Sidewalk Stories


1h 37m 1989
Sidewalk Stories

Brief Synopsis

A street artist takes in a baby whose father has been murdered.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1989
Production Company
Recorded Releasing Company
Distribution Company
Island Pictures; Island Pictures; Nikkatsu Corporation
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

A silent, Chaplinesque comedy about a New York street artist who befriends an orphaned girl and in turn becomes one of the city's homeless.

Crew

Thomas Alpern

Casting Assistant

Mary-jane April

Casting

Paul Birk

Gaffer

Howard M Brickner

Executive Producer

Alan Champion

Assistant (To Charles Lane)

Paul Cote

Sound Mixer

Neil Danziger

Boom Operator

Don Davis

Generator Operator

Bill Dill

Director Of Photography

Cas Donovan

Assistant Director

Michael Stephen Ferrari

Electrician

George Gibson

2nd Assistant Camera

Nick Gomez

Assistant Editor

Ashley Gould

Casting Assistant

Crystal Griffith

1st Additional Assistant Camera

Pamela Hochschartner

Production Coordinator

Pamela Hochschartner

Production Manager Assistant

Lida A Johnson

Makeup

Lida A Johnson

Hairstyles

Stephanie Klapper

Casting

Todd Klein

Grip

Jeff Kushner

Assistant Editor

Charles Lane

Screenwriter

Charles Lane

Editor

Charles Lane

Producer

Lisa Leavitt

Stills

Vicki Lebenbaum

Executive Producer

Scott Leckie

Key Production Assistant

Laura Lesser

Script Consultant

Herb Lieberz

Transportation Captain

Marc Marder

Score Recording

Marc Marder

Music Producer

Marc Marder

Original Music

Peter Marzulli

Electrician

Ina Mayhew

Art Direction

Jody O'neil

1st Assistant Director

Felix Olivier

Locations Assistant

Frank Pace

Grip

Lyn Pinezich

Production Designer

Tom Potoskie

Electrician

Jeff Pullman

Associate Producer

Christopher Quinn

Production Manager

Christopher Quinn

Associate Producer

Sally Reed

Grip

Grant Reid

Location Manager

Grant Reid

Unit Manager

Douglas W Shannon

Grip

Anuradha Sharma

Key Production Assistant

Anne Stein

Editor

Eileen Strakov

Animal Trainer (Horseback)

Rick Stribling

Key Grip

Linda Sundmark

Animal Trainer (Dog)

Jane Tabachnick

Wardrobe Designer

Nancy Taylor

Script Supervisor

Rachael Weinzimer

Assistant Editor

Rachael Weinzimer

Art Department Assistant

Alan Wolfe

1st Assistant Camera

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1989
Production Company
Recorded Releasing Company
Distribution Company
Island Pictures; Island Pictures; Nikkatsu Corporation
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Sidewalk Stories


Produced by Rhinoceros Productions and distributed by Island Pictures, Sidewalk Stories (1989) starred Charles Lane (who also directed, produced, wrote, and edited the film) is an homage to Charles Chaplin's The Kid (1921), although not, according to Lane, a remake. Sidewalk Stories was a silent, black and white film shot in only fifteen days on a shoestring budget of $200,000, financed by Lane's lawyer, Howard Brickner and his wife Vicki Lebenbaum after taking out a second mortgage on their house.

The film is a comment on urban homelessness, a topic just as timely now as then (or, indeed when Chaplin made The Kid ). A Greenwich Village street artist (Lane) who sketches portraits and is squatting in a condemned building, takes in a toddler (Lane's real-life daughter, Nicole Alysia) whose father has been murdered. Also in the cast were Sandye Wilson as "Young Woman", Darnell Williams as "Father" and Tula Hoosier as "Mother."

Sidewalk Stories was inspired by an encounter and conversation that Lane had with a homeless man after leaving the Sugar Ray Leonard - Donny Lalonde fight. "I had been thinking about making a film about a serious issue embodied in a social comedy, and Sidewalk Stories was born out of that." Lane later said.

The film was made in February 1989, after a two-week rehearsal, because it was the coldest winter to date in New York City. "We were filming in 2-degree weather. There was no time to improvise." Only two weeks after filming wrapped, Lane submitted a cut of the film for submission to the Cannes Film Festival and was accepted. On May 11th, it screened at Cannes, which Lane found to be "agony" because some people walked out and he couldn't tell if those who remained liked the film or not. At the end, however, the applause lasted for fifteen minutes, which moved Lane to tears. He would later walk away with the Prix du Publique award and go on to win awards from several countries, including Sweden and Spain.

The film equally won acclaim from critics when it opened in New York on November 3, 1989 and Los Angeles a week later. Janet Maslin wrote in The New York Times that while the film was sentimental, "it is saved from seeming saccharine by the hard facts of modern life." While watching Sidewalk Stories , Roger Ebert was fascinated at how watching a silent film heightened his attention. "I think perhaps the silent format inspires us to participate more directly in the movie. A sound film comes to us, approaches us - indeed, it sometimes assaults us from the screen. But a silent film stays up there on the glowing wall, and we rise up to meet it. We take our imagination and join it with the imagination of the filmmaker."

