PAUL LANDRES, 1912-2001

Prolific B-movie director Paul Landres died December 26th at the age of 89. Landres was born in New York City in 1912 but his family soon moved to Los Angeles where he grew up. He spent a couple of years attending UCLA before becoming an assistant editor at Universal in the 1931. He became a full editor in 1937, working on such films as Pittsburgh (1942) and I Shot Jesse James (1949). His first directorial effort was 1949's Grand Canyon but he soon became fast and reliable, alternating B-movies with TV episodes.. His best known films are Go, Johnny, Go! (1958) with appearances by Chuck Berry and Jackie Wilson, the moody The Return of Dracula (1958) and the 1957 cult favorite The Vampire. His TV credits run to some 350 episodes for such series as Adam 12, Bonanza, Death Valley Days and numerous others. Landres was co-founder in 1950 of the honorary society American Cinema Editors.

BUDD BOETTICHER 1916-2001

When director Budd Boetticher died on November 29th, American film lost another master. Though not a household name, Boetticher made crisp, tightly wound movies with more substance and emotional depth than was apparent at first glance. Instead of a flashy style, Boetticher preferred one imaginatively simple and almost elegant at times. Because of this approach films like The Tall T (1957), Decision at Sundown (1957), The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and Ride Lonesome (1960) have withstood the test of time while more blatantly ambitious films now seem like period pieces.

Budd was born Oscar Boetticher in Chicago on July 29th, 1916. With a father who sold hardware, Boetticher didn't come from a particularly artistic background. In college he boxed and played football before graduating and heading to Mexico to follow what's surely one of the most unusual ways to enter the film industry: as a professional matador. That's what led an old friend to get Boetticher hired as a bullfighting advisor on the 1941 version of Blood and Sand. Boetticher quickly took other small jobs in Hollywood before becoming an assistant director for films like Cover Girl. In 1944, he directed his first film, the Boston Blackie entry One Mysterious Night. Boetticher made a series of other B-movies, like the underrated film noir Behind Locked Doors (1948), through the rest of the decade.

Boetticher really hit his stride in the 50s when he began to get higher profile assignments, including the semi-autobiographical The Bullfighter and the Lady in 1951 which resulted in Boetticher's only Oscar nomination, for Best Writing. Sam Peckinpah later said he saw the film ten times. Other highlights of this period include Seminole (1953) (one of the first Hollywood films sympathetic to American Indians), the stylishly tight thriller The Killer Is Loose (1956) and the minor classic Horizons West (1952). In the late 50s, Boetticher also started directing TV episodes of series like Maverick and 77 Sunset Strip.

In 1956, Boetticher started a string of films that really established his reputation. These six Westerns starring Randolph Scott are known as the Ranown films after the production company named after Randolph Scott and producer Harry Joe Brown. Actually the first, Seven Men from Now (1956), was produced by a different company but all of them fit together, pushing the idea of the lone cowboy seeking revenge into new territory. The sharp Decision at Sundown twists Western cliche into one of the bleakest endings to slip through the Hollywood gates. The Tall T examines the genre's violent tendencies while Ride Lonesome and Buchanan Rides Alone (1958) have titles appropriate to their Beckett-like stories. The final film, Comanche Station, appeared in 1960.

That was the same year Boetticher made one of the best gangster films, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond, before watching everything fall apart. He and his wife decided to make a documentary about the famous matador Carlos Arruza and headed to Mexico. There Boetticher saw Arruza and much of the film crew die in an accident, almost died himself from an illness, separated from and divorced his wife (Debra Paget), and then spent time in various jails and even briefly a mental institution. This harrowing experience left him bankrupt but he still managed to complete the film, Arruza (1968), which gathered acclaim from the few who've been able to see it.

Boetticher managed to make just one more film, My Kingdom For... (1985), a self-reflexive documentary about raising Andalusian horses. He also made a cameo appearance in the Mel Gibson-Kurt Russell suspense thriller, Tequila Sunrise (1988). He died from complications from surgery at the age of 85.

