Side Street


1h 23m 1950
Side Street

Brief Synopsis

A New York City mailman is chased by both cops and crooks when he steals a shipment of dirty money.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Crime
Film Noir
Release Date
Dec 14, 1950
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Joe Norson, an expectant father and a New York City postman of modest means, dreams of having enough money to take his wife Ellen to Europe. One day, while on his mail delivery route, Joe, frustrated by his inability to provide for his wife and future family, steals $30,000 from the office of disreputable lawyer Victor Backett. Unknown to Joe, the $30,000 was blackmail payoff money that Backett extorted from Emil Lorrison, an innocent man who was framed in a sex scandal by the crooked lawyer. Backett later kills Lorrison and dumps his body in the East River. Joe, meanwhile, tries to explain his sudden wealth by telling Ellen that he has taken a lucrative job in Schenectady. For safekeeping, Joe packages the money and leaves it with his pal Nick Drumman, a bartender. A short time later, Ellen gives birth to a baby boy, and Joe, feeling remorse for the theft, decides to return the stolen money. Backett, however, suspects that Joe is trying to trap him, and refuses to accept the money until he does a background check on Joe. Backett later sends his accomplice, Georgie Garsell, to abduct Joe and get the package, but when Garsell opens it, he discrovers that the money is missing. When Garsell learns that Nick has absconded with the $30,000, he kills the bartender and recovers the money. Joe is later sought by the police for Nick's murder, but he eludes capture and goes to the hospital where Ellen is recuperating from childbirth. There, Joe explains the story to his wife, and she urges him to surrender himself to the police. Joe, however, refuses to do so but Garsell sets a trap for him and enlists the aid of his cab driver friend, Larry Giff, to kill Joe and dump his body in the river. En route to the location where they intend to murder Joe, Garsell and Giff are followed by police Captain Walter Anderson, and a chase ensues. In a desperate move to end the chase, Joe grabs the steering wheel of the taxi and deliberately crashes it. Garsell is shot and killed while trying to escape, but Joe lives to tell the truth to the police.

Cast

Farley Granger

Joe Norson

Cathy O'donnell

Ellen Norson

James Craig

Georgie Garsell

Paul Kelly

Captain Walter Anderson

Jean Hagen

Harriet Sinton

Paul Harvey

Emil Lorrison

Edmon Ryan

Victor Backett

Charles Mcgraw

Stanley Simon

Ed Max

Nick Drumman

Adele Jergens

Lucille "Lucky" Colner

Harry Bellaver

Larry Giff

Whit Bissell

Harold Simpsen

John Gallaudet

Gus Heldon

Esther Somers

Mrs. Malby

Harry Antrim

Mr. Malby

George Tyne

Detective Roffman

Kathryn Givney

Miss Carter

King Donovan

Gottschalk

Norman Leavitt

Pete Stanton

Sid Tomack

Louie

Joe Verdi

Vendor

Don Terranova

Patrolman

James Westerfield

Patrolman

Gail Bonney

Woman's voice

Margie Liszt

Woman's voice

Brett King

Pigeon man

Peter Thompson

Mickey

John A. Butler

Elevator man

Herbert Vigran

Photographer

Robert Malcolm

Charlie, a police officer

Paul Marion

Dave

William Ruhl

Manny

Ransom Sherman

Superintendent

Ruth Warren

Housekeeper

Eula Guy

Florence

Edmund Glover

Fingerprint expert

William Hansen

Dr. Harry Sternberg

Tom Mcelhany

Newsboy

Jack Diamond

Bum

George David

Syrian proprietor

Don Haggerty

Rivers

Mildred Wall

Mrs. Glickburn

Angi O. Poulos

Ahmed

Albert Morin

Ismet Kimal

Peter De Bear

Tommy Drummon, Jr.

