The Slipper and the Rose


2h 26m 1976
The Slipper and the Rose

Brief Synopsis

An impoverished orphan dreams of attending the royal ball.

Film Details

Also Known As
Slipper and the Rose, Slipper and the Rose--The Story of Cinderella, Story of Cinderella, The
Genre
Romance
Family
Musical
Fantasy
Adaptation
Release Date
1976
Distribution Company
Cic Productions; Universal Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 26m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

In this musical re-telling of Cinderella, the king of Euphrania is determined to find his son a wife who will provide a political alliance to prevent war, but Prince Edward wants to marry for love. The king hosts a ball to find a suitable match. Cinderella, is living as a servant in her own home since the death of her father, but manages to attend the ball when her fairy godmother casts a spell on her. At the ball, the prince falls in love with Cinderella, who rushes home as the spell wears off, losing one slipper on the way. Prince Edward takes the slipper and searches for the girl who owns it, his one true love, in spite of the political ramifications for his kingdom.

Film Details

Also Known As
Slipper and the Rose, Slipper and the Rose--The Story of Cinderella, Story of Cinderella, The
Genre
Romance
Family
Musical
Fantasy
Adaptation
Release Date
1976
Distribution Company
Cic Productions; Universal Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 26m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Song

1976

Best Song Score

1978

Articles

The Slipper and the Rose


There have been many movie versions of the Cinderella story, some of them memorable, others less so; but in spite of the sure-fire material, not all of them enjoyed box office success. One of the most sumptuous was the extravagant, no-expense-spared original musical, 1976's The Slipper and the Rose, a British production with a terrific, mostly-English cast, plus American star Richard Chamberlain as a dashing, singing Prince Charming. In spite of the high production values and music and lyrics by the legendary Sherman Brothers (who wrote songs for Mary Poppins and other Disney hits), the film was a flop in the United States, although it was a hit in Great Britain.

Produced by talk show host David Frost The Slipper and the Rose is based on the French version by of the tale written by Charles Perrault in 1697, and the film is set in that era, with the elaborate costumes, powdered wigs, and furnishings reflecting the elegant excess of the time. Frost brought the project to Richard and Robert Sherman and asked them to write the screenplay as well as the score. At first they demurred, since they felt that Rodgers & Hammerstein had already written the definitive musical version, a television special which starred Julie Andrews, in 1957. Looking for a new approach, the Shermans decided to tell the story from the Prince's point of view. The Slipper and the Rose begins with the Prince talk-singing "Why Can't I Be Two People," an amusing ditty bemoaning his royal duty to marry for dynastic and political reasons instead of for love.

Blond and handsome Richard Chamberlain had become a star in the 1960s, playing the title role in the television series Doctor Kildare. During the run of the series he also became something of a teen idol when he had a pop hit with the song "Three Stars Will Shine Tonight," based on the theme music from the show. When Doctor Kildare ended, Chamberlain was determined to prove his versatility and did stage work in musicals and dramas, moving to England in the late 1960s. He even played Hamlet in repertory. By the time he appeared in The Slipper and the Rose he was a familiar performer in British films and television, and his American stardom was expected to be an asset for the film.

According to publicity for The Slipper and the Rose, Irish-born singer and actress Gemma Craven was cast as Cinderella after a year-long search, during which producers considered eighty-five actresses for the role. It was her film debut. Though she went on to have an impressive career in Britain on the stage and in television, The Slipper and the Rose proved to be her most substantial film role. Her portrayal of Cinderella is sweet, but not saccharine, and she displays a more complex personality than the one-note heroines in other versions of the tale.

Supporting the attractive romantic leads were some of Britain's legendary acting greats, singing and dancing in comic gem performances: Edith Evans then 87, in her penultimate role was the dotty dowager Queen Mother; Kenneth More played the officious Lord High Chamberlain, aptly described by the prince as "the ever unctuous"; Margaret Lockwood was an icy-chic wicked stepmother; and Annette Crosbie sparkled as the overworked fairy godmother. As the King, veteran actor Michael Hordern, all bumbling dignity, leads a Rockettes-kicking chorus line of 3elderly ministers singing the comic song "Protocoligorically Correct."
< br> Visually, The Slipper and the Rose is fairytale-gorgeous. The company spent several weeks filming on location at two castles near Salzburg, Austria, where The Sound of Music had been filmed, as well as in Salzburg itself. Even before principal production began, director Bryan Forbes and crew had filmed some exteriors of winter scenes in the nearby Bavarian mountains. The interiors were shot at Pinewood Studios outside London, re-creating the elaborate interiors of Austrian and German castles of the appropriate era. One of the loveliest re-creations had nothing to do with royal grandeur. A scene near the end of the film of a sad Cinderella on a flower-bedecked garden swing is an homage to the famous 18th century Fragonard painting, "The Swing," with Cinderella in a pink dress and hat copied from that artwork. The film's British premiere took place at a Royal Command Performance, with the Queen Mother in attendance. It did well in Britain, with both critics and audiences, but American audiences stayed away, perhaps because the era of big-budget musicals was over and they found the film old-fashioned. Reviews in the U.S. were tepid at best. Vincent Canby of the New York Times was particularly grumpy, calling it "a movie to turn a prince into a frog....It's harmless, I guess, but it goes on so long...that it may well outlast the staying power of children who stuff themselves with popcorn and then drink to excess." Although it was nominated for two Academy Awards for its music, it was not a success. Over the years, though, The Slipper and the Rose has become a cult favorite, both in Britain, where for many years it was a holiday season staple on television, and in the U.S., where it has rarely been seen since its initial release.