By Lang Thompson

TCM Remembers - Eileen Heckart

TCM REMEMBERS EILEEN HECKART, DAVID SWIFT & PAUL LANDRES Eileen Heckart, who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Butterflies Are Free (1972), died December 31st at the age of 82. Heckart was born in 1919 in Columbus, Ohio and became interested in acting while in college. She moved to NYC in 1942, married her college boyfriend the following year (a marriage that lasted until his death in 1995) and started acting on stage. Soon she was appearing in live dramatic TV such as The Philco Television Playhouse and Studio One. Her first feature film appearance was as a waitress in Bus Stop (1956) but it was her role as a grieving mother in the following year's The Bad Seed that really attracted notice and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Heckart spent more time on Broadway and TV, making only occasional film appearances in Heller in Pink Tights (1960), No Way to Treat a Lady (1968) and Heartbreak Ridge (1986). She won one Emmy and was nominated for five others. TCM REMEMBERS DAVID SWIFT, 1919-2001 Director David Swift died December 31st at the age of 82. Swift was best-known for the 1967 film version of the Broadway musical, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (he also appears in a cameo), Good Neighbor Sam (1964) starring Jack Lemmon and The Parent Trap (1961), all of which he also co-wrote. Swift was born in Minnesota but moved to California in the early 30s so he could work for Disney as an assistant animator, contributing to a string of classics from Dumbo (1941) to Fantasia (1940) to Snow White (1937). Swift also worked with madcap animator Tex Avery at MGM. He later became a TV and radio comedy writer and by the 1950s was directing episodes of TV series like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Playhouse 90 and others. Swift also created Mr. Peepers (1952), one of TV's first hit series and a multiple Emmy nominee. Swift's first feature film was Pollyanna (1960) for which he recorded a DVD commentary last year. Swift twice received Writers Guild nominations for work on How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and The Parent Trap. TCM REMEMBERS PAUL LANDRES, 1912-2001 Prolific B-movie director Paul Landres died December 26th at the age of 89. Landres was born in New York City in 1912 but his family soon moved to Los Angeles where he grew up. He spent a couple of years attending UCLA before becoming an assistant editor at Universal in the 1931. He became a full editor in 1937, working on such films as Pittsburgh (1942) and I Shot Jesse James (1949). His first directorial effort was 1949's Grand Canyon but he soon became fast and reliable, alternating B-movies with TV episodes.. His best known films are Go, Johnny, Go! (1958) with appearances by Chuck Berry and Jackie Wilson, the moody The Return of Dracula (1958) and the 1957 cult favorite The Vampire. His TV credits run to some 350 episodes for such series as Adam 12, Bonanza, Death Valley Days and numerous others. Landres was co-founder in 1950 of the honorary society American Cinema Editors. BUDD BOETTICHER 1916-2001 When director Budd Boetticher died on November 29th, American film lost another master. Though not a household name, Boetticher made crisp, tightly wound movies with more substance and emotional depth than was apparent at first glance. Instead of a flashy style, Boetticher preferred one imaginatively simple and almost elegant at times. Because of this approach films like The Tall T (1957), Decision at Sundown (1957), The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and Ride Lonesome (1960) have withstood the test of time while more blatantly ambitious films now seem like period pieces. Budd was born Oscar Boetticher in Chicago on July 29th, 1916. With a father who sold hardware, Boetticher didn't come from a particularly artistic background. In college he boxed and played football before graduating and heading to Mexico to follow what's surely one of the most unusual ways to enter the film industry: as a professional matador. That's what led an old friend to get Boetticher hired as a bullfighting advisor on the 1941 version of Blood and Sand. Boetticher quickly took other small jobs in Hollywood before becoming an assistant director for films like Cover Girl. In 1944, he directed his first film, the Boston Blackie entry One Mysterious Night. Boetticher made a series of other B-movies, like the underrated film noir Behind Locked Doors (1948), through the rest of the decade. Boetticher really hit his stride in the 50s when he began to get higher profile assignments, including the semi-autobiographical The Bullfighter and the Lady in 1951 which resulted in Boetticher's only Oscar nomination, for Best Writing. Sam Peckinpah later said he saw the film ten times. Other highlights of this period include Seminole (1953) (one of the first Hollywood films sympathetic to American Indians), the stylishly tight thriller The Killer Is Loose (1956) and the minor classic Horizons West (1952). In the late 50s, Boetticher also started directing TV episodes of series like Maverick and 77 Sunset Strip. In 1956, Boetticher started a string of films that really established his reputation. These six Westerns starring Randolph Scott are known as the Ranown films after the production company named after Randolph Scott and producer Harry Joe Brown. Actually the first, Seven Men from Now (1956), was produced by a different company but all of them fit together, pushing the idea of the lone cowboy seeking revenge into new territory. The sharp Decision at Sundown twists Western cliche into one of the bleakest endings to slip through the Hollywood gates. The Tall T examines the genre's violent tendencies while Ride Lonesome and Buchanan Rides Alone (1958) have titles appropriate to their Beckett-like stories. The final film, Comanche Station, appeared in 1960. That was the same year Boetticher made one of the best gangster films, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond, before watching everything fall apart. He and his wife decided to make a documentary about the famous matador Carlos Arruza and headed to Mexico. There Boetticher saw Arruza and much of the film crew die in an accident, almost died himself from an illness, separated from and divorced his wife (Debra Paget), and then spent time in various jails and even briefly a mental institution. This harrowing experience left him bankrupt but he still managed to complete the film, Arruza (1968), which gathered acclaim from the few who've been able to see it. Boetticher managed to make just one more film, My Kingdom For... (1985), a self-reflexive documentary about raising Andalusian horses. He also made a cameo appearance in the Mel Gibson-Kurt Russell suspense thriller, Tequila Sunrise (1988). He died from complications from surgery at the age of 85. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