Bee Humphries

Mrs. Farnol

Sarah Selby

Nurse Williams

Margaret Brayton

Clerk

Charles Mcavoy

Bank guard

George Lynn

Frank, a technician

John Maxwell

Monitor's voice

Nolan Leary

Doorman

Ralph Riggs

Proprietor

Marie Crisis

Headwaitress

Lynn Millan

Hatcheck girl

David Wolfe

Smitty

Ralph Montgomery

Milkman

Minerva Urecal

Landlady

Ollie O'toole

Voice

Walter Craig

Radio clerk

Helen Eby-rock

Mother

Frank Conlan

Night elevator operator

John Phillips

Detective

Ellen Lowe

Mrs. Rivers

James O'neill

Priest

W. P. Mcwatters

Ben Cooper

Bobo, A Dog

Photo Collections

Side Street - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from MGM's Side Street (1950), starring Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Crime
Film Noir
Release Date
Dec 14, 1950
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

Side Street (1950)


New York City postal worker Joe Norson (Farley Granger) wants nothing more than to provide a comfortable life for himself and his wife (Cathy O'Donnell), who is pregnant. Out of frustration he steals $30,000 from the shady lawyer Victor Backett (Edmon Ryan). However, the theft has higher stakes than Joe could have imagined: Backett extorted the money from Emil Lorrison (Paul Harvey), an innocent man whom he framed in a sex scandal and later murdered. Joe, trying to hide the money from his wife, gives it to his friend Nick Drumman (Edwin Max) for safekeeping. When Joe attempts to retrieve the money and return it to Backett, he finds himself caught up in a web of murder and his own life is in danger.

Cinematographer Joseph Ruttenberg (1889-1983) was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, and emigrated to the U.S. as a child. He worked as a newspaper boy in Boston, later becoming a news photographer and newsreel cameraman. Starting in 1916, he worked with Fox in New York, following the mass exodus to Hollywood in 1926. In collaboration with George Folsey (who received sole credit), he shot one of the key films of the early sound era: Rouben Mamoulian's musical Applause (1929). In 1935 he began a long and prodigious career at MGM, where he was associated with some of its most prestigious productions, among them: The Women (1939), The Philadelphia Story (1940), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941), Gaslight (1944) Brigadoon (1954) - Ruttenberg was an early champion of CinemaScope - and Butterfield 8 (1960). His Academy Awards include The Great Waltz (1938), Mrs. Miniver (1942), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) and Gigi (1958). Ruttenberg's cinematography for Side Street (1950), which has often been described as "semi-documentary," captures the New York locations with striking realism for the era. At the same time, the film's lighting scheme, as critic Jeanine Basinger has noted, becomes increasingly expressionistic, reflecting the protagonist's descent into a world of moral darkness.

Director Anthony Mann (1907-1967) is best known for his Westerns of the 1950s and '60s, but he also made several remarkable films noir in the late 1940s - most notably T-Men (1947) and Raw Deal (1948), both photographed by the great John Alton. As with his first MGM feature, Border Incident (1949), Mann proves himself to be a master of portraying the physical environment as a staging ground for both the internal and external conflicts which unfold. Here his direction effectively suggests the characters' sense of entrapment within the urban landscape, often via striking aerial shots. Incidentally, according to an article in the New York Times, the climactic stunt in which a taxicab was supposed to flip on its side in front of the J. P. Morgan Building had to be repeated several times, since the taxicab kept failing to flip properly.

Although Side Street had a mixed critical reception at the time of its release, its stock has since risen both within Anthony Mann's filmography and as a representative film noir of the era. Variety rightly praised Ruttenberg's cinematography and the work of the supporting actors, in particular Jean Hagen as an alcoholic torch singer. The redoubtable Bosley Crowther of the New York Times wrote of the film: "It can only be fully recommended to those who have a deep and morbid interest in crime." Perhaps Mr. Crowther didn't approve, but today's viewers almost certainly will.