Director: Bryan Forbes
Producer: David Frost, Stewart Lyons
Screenplay: Bryan Forbes, Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman
Cinematography: Tony Imi
Editor: Timothy Gee
Costume Design: Julie Harris
Production Design: Raymond Simm
Music: Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman, Angela Morley
Principal Cast: Richard Chamberlain (Prince Edward), Gemma Craven (Cinderella), Edith Evans (Dowager Queen), Annette Crosbie (Fairy Godmother), Christopher Gable (John), Michael Hordern (King), Margaret Lockwood (Stepmother), Kenneth More (Chamberlain), Lally Bowers (Queen).
C-143m.

by Margarita Landazuri
The Slipper And The Rose

The Slipper and the Rose

There have been many movie versions of the Cinderella story, some of them memorable, others less so; but in spite of the sure-fire material, not all of them enjoyed box office success. One of the most sumptuous was the extravagant, no-expense-spared original musical, 1976's The Slipper and the Rose, a British production with a terrific, mostly-English cast, plus American star Richard Chamberlain as a dashing, singing Prince Charming. In spite of the high production values and music and lyrics by the legendary Sherman Brothers (who wrote songs for Mary Poppins and other Disney hits), the film was a flop in the United States, although it was a hit in Great Britain. Produced by talk show host David Frost The Slipper and the Rose is based on the French version by of the tale written by Charles Perrault in 1697, and the film is set in that era, with the elaborate costumes, powdered wigs, and furnishings reflecting the elegant excess of the time. Frost brought the project to Richard and Robert Sherman and asked them to write the screenplay as well as the score. At first they demurred, since they felt that Rodgers & Hammerstein had already written the definitive musical version, a television special which starred Julie Andrews, in 1957. Looking for a new approach, the Shermans decided to tell the story from the Prince's point of view. The Slipper and the Rose begins with the Prince talk-singing "Why Can't I Be Two People," an amusing ditty bemoaning his royal duty to marry for dynastic and political reasons instead of for love. Blond and handsome Richard Chamberlain had become a star in the 1960s, playing the title role in the television series Doctor Kildare. During the run of the series he also became something of a teen idol when he had a pop hit with the song "Three Stars Will Shine Tonight," based on the theme music from the show. When Doctor Kildare ended, Chamberlain was determined to prove his versatility and did stage work in musicals and dramas, moving to England in the late 1960s. He even played Hamlet in repertory. By the time he appeared in The Slipper and the Rose he was a familiar performer in British films and television, and his American stardom was expected to be an asset for the film. According to publicity for The Slipper and the Rose, Irish-born singer and actress Gemma Craven was cast as Cinderella after a year-long search, during which producers considered eighty-five actresses for the role. It was her film debut. Though she went on to have an impressive career in Britain on the stage and in television, The Slipper and the Rose proved to be her most substantial film role. Her portrayal of Cinderella is sweet, but not saccharine, and she displays a more complex personality than the one-note heroines in other versions of the tale. Supporting the attractive romantic leads were some of Britain's legendary acting greats, singing and dancing in comic gem performances: Edith Evans then 87, in her penultimate role was the dotty dowager Queen Mother; Kenneth More played the officious Lord High Chamberlain, aptly described by the prince as "the ever unctuous"; Margaret Lockwood was an icy-chic wicked stepmother; and Annette Crosbie sparkled as the overworked fairy godmother. As the King, veteran actor Michael Hordern, all bumbling dignity, leads a Rockettes-kicking chorus line of 3elderly ministers singing the comic song "Protocoligorically Correct."< br> Visually, The Slipper and the Rose is fairytale-gorgeous. The company spent several weeks filming on location at two castles near Salzburg, Austria, where The Sound of Music had been filmed, as well as in Salzburg itself. Even before principal production began, director Bryan Forbes and crew had filmed some exteriors of winter scenes in the nearby Bavarian mountains. The interiors were shot at Pinewood Studios outside London, re-creating the elaborate interiors of Austrian and German castles of the appropriate era. One of the loveliest re-creations had nothing to do with royal grandeur. A scene near the end of the film of a sad Cinderella on a flower-bedecked garden swing is an homage to the famous 18th century Fragonard painting, "The Swing," with Cinderella in a pink dress and hat copied from that artwork.

The Slipper and the Rose


The Slipper and the Rose (1976) was a reimagining of the classic "Cinderella" fairy tale by Charles Perrault, directed by Bryan Forbes. It starred Gemma Craven as Cinderella, Richard Chamberlain as the Prince, and a host of respected British actors, including Michael Hordern, Edith Evans, Kenneth More, and Annette Crosbie.

