Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit


1h 49m 1993

Brief Synopsis

Deloris Van Cartier, now a headliner in Las Vegas, is persuaded by the good sisters to return to her inner city alma mater, St. Francis High, to go undercover as the new music teacher.

Film Details

Also Known As
En värsting till syster 2, Sister Act: acte 2
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Music
Sequel
Religion
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
San Francisco, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Synopsis

Deloris Van Cartier, now a headliner in Las Vegas, is persuaded by the good sisters to return to her inner city alma mater, St. Francis High, to go undercover as the new music teacher.

Crew

John Agalsoff

Video Playback

Lisa Alexander

Assistant Sound Editor

Petra Alexandria

Assistant

Arthur Altman

Song

Tom Altobello

Assistant Property Master

Tina Andrews

Screenplay (Uncredited)

Tina Andrews

Other

Nickolas Ashford

Song

Petra Bach

Adr Supervisor

Marc Baird

Visual Effects

James Barber

Assistant Camera Operator

William D Barber

Camera Operator

Bruce Barbour

Stunts

Robert Bateman

Song

Richard Benedetto

Lighting

Carissa Blix

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Will Blount

Property Master

Nandi Bowe

Assistant Director

Jeffrey S Bradley

Assistant Editor

Joseph Broussard

Song

Deanna Brown

Song

Deirdra Brown

Song

Vinnie Brown

Song

Yamma Brown

Song

Brandon Camp

Assistant

D A Carlin

Song

Daniel Allen Carlin

Music Supervisor

John N Carter

Editor

Oscar Castro-neves

Music Arranger

Mandy Chamberlin

Costumes

Aleta Chappelle

Casting

Wade Chinoy

Assistant

Carl Ciarfalio

Stunts

Jeff Clark

Sound Editor

Robert Clivilles

Song

Kevin Cloud

Song

Hugh Conlon

Construction Coordinator

Scott Conrad

Editor

Lauren Cory

Set Designer

Mary Courtney

Production Coordinator

Jimmy Crawford

Lighting Technician

Roy Crayton

Song

Jim Cruickshank

Screenplay

Candace Crump

Stand-In

Candace Crump

Stunts

Paul Dallas

Stunts

Bridget D Davis

Assistant

Jay Davis

Key Rigging Grip

Zack Davis

Adr Editor

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

John De Cuir

Production Designer

Autry Dewalt

Song

Georgia Dobbins

Song

Lamont Dozier

Song

Darrol Durant

Song Performer

Bernard Edwards

Song

Gregg Elam

Stunt Coordinator

Gregg Elam

Stunts

Joe Esposito

Song

Charles R. Eulo

Production Assistant

Dominic Fidelibus

Other

Nancy Fogarty

Music Editor

John Fogerty

Song

Aretha Franklin

Song Performer

Jim Fredburg

Special Effects Supervisor

Charles Gabriel

Song

Kenneth Gamble

Song

William Garrett

Song

Marvin Gaye

Song

Michael Germain

Makeup Supervisor

David Gertz

Foley Mixer

Sandy Getzler

Set Designer

Bruce Gibeson

Set Decorator

Jill Rene Gilbert

Assistant

Zak Gilbert

Stunts

Dawn Gilliam

Script Supervisor

Norman Gimbel

Song

Keir Gist

Song

Martin Glover

Camera

Whoopi Goldberg

Song

Whoopi Goldberg

Song Performer

Robert J Goldstein

Location Manager

Miles Goodman

Music

Berry Gordy

Song

Freddie Gorman

Song

Lynette Graves

Production Assistant

Bonnie Greenberg

Audio Consultant

Karen Dale Greene

Apprentice

Moonstar Greene

Assistant Editor

Hilbert Hakim

Assistant Director

William D Hall

Music

Suzanne Hanover

Photography

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

James Harris

Song

Jim Harrison

Music Editor

Edwin Hawkins

Song

Craig P Herring

Assistant Editor

Pem Herring

Editor

Lauryn Hill

Song

Lauryn Hill

Song Performer

Edward Hokenson

Song

Brian Holland

Song

Edward Holland

Song

Beth Horton

Camera Assistant

Joseph Howard

Characters As Source Material

David J Hudson

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Leon Huff

Song

Ivy Joe Hunter

Song

Charles Martin Inouye

Music Editor

Mario Iscovich

Executive Producer

Anthony Jackson

Song

Sydney James

Consultant

Sydney James

Song

Francine Jamison-tanchuck

Costume Designer

Ron Johnson

Song Performer

Ron Johnson

Song

Adam Johnston

Sound Editor

Dale Johnston

Sound Editor

Melvin Jones

Stunts

Devin Kamin

Song Performer

Devin Kamin

Song

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Jamie Kehoe

Craft Service

Daryl Kell

Music

Glenn Kershaw

Dp/Cinematographer

Glenn Kershaw

Director Of Photography

David Kincaid

Stunts

Robin Kolb

Foreman

Darlene Koldenhoven

Music Contractor

Steve Lambert

Stunts

Eric Layne

Accountant

Randy Legaspi

Other

Terry Lewis

Song

Kevin Lindstrom

Assistant Editor

Frederick Long

Song

Sergio Lopez-rivera

Assistant

Joseph Magee

Rerecording

Bill Manger

Sound Editor

Louis Mann

Art Director

Laurence Mark

Executive Producer

Harrison Marsh

Boom Operator

C D Martin

Song

Judi Ann Mason

Music

Judi Ann Mason

Screenplay

Denver Mattson

Stunts

Paul Mauriat

Song

Louis Mawcinitt

Lighting

Jay Mccarthy

Stunts

Van Mccoy

Song

Christopher Meledandri

Co-Executive Producer

Mel Metcalfe

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Michael Mikita

Other

Alphonso Mizell

Song

Paul Moen

Unit Production Manager

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

James Moriana

Foley Artist

Ted Moser

Transportation Captain

Joel Moss

Music

Robert Munoz

Key Grip

Jack L. Murray