Producer: Sam Zimbalist
Director: Anthony Mann
Screenwriter: Sydney Boehm
Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg
Editing: Conrad A. Nervig
Music: Lennie Hayton. Music and lyrics of song "Easy to Love" by Cole Porter
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons and Daniel B. Cathcart
Cast: Farley Granger (Joe Norson), Cathy O'Donnell (Ellen Norson), James Craig (Georgie Garsell), Paul Kelly (Captain Walter Anderson), Jean Hagen (Harriet Sinton), Paul Harvey (Emil Lorrison), Edmon Ryan (Victor Backett), Charles McGraw (Stanley Simon), Edwin Max (Nick Drumman).
BW-83m.

by James Steffen
Side Street (1950)

Side Street (1950)

New York City postal worker Joe Norson (Farley Granger) wants nothing more than to provide a comfortable life for himself and his wife (Cathy O'Donnell), who is pregnant. Out of frustration he steals $30,000 from the shady lawyer Victor Backett (Edmon Ryan). However, the theft has higher stakes than Joe could have imagined: Backett extorted the money from Emil Lorrison (Paul Harvey), an innocent man whom he framed in a sex scandal and later murdered. Joe, trying to hide the money from his wife, gives it to his friend Nick Drumman (Edwin Max) for safekeeping. When Joe attempts to retrieve the money and return it to Backett, he finds himself caught up in a web of murder and his own life is in danger. Cinematographer Joseph Ruttenberg (1889-1983) was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, and emigrated to the U.S. as a child. He worked as a newspaper boy in Boston, later becoming a news photographer and newsreel cameraman. Starting in 1916, he worked with Fox in New York, following the mass exodus to Hollywood in 1926. In collaboration with George Folsey (who received sole credit), he shot one of the key films of the early sound era: Rouben Mamoulian's musical Applause (1929). In 1935 he began a long and prodigious career at MGM, where he was associated with some of its most prestigious productions, among them: The Women (1939), The Philadelphia Story (1940), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941), Gaslight (1944) Brigadoon (1954) - Ruttenberg was an early champion of CinemaScope - and Butterfield 8 (1960). His Academy Awards include The Great Waltz (1938), Mrs. Miniver (1942), Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) and Gigi (1958). Ruttenberg's cinematography for Side Street (1950), which has often been described as "semi-documentary," captures the New York locations with striking realism for the era. At the same time, the film's lighting scheme, as critic Jeanine Basinger has noted, becomes increasingly expressionistic, reflecting the protagonist's descent into a world of moral darkness. Director Anthony Mann (1907-1967) is best known for his Westerns of the 1950s and '60s, but he also made several remarkable films noir in the late 1940s - most notably T-Men (1947) and Raw Deal (1948), both photographed by the great John Alton. As with his first MGM feature, Border Incident (1949), Mann proves himself to be a master of portraying the physical environment as a staging ground for both the internal and external conflicts which unfold. Here his direction effectively suggests the characters' sense of entrapment within the urban landscape, often via striking aerial shots. Incidentally, according to an article in the New York Times, the climactic stunt in which a taxicab was supposed to flip on its side in front of the J. P. Morgan Building had to be repeated several times, since the taxicab kept failing to flip properly. Although Side Street had a mixed critical reception at the time of its release, its stock has since risen both within Anthony Mann's filmography and as a representative film noir of the era. Variety rightly praised Ruttenberg's cinematography and the work of the supporting actors, in particular Jean Hagen as an alcoholic torch singer. The redoubtable Bosley Crowther of the New York Times wrote of the film: "It can only be fully recommended to those who have a deep and morbid interest in crime." Perhaps Mr. Crowther didn't approve, but today's viewers almost certainly will. Producer: Sam Zimbalist Director: Anthony Mann Screenwriter: Sydney Boehm Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg Editing: Conrad A. Nervig Music: Lennie Hayton. Music and lyrics of song "Easy to Love" by Cole Porter Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons and Daniel B. Cathcart Cast: Farley Granger (Joe Norson), Cathy O'Donnell (Ellen Norson), James Craig (Georgie Garsell), Paul Kelly (Captain Walter Anderson), Jean Hagen (Harriet Sinton), Paul Harvey (Emil Lorrison), Edmon Ryan (Victor Backett), Charles McGraw (Stanley Simon), Edwin Max (Nick Drumman). BW-83m. by James Steffen