The songs were by Richard and Robert Sherman, most famous for writing for Disney films like Mary Poppins (1964) and The Jungle Book (1967), who also co-wrote the script with Forbes, and supposedly, talk show host David Frost, who was the executive producer.

Chamberlain plays Prince Edward of Euphania, who refuses an arranged marriage to the Princess Selena, telling his parents (Hordern and Lally Bowers) that when he marries, it will be for love, not politics. Cinderella (Craven), mourning the death of her father, is forced to act as servant to her stepmother (Margaret Lockwood) and her evil stepsisters Isobella (Rosalind Ayres) and Palatine (Sherrie Hewson). Edward's parents hold a ball for their son to meet and become engaged to one of the princesses from neighboring kingdoms, but few of them accept the invitation. Instead, local noblemen and women are invited, including Isobella and Palatine. Through the magic of Cinderella's fairy godmother (Crosbie), Cinderella is transformed from rags to riches - but only until midnight.

The film was chosen by the Royal Family to be shown at the Royal Command Performance on March 24, 1976, where the Queen Mother told the Sherman Brothers, "The waltz you wrote for the ballroom scene is the most beautiful song I've ever heard." When the film was released in the United States by Universal, the songs "What Has Love Got to Do with Being Married?" and "I Can't Forget the Melody" were cut from the film and the US soundtrack.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences viewers nominated the Sherman brothers for Best Music, Original Song for the waltz the Queen Mother loved, "The Slipper and the Rose Waltz (He Danced With Me/She Danced With Me)". They were also nominated for Best Music, Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Best Adaptation Score (with Angela Morley), as well as a Golden Globe. The film was later made into a stage show in 1984, and still plays occasionally.

By Lorraine LoBianco

SOURCES:
The Internet Movie Database
"Robert Sherman" The Telegraph 6 Mar 12

The Slipper and the Rose

The Slipper and the Rose (1976) was a reimagining of the classic "Cinderella" fairy tale by Charles Perrault, directed by Bryan Forbes. It starred Gemma Craven as Cinderella, Richard Chamberlain as the Prince, and a host of respected British actors, including Michael Hordern, Edith Evans, Kenneth More, and Annette Crosbie. The songs were by Richard and Robert Sherman, most famous for writing for Disney films like Mary Poppins (1964) and The Jungle Book (1967), who also co-wrote the script with Forbes, and supposedly, talk show host David Frost, who was the executive producer. Chamberlain plays Prince Edward of Euphania, who refuses an arranged marriage to the Princess Selena, telling his parents (Hordern and Lally Bowers) that when he marries, it will be for love, not politics. Cinderella (Craven), mourning the death of her father, is forced to act as servant to her stepmother (Margaret Lockwood) and her evil stepsisters Isobella (Rosalind Ayres) and Palatine (Sherrie Hewson). Edward's parents hold a ball for their son to meet and become engaged to one of the princesses from neighboring kingdoms, but few of them accept the invitation. Instead, local noblemen and women are invited, including Isobella and Palatine. Through the magic of Cinderella's fairy godmother (Crosbie), Cinderella is transformed from rags to riches - but only until midnight. The film was chosen by the Royal Family to be shown at the Royal Command Performance on March 24, 1976, where the Queen Mother told the Sherman Brothers, "The waltz you wrote for the ballroom scene is the most beautiful song I've ever heard." When the film was released in the United States by Universal, the songs "What Has Love Got to Do with Being Married?" and "I Can't Forget the Melody" were cut from the film and the US soundtrack. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences viewers nominated the Sherman brothers for Best Music, Original Song for the waltz the Queen Mother loved, "The Slipper and the Rose Waltz (He Danced With Me/She Danced With Me)". They were also nominated for Best Music, Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Best Adaptation Score (with Angela Morley), as well as a Golden Globe. The film was later made into a stage show in 1984, and still plays occasionally. By Lorraine LoBianco SOURCES: The Internet Movie Database "Robert Sherman" The Telegraph 6 Mar 12

Quotes

You're not meant to understand it. You're meant to accept it. Graciously.
- Fairy Godmother
I suppose I shall simply have to rise to the occasion and do something spectacular yet again. It was the same with Snow White. All the same, you young girls: never do as you're told! Men are MUCH easier.
- Fairy Godmother
And in my happiness, I forgive you all!
- Cinderella
Forgive me? How *dare* she forgive me?
- Stepmother
He can write what he likes, so long as he clears this room. There are too many people in it by far. Most of them not worth the candle.
- Dowager Queen
No one will recognize you for what you are. People seldom do.
- Fairy Godmother

Trivia

the glass slipper herald.

The dog in the film was the director's own dog, Fred.

Miscellaneous Notes

The United Kingdom

Released in United States 1976

Released in United States March 1976

Released in United States 1976

Released in United States March 1976 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (Opening Night Gala Opening) March 18-31, 1976.)