SOURCES:
Dudek, Duane "Sidewalk Director Speaks Up" The Milwaukee Sentinel 19 Jan 90
http://www.afi.com/members/catalog/DetailView.aspx?s=&Movie=58286
http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/sidewalk-stories-1990
Johnson, Melinda "Director of 'Sidewalk Stories' to discuss his silent film at Syracuse International Film Festival" 3 Oct 14
Maslin, Janet "Chaplinesque Artist and Waif Among the Homeless" The New York Times 3 Nov 89
Matthews, Jack "The Sound of Applause Greets Lane's New Silent Movie" The Los Angeles Times 23 Nov 89
Sidewalk Stories

Sidewalk Stories

Produced by Rhinoceros Productions and distributed by Island Pictures, Sidewalk Stories (1989) starred Charles Lane (who also directed, produced, wrote, and edited the film) is an homage to Charles Chaplin's The Kid (1921), although not, according to Lane, a remake. Sidewalk Stories was a silent, black and white film shot in only fifteen days on a shoestring budget of $200,000, financed by Lane's lawyer, Howard Brickner and his wife Vicki Lebenbaum after taking out a second mortgage on their house. The film is a comment on urban homelessness, a topic just as timely now as then (or, indeed when Chaplin made The Kid ). A Greenwich Village street artist (Lane) who sketches portraits and is squatting in a condemned building, takes in a toddler (Lane's real-life daughter, Nicole Alysia) whose father has been murdered. Also in the cast were Sandye Wilson as "Young Woman", Darnell Williams as "Father" and Tula Hoosier as "Mother." Sidewalk Stories was inspired by an encounter and conversation that Lane had with a homeless man after leaving the Sugar Ray Leonard - Donny Lalonde fight. "I had been thinking about making a film about a serious issue embodied in a social comedy, and Sidewalk Stories was born out of that." Lane later said. The film was made in February 1989, after a two-week rehearsal, because it was the coldest winter to date in New York City. "We were filming in 2-degree weather. There was no time to improvise." Only two weeks after filming wrapped, Lane submitted a cut of the film for submission to the Cannes Film Festival and was accepted. On May 11th, it screened at Cannes, which Lane found to be "agony" because some people walked out and he couldn't tell if those who remained liked the film or not. At the end, however, the applause lasted for fifteen minutes, which moved Lane to tears. He would later walk away with the Prix du Publique award and go on to win awards from several countries, including Sweden and Spain. The film equally won acclaim from critics when it opened in New York on November 3, 1989 and Los Angeles a week later. Janet Maslin wrote in The New York Times that while the film was sentimental, "it is saved from seeming saccharine by the hard facts of modern life." While watching Sidewalk Stories , Roger Ebert was fascinated at how watching a silent film heightened his attention. "I think perhaps the silent format inspires us to participate more directly in the movie. A sound film comes to us, approaches us - indeed, it sometimes assaults us from the screen. But a silent film stays up there on the glowing wall, and we rise up to meet it. We take our imagination and join it with the imagination of the filmmaker." SOURCES: Dudek, Duane "Sidewalk Director Speaks Up" The Milwaukee Sentinel 19 Jan 90 http://www.afi.com/members/catalog/DetailView.aspx?s=&Movie=58286 http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/sidewalk-stories-1990 Johnson, Melinda "Director of 'Sidewalk Stories' to discuss his silent film at Syracuse International Film Festival" 3 Oct 14 Maslin, Janet "Chaplinesque Artist and Waif Among the Homeless" The New York Times 3 Nov 89 Matthews, Jack "The Sound of Applause Greets Lane's New Silent Movie" The Los Angeles Times 23 Nov 89

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1989

Released in United States 2013

Released in United States April 2000

Released in United States August 26, 1989

Released in United States December 1989

Released in United States Fall November 3, 1989

Released in United States June 1990

Released in United States May 1989

Released in United States November 10, 1989

Released in United States October 11, 1989

Released in United States October 1989

Released in United States October 28, 1989

Released in United States September 1989

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (Directors Fortnight) May 18 & 19, 1989.

Shown at Festival dei Popoli Florence December 7-10. 1989.

Shown at Greater Fort Lauderdale Film Festival October 28, 1989.

Shown at Independent Feature Film Market (IFFM) in New York City October 4-13, 1989.

Shown at Mill Valley Film Festival October 11, 1989.

Shown at Munich Film Festival June 24-July 2, 1989.

Shown at San Sebastian Film Festival September 15-23, 1989.

Shown at Sydney Film Festival June 8-22, 1990.

Shown at the Overlooked Film Festival in Champaign Illinois, April 26-30, 2000.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 15 & 16, 1989.

Released in United States 1989 (Shown at Munich Film Festival June 24-July 2, 1989.)

Released in United States 2013 (Special Screening)

Released in United States April 2000 (Shown at the Overlooked Film Festival in Champaign Illinois, April 26-30, 2000.)

Released in United States May 1989 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (Directors Fortnight) May 18 & 19, 1989.)

Released in United States June 1990 (Shown at Sydney Film Festival June 8-22, 1990.)

Released in United States August 26, 1989 (Shown at Vevey International Festival of Comedy Films August 26, 1989.)

Released in United States Fall November 3, 1989

Released in United States October 11, 1989 (Shown at Mill Valley Film Festival October 11, 1989.)

Began shooting February 10, 1989.

Released in United States October 28, 1989 (Shown at Greater Fort Lauderdale Film Festival October 28, 1989.)

Bill Dill replaced Ron Fortunato as director of photography.

Released in United States September 1989 (Shown at San Sebastian Film Festival September 15-23, 1989.)

Shown at Vevey International Festival of Comedy Films August 26, 1989.

Broadcast over PBS on "American Playhouse" May 16, 1990.

Released in United States December 1989 (Shown at Festival dei Popoli Florence December 7-10. 1989.)

Released in United States October 1989 (Shown at Independent Feature Film Market (IFFM) in New York City October 4-13, 1989.)

Completed shooting February 28, 1989.

Released in United States September 1989 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 15 & 16, 1989.)

Released in United States November 10, 1989 (Los Angeles)