They Live By Night/Side Street - A Film Noir Double Feature - Nicholas Ray's THEY LIVE BY NIGHT & Anthony Mann's SIDE STREET


Warners' Film Noir Classic Collection Vol 4 collects five thriller double bills probably classified in the 'Low "A"' to 'High "B"' range, encompassing titles from Warners, RKO and MGM with a Monogram oddity thrown in for good measure. This pairing links RKO's They Live By Night and MGM's Side Street, both starring Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell.

Nicholas Ray's first feature They Live By Night is the work of a Hollywood outsider. It's definitely Noir by theme and characterization, but is sourced in Edward Anderson's socially conscious Depression-era novel Thieves Like Us. A product of Roosevelt's New Deal public works programs, Ray was brought to Los Angeles by producer John Houseman and encouraged to place artistic goals first. With two young stars borrowed from Goldwyn, Ray made what might be Hollywood's darkest romance since the silent era.

Synopsis: Inexperienced Bowie Bowers (Farley Granger) escapes from jail with hardened criminals T-Dub and Chickamaw (Jay C. Flippen & Howard Da Silva) and is stashed at Mobley's filling station to recover from a wound. He's nursed by Mobley's teenaged daughter Keechie (Cathy O'Donnell). Despite the fact that neither has known anything but hardship and distrust, they begin a friendship. Bowie accompanies his cohorts on robberies and is soon being publicized as a bloodthirsty public enemy; Bowie and Keechie go on the run together and find that the underworld doesn't want loose-cannon hillbillies hanging around. They marry on the road, and Keechie becomes pregnant. When T-Dub and Chickamaw run into trouble, the young couple hide out at a motor hotel run by Mattie Mansfield (Helen Craig), who is bitter because her husband's parole has been denied. Bowie sneaks out to arrange their escape to Mexico.

They Live By Night is the most tender of films noir. It opens with a dreamy shot of lovers kissing by firelight, while the words, "This boy ... and this girl ... were never properly introduced to the world we live in" fade up on the screen. Keechie and Bowie share a sensitivity that transcends their miserable backgrounds. He's been in prison since childhood and she's turned cold and hostile to avoid further abuse from her drunken father. When Bowie returns from a robbery with a gift, we can see Keechie's heart melt. From then on they're like mated animals. Keechie's father is quick to inform on the lovers. The bull-like T-Dub and the hotheaded Chickamaw use threats to force Bowie into more bank robberies.

Ray concentrates on the couple's growing relationship. Keechie and Bowie gratefully accept whatever happiness they can find. Whenever they let down their guard and behave like 'real people', things go wrong. Bowie foolishly flashes his bankroll in front of strangers. A crooked marriage parlor operator (Ian Wolfe) can tell immediately that they're fugitives. The idea of 'honor among thieves' is revealed as a myth when crooks grossly overcharge them, and friends betray them to the police. Their situation is summed up by nightclub singer Marie Bryant's evocative delivery of Your Red Wagon, a creepy jazz tune that insists that one's problems are one's own, and it's no good expecting others to sympathize. Nicholas Ray's fine direction is just what Farley Granger needed -- he was never this good again, not even in his movies for Alfred Hitchcock. The much more natural performer Cathy O'Donnell is simply magnificent.

They Live By Night conjures powerful and memorable images, from its innovative helicopter shots to cameraman George Diskant's unusual character compositions. The lovers' happy faces fill the screen as they dream of the future, until the one-eyed Chickamaw shows up to demonstrate his menace by crushing Christmas ornaments. Not every scene happens at night, but those that do evoke the false sense of security when driving in a car, and the loneliness of being set adrift in a hostile world.