Production Supervisor

Kathy Nagata

Accounting Assistant

David Orr

Color Timer

James Orr

Screenplay

Noon Orsatti

Stunts

Phillip W Palmer

Other

George Papanickolas

Dolly Grip

Paisley Pappe

Assistant Editor

Stuart H Pappe

Editor

Fred Parris

Song

Peter Pav

Production Assistant

Marshall Peck

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Victor Perez

Rigging Gaffer

Frederick Perren

Song

Dan Perri

Main Title Design

E D Perry

Production Assistant

Michael Peters

Choreographer

Caryl Pine

Other

Carlos Pinero

Dga Trainee

Jacques Plante

Song

Lee Pockress

Song

Terry Porter

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Franck Pourcel

Song

Kelly Quinn

Adr Editor

Monica Ragan

Assistant Property Master

Brian Rankel

Assistant

Otis Redding

Song

Deke Richards

Song

Angela Terry Robinson

Assistant Editor

Eartha Robinson

Choreographer

William Robinson Jr.

Song

Nile Rodgers

Song

Bill Roe

Camera Operator

Tim Roe

Assistant Camera Operator

Pat Romano

Stunts

Frank Rose

Set Costumer

Christina Royster

Production Assistant

Scott Rudin

Producer

Pamela Sawyer

Song

Carol Schwartz

Makeup Artist

Marc Shaiman

Associate Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
En värsting till syster 2, Sister Act: acte 2
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Music
Sequel
Religion
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
San Francisco, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Articles

Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)


Robert Pastorelli, the rough and ready actor best known to television viewers for his portrayal of the devilish but lovable house painter Eldin on the long-running CBS comedy Murphy Brown (1988-97), was found dead on March 8 in his Hollywood Hills home. Authorities believe the cause of death was a drug overdose. He was 49.

Born on June 21, 1954 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Pastorelli had dreams of becoming a boxer, but when he was just 19, he was involved in a near fatal car accident that forced him to choose another career. By the late '70s, he chose acting. After doing some theater in New York, Pastorelli found work on both television: Barney Miller, Cagney & Lacey, Hill Street Blues; and film: Outrageous Fortune, Beverly Hills Cop II (both 1987), where his beefy frame and Runyonesque demeanor almost always had him play thugs and hoodlums.

In 1988, he found fame when he was cast opposite Candice Bergen as Eldin, the house painter who could never quite finish the job in Murphy Brown. Pastorelli's likable raffishness countered well with Bergen's icy charms, and he stayed on for six seasons.

After Murphy Brown, Pastorelli continued to play variations of the streetwise character, but this time to considerable comic effect in films like: Sister Act 2 (1994), Eraser, and Michael (both 1996). He returned to television impressively when he starred in the short-lived, but critically lauded Americanized version of the British Television hit Cracker. Pastorelli had just completed work on the Get Shorty (1995) sequel Be Cool with John Travolta, which is scheduled for release later this year. He is survived by a daughter.

by Michael T. Toole
Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)

Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)

Robert Pastorelli, the rough and ready actor best known to television viewers for his portrayal of the devilish but lovable house painter Eldin on the long-running CBS comedy Murphy Brown (1988-97), was found dead on March 8 in his Hollywood Hills home. Authorities believe the cause of death was a drug overdose. He was 49. Born on June 21, 1954 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Pastorelli had dreams of becoming a boxer, but when he was just 19, he was involved in a near fatal car accident that forced him to choose another career. By the late '70s, he chose acting. After doing some theater in New York, Pastorelli found work on both television: Barney Miller, Cagney & Lacey, Hill Street Blues; and film: Outrageous Fortune, Beverly Hills Cop II (both 1987), where his beefy frame and Runyonesque demeanor almost always had him play thugs and hoodlums. In 1988, he found fame when he was cast opposite Candice Bergen as Eldin, the house painter who could never quite finish the job in Murphy Brown. Pastorelli's likable raffishness countered well with Bergen's icy charms, and he stayed on for six seasons. After Murphy Brown, Pastorelli continued to play variations of the streetwise character, but this time to considerable comic effect in films like: Sister Act 2 (1994), Eraser, and Michael (both 1996). He returned to television impressively when he starred in the short-lived, but critically lauded Americanized version of the British Television hit Cracker. Pastorelli had just completed work on the Get Shorty (1995) sequel Be Cool with John Travolta, which is scheduled for release later this year. He is survived by a daughter. by Michael T. Toole

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video July 13, 1994

Released in United States Winter December 10, 1993

Began shooting May 24, 1993.

Completed shooting August 20, 1993.

Released in United States on Video July 13, 1994

Released in United States Winter December 10, 1993