'James Dean' was signed to play Rocky graziano, but was replaced by 'Paul Newman' after Dean died in an automobile accident on 30 September 1955.

'Steve McQueen' 's motion picture debut.

Notes

The opening credits begin with the following quote: "`This is the way I remember it-definitely.'-┬┐Rocky Graziano." The opening and closing cast credits differ in order. In the opening credits, Paul Newman is listed first, followed by Pier Angeli. In early 1955, Hollywood Reporter reported that M-G-M had paid $230,000 for the rights to Graziano's autobiography, which was to be published in Feb. Studio press notes state that Ernest Lehman based the screenplay on many interviews with Graziano's friends and family, as well as on the autobiography. As portrayed in the film, Graziano (1919-1990), whose original last name was Barbella, was born in New York to a former boxer and escaped an early life of crime by triumphing in the boxing ring. Graziano was middleweight boxing champion of the world from 1947-1948. As in the film, Graziano won his second title fight over Tony Zale. Although the film ends after Graziano wins the title, Sale regained it in their third and final match. Not shown in the film was the fact that, as a boy, Graziano was sent to live with his grandparents when his parents found him unmanageable. In his later life, the boxer became a popular actor, appearing regularly on The Martha Raye Show and making guest appearances on variety shows, as well as acting as a spokesman in television commercials.
       As confirmed in modern interviews with director Robert Wise, the studio bought the property for James Dean, who died before the completion of the script. "Rambling Reporter" also noted in June 1955 that Dewey Martin was being considered for a leading role, and in September 1955 that Dean Martin was being loaned to the M-G-M production. In addition, Hollywood Reporter news items in September and October 1955 added that Sam Levene would portray Rocky's manager and former world champion boxer Jack Dempsey would play himself in the film. None of these stars appeared in the film, however. Although "Rambling Reporter" announced in August 1955 that Robin Morse was being considered to play a fight manager, he appears only as a bit player in the picture. A January 1956 "Rambling Reporter" item stated that Pier Angeli would sing the film's title song, but Perry Como sang the song, and later recorded it as a single for RKO Records. Additional Hollywood Reporter news items in January and March 1956 add the following actors to the cast: Elinor Donahue, Charles Easton, Lillian Powell, and boxers Pat Valentino, Bill Filippo and Tommy Herman. Donahue was not in the film and the appearance of the other actors has not been confirmed.
       The film was shot partially on location in New York, in Manhattan's Lower East Side and in Brooklyn. Hollywood Diary reported in April 1956 that M-G-M had rented out the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles to shoot the Yankee Stadium prizefight scene. Dean Jones and Broadway actress Eileen Heckart (1919-2001) made their feature-film debuts in the picture, as did character actor Frank Campanella (1919-2006). Somebody Up There Likes Me also marked the acting debut of Steve McQueen (1930-1980), although he had appeared as an extra in the 1953 film Girl on the Run. Modern sources note that Paul Newman, who was loaned to M-G-M from Warner Bros. for the role, spent time with Graziano in order to learn his mannerisms and speech patterns. After the release of Somebody Up There Likes Me, contemporary critics regularly compared Newman to Marlon Brando, with Hollywood Reporter stating that with this film, "we have a male actor projected to major stardom on the basis of one performance." The reviews were almost unanimously positive, including Variety, which called the film "a superb and outstanding piece of film dramaturgy." Somebody Up There Likes Me was nominated for an Academy Award for Film Editing (Albert Akst) and won Academy Awards for Art Direction, Black and White (art direction-Cedric Gibbons and Malcolm Brown; set decorations-Edwin B. Willis, Keogh Gleason) and for Cinematography, Black and White (Joseph Ruttenberg).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 1956

Released in United States July 1956

Released in United States on Video November 15, 1988

Released in United States Summer June 1956

Released in United States July 1956

Released in United States on Video November 15, 1988

Voted One of the Year's Ten Best Films by the 1956 National Board of Review.