They Live By Night is the second of a string of very good rural bandit - amour fou movies roughly based on the Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow story. Fritz Lang's You Only Live Once is good cinema but forced in almost every respect. Joseph H. Lewis' Gun Crazy has a different blend of violence and out-of-control sexuality, and Robert Altman's Thieves Like Us has its good points as well. Arthur Penn's Bonnie & Clyde is a masterpiece in its own right but openly borrows from Nick Ray. The banker that leaps onto Clyde's running board and is shot in the face is clearly meant to one-up the They Live By Night moment when Bowie shoves the nice jeweler from his car window. A big part of our concern for Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty is the edgy knowledge that their demise will be bloody and graphic. At the end of They Live By Night, we wish we could throw ourselves in front of the police to shield the Romeo & Juliet-like Granger and O'Donnell.

The conclusion is as complex as noir films get, a beautiful distillation of the trauma of criminal life. The hard-faced Mattie betrays Keechie and Bowie in a pitiful bid to free her own husband from prison. The finale is somewhat idealized, but the Madonna-like grace afforded Keechie is emotionally very moving. I've never seen a showing of They Live By Night where people didn't applaud -- even back in college screenings.

The print of They Live By Night is nearly flawless, completely overshadowing the old Image laserdisc from the early 1990s. The nights are inky black and the image has very little grain. The interesting soundtrack highlights the music of Leigh Harline, and we're told that themes by Woody Guthrie can be heard as well.

A fast-paced featurette by Sparkhill, The Twisted Road has on-camera contributions from Molly Haskell, James Ursini, Alain Silver, Oliver Stone, Christopher Coppola and star Farley Granger. Granger returns with Eddie Muller in a feature commentary. The gracious actor is good with generalities but remembers few specific details, and many of Muller's patient questions receive four-word non-answers. Muller gives a fine account of the making of the film. We might assume that the helicopter footage indicates a Howard Hughes influence -- Hughes injected aviation into films whenever he could -- but They Live By Night was produced before Hughes came to the studio.

MGM made noir films but not a lot of great ones, perhaps because the studio's commitment to glamour worked against the noir ethos. Things changed a bit when Dore Schary imported Anthony Mann and John Alton from Eagle-Lion. The director and cameraman made an excellent team on Border Incident, but Alton may already have been working on An American in Paris by the time Side Street came around. Veteran Joseph Ruttenberg's camerawork is just as interesting.

Side Street is a derivative tale sparked by some fancy location shooting, particularly an exciting car chase in the narrow streets of Lower Manhattan. An opening narration imitates Jules Dassin's The Naked City, describing the daily cycle in New York while criminals are doing their dirty work. As if conceived as an elongated version of a moralizing Crime Doesn't Pay short subject, our hero is an innocent dupe who makes one foolish decision and becomes the target of ruthless killers.

Synopsis: Part-time mail carrier Joe Norson (Farley Granger) needs a real job to replace the filling station he lost; his young wife Ellen (Cathy O'Donnell) will have to give birth in the county hospital. Joe's dreaming of buying her a fur coat when he sees an opportunity to filch $200 from a lawyer's office. The file he steals actually contains $30,000 in blackmail money; lawyer Victor Backett (Edmon Ryan) and his partner George Garsell (James Craig) have already murdered the girl who helped them get it, Lucille Colner (Adele Jergens). Ellen has her baby and Joe decides to return the money. He walks into Backett's office and confesses all --- and then discovers that a bartender has stolen his boodle. Before Joe knows what has hit him, Garsell has killed the bartender and framed Joe for the crime. With the police on his tail, Joe's only hope is to find Garsell first. He contacts nightclub singer Harriette Sinton (Jean Hagen) for help, not realizing that she sees through him as well.

Side Street is always explained as a follow-up to the impressive They Live by Night. Like many noir gems, the Nicholas Ray film was a reported box office failure, so it must have been an aesthetic decision to re-team Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell in a story about young lovers in trouble. The couple isn't as compelling here, mainly because their characters have been conceived along MGM 'little people' lines. As in Mystery Street and even the revivalist parable The Next Voice You Hear, Joe and Ellen Norson are 'simple, good Americans' living a working-class life. Trouble comes when Joe is tempted to pilfer some money, an offense that snowballs to life-threatening proportions. Ellen panics too, screaming over a phone for Joe to run, when he should be turning himself over to the police. As in Quicksand, the message is that good lumpen proles need to keep their noses clean and forget about things like fur coats.

The kiddie-lesson moralizing and the plagiarism from The Naked City would cripple the show were it not for MGM's impressive production values. Anthony Mann's strong visual sense -- many tight, odd angles -- is active even without John Alton behind the camera, and he finds renewed dynamism in the New York locations. The final car chase through the canyons of Wall Street is strong stuff for 1950, with the cars taking tight corners at high speeds.

Joe Norson's consistently foolish behavior is more appropriate for a sixteen year-old. He's had a business and lived in NYC all his life yet is a babe in the woods in his interpersonal dealings. He parks a mystery package with a bartender and never thinks that the man might peek inside. He walks into an office that has $30,000 stashed in a file cabinet and expects to find honest men. Joe is too insipid to qualify as a good noir loser character, like Al Roberts in Detour. Instead of hoping he'll get free, we're just as likely to wish that Ellen had fallen in love with somebody sensible. An honest ending would add an epilogue showing Joe Norson back in a menial job, no longer dreaming for anything better.

The venal crooks murder Lucille and several other obstacles in a business-as-usual fashion. Edmon Ryan is excellent as the cagey lawyer and James Craig is suitably ruthless with the ladies. Adele Jergens is a crooked blonde beauty with rotten luck in friends, and up 'n' coming Jean Hagen steals the show with just one scene as an alcoholic torch singer. It's a crime to think that her great role in Singin' in the Rain didn't lead to even better things.

Side Street plays fine on DVD, with crisp B&W location photography that takes us back to the hot sidewalks of 1950 Manhattan. Lennie Hayton's underscore is a definite plus. A trailer is included as well as Richard Schickel's casual, sparse commentary track. Schickel considers the film a great noir and opens by saying that the shots of the tall buildings imply that the city oppresses little people like Joe and Ellen. His remarks about the backgrounds of the filmmakers and actors are informed and authoritative. Sparkhill's featurette Where Danger Lurks has input from Patricia King Hanson, Christopher Coppola, Richard Schickel and Oliver Stone.

The features have chapter stops but no chapter menus. After experimenting with slim cases, Warners is back to using full-sized keep cases for all of its boxed sets.

For more information about They Live By Night/Side Street, visit Warner Video. To order They Live By Night/Side Street, go to TCM Shopping.

by Glenn Erickson

They Live By Night/Side Street - A Film Noir Double Feature - Nicholas Ray's THEY LIVE BY NIGHT & Anthony Mann's SIDE STREET

Warners' Film Noir Classic Collection Vol 4 collects five thriller double bills probably classified in the 'Low "A"' to 'High "B"' range, encompassing titles from Warners, RKO and MGM with a Monogram oddity thrown in for good measure. This pairing links RKO's They Live By Night and MGM's Side Street, both starring Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell. Nicholas Ray's first feature They Live By Night is the work of a Hollywood outsider. It's definitely Noir by theme and characterization, but is sourced in Edward Anderson's socially conscious Depression-era novel Thieves Like Us. A product of Roosevelt's New Deal public works programs, Ray was brought to Los Angeles by producer John Houseman and encouraged to place artistic goals first. With two young stars borrowed from Goldwyn, Ray made what might be Hollywood's darkest romance since the silent era. Synopsis: Inexperienced Bowie Bowers (Farley Granger) escapes from jail with hardened criminals T-Dub and Chickamaw (Jay C. Flippen & Howard Da Silva) and is stashed at Mobley's filling station to recover from a wound. He's nursed by Mobley's teenaged daughter Keechie (Cathy O'Donnell). Despite the fact that neither has known anything but hardship and distrust, they begin a friendship. Bowie accompanies his cohorts on robberies and is soon being publicized as a bloodthirsty public enemy; Bowie and Keechie go on the run together and find that the underworld doesn't want loose-cannon hillbillies hanging around. They marry on the road, and Keechie becomes pregnant. When T-Dub and Chickamaw run into trouble, the young couple hide out at a motor hotel run by Mattie Mansfield (Helen Craig), who is bitter because her husband's parole has been denied. Bowie sneaks out to arrange their escape to Mexico. They Live By Night is the most tender of films noir. It opens with a dreamy shot of lovers kissing by firelight, while the words, "This boy ... and this girl ... were never properly introduced to the world we live in" fade up on the screen. Keechie and Bowie share a sensitivity that transcends their miserable backgrounds. He's been in prison since childhood and she's turned cold and hostile to avoid further abuse from her drunken father. When Bowie returns from a robbery with a gift, we can see Keechie's heart melt. From then on they're like mated animals. Keechie's father is quick to inform on the lovers. The bull-like T-Dub and the hotheaded Chickamaw use threats to force Bowie into more bank robberies. Ray concentrates on the couple's growing relationship. Keechie and Bowie gratefully accept whatever happiness they can find. Whenever they let down their guard and behave like 'real people', things go wrong. Bowie foolishly flashes his bankroll in front of strangers. A crooked marriage parlor operator (Ian Wolfe) can tell immediately that they're fugitives. The idea of 'honor among thieves' is revealed as a myth when crooks grossly overcharge them, and friends betray them to the police. Their situation is summed up by nightclub singer Marie Bryant's evocative delivery of Your Red Wagon, a creepy jazz tune that insists that one's problems are one's own, and it's no good expecting others to sympathize. Nicholas Ray's fine direction is just what Farley Granger needed -- he was never this good again, not even in his movies for Alfred Hitchcock. The much more natural performer Cathy O'Donnell is simply magnificent. They Live By Night conjures powerful and memorable images, from its innovative helicopter shots to cameraman George Diskant's unusual character compositions. The lovers' happy faces fill the screen as they dream of the future, until the one-eyed Chickamaw shows up to demonstrate his menace by crushing Christmas ornaments. Not every scene happens at night, but those that do evoke the false sense of security when driving in a car, and the loneliness of being set adrift in a hostile world. They Live By Night is the second of a string of very good rural bandit - amour fou movies roughly based on the Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow story. Fritz Lang's You Only Live Once is good cinema but forced in almost every respect. Joseph H. Lewis' Gun Crazy has a different blend of violence and out-of-control sexuality, and Robert Altman's Thieves Like Us has its good points as well. Arthur Penn's Bonnie & Clyde is a masterpiece in its own right but openly borrows from Nick Ray. The banker that leaps onto Clyde's running board and is shot in the face is clearly meant to one-up the They Live By Night moment when Bowie shoves the nice jeweler from his car window. A big part of our concern for Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty is the edgy knowledge that their demise will be bloody and graphic. At the end of They Live By Night, we wish we could throw ourselves in front of the police to shield the Romeo & Juliet-like Granger and O'Donnell. The conclusion is as complex as noir films get, a beautiful distillation of the trauma of criminal life. The hard-faced Mattie betrays Keechie and Bowie in a pitiful bid to free her own husband from prison. The finale is somewhat idealized, but the Madonna-like grace afforded Keechie is emotionally very moving. I've never seen a showing of They Live By Night where people didn't applaud -- even back in college screenings. The print of They Live By Night is nearly flawless, completely overshadowing the old Image laserdisc from the early 1990s. The nights are inky black and the image has very little grain. The interesting soundtrack highlights the music of Leigh Harline, and we're told that themes by Woody Guthrie can be heard as well. A fast-paced featurette by Sparkhill, The Twisted Road has on-camera contributions from Molly Haskell, James Ursini, Alain Silver, Oliver Stone, Christopher Coppola and star Farley Granger. Granger returns with Eddie Muller in a feature commentary. The gracious actor is good with generalities but remembers few specific details, and many of Muller's patient questions receive four-word non-answers. Muller gives a fine account of the making of the film. We might assume that the helicopter footage indicates a Howard Hughes influence -- Hughes injected aviation into films whenever he could -- but They Live By Night was produced before Hughes came to the studio. MGM made noir films but not a lot of great ones, perhaps because the studio's commitment to glamour worked against the noir ethos. Things changed a bit when Dore Schary imported Anthony Mann and John Alton from Eagle-Lion. The director and cameraman made an excellent team on Border Incident, but Alton may already have been working on An American in Paris by the time Side Street came around. Veteran Joseph Ruttenberg's camerawork is just as interesting. Side Street is a derivative tale sparked by some fancy location shooting, particularly an exciting car chase in the narrow streets of Lower Manhattan. An opening narration imitates Jules Dassin's The Naked City, describing the daily cycle in New York while criminals are doing their dirty work. As if conceived as an elongated version of a moralizing Crime Doesn't Pay short subject, our hero is an innocent dupe who makes one foolish decision and becomes the target of ruthless killers. Synopsis: Part-time mail carrier Joe Norson (Farley Granger) needs a real job to replace the filling station he lost; his young wife Ellen (Cathy O'Donnell) will have to give birth in the county hospital. Joe's dreaming of buying her a fur coat when he sees an opportunity to filch $200 from a lawyer's office. The file he steals actually contains $30,000 in blackmail money; lawyer Victor Backett (Edmon Ryan) and his partner George Garsell (James Craig) have already murdered the girl who helped them get it, Lucille Colner (Adele Jergens). Ellen has her baby and Joe decides to return the money. He walks into Backett's office and confesses all --- and then discovers that a bartender has stolen his boodle. Before Joe knows what has hit him, Garsell has killed the bartender and framed Joe for the crime. With the police on his tail, Joe's only hope is to find Garsell first. He contacts nightclub singer Harriette Sinton (Jean Hagen) for help, not realizing that she sees through him as well. Side Street is always explained as a follow-up to the impressive They Live by Night. Like many noir gems, the Nicholas Ray film was a reported box office failure, so it must have been an aesthetic decision to re-team Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell in a story about young lovers in trouble. The couple isn't as compelling here, mainly because their characters have been conceived along MGM 'little people' lines. As in Mystery Street and even the revivalist parable The Next Voice You Hear, Joe and Ellen Norson are 'simple, good Americans' living a working-class life. Trouble comes when Joe is tempted to pilfer some money, an offense that snowballs to life-threatening proportions. Ellen panics too, screaming over a phone for Joe to run, when he should be turning himself over to the police. As in Quicksand, the message is that good lumpen proles need to keep their noses clean and forget about things like fur coats. The kiddie-lesson moralizing and the plagiarism from The Naked City would cripple the show were it not for MGM's impressive production values. Anthony Mann's strong visual sense -- many tight, odd angles -- is active even without John Alton behind the camera, and he finds renewed dynamism in the New York locations. The final car chase through the canyons of Wall Street is strong stuff for 1950, with the cars taking tight corners at high speeds. Joe Norson's consistently foolish behavior is more appropriate for a sixteen year-old. He's had a business and lived in NYC all his life yet is a babe in the woods in his interpersonal dealings. He parks a mystery package with a bartender and never thinks that the man might peek inside. He walks into an office that has $30,000 stashed in a file cabinet and expects to find honest men. Joe is too insipid to qualify as a good noir loser character, like Al Roberts in Detour. Instead of hoping he'll get free, we're just as likely to wish that Ellen had fallen in love with somebody sensible. An honest ending would add an epilogue showing Joe Norson back in a menial job, no longer dreaming for anything better. The venal crooks murder Lucille and several other obstacles in a business-as-usual fashion. Edmon Ryan is excellent as the cagey lawyer and James Craig is suitably ruthless with the ladies. Adele Jergens is a crooked blonde beauty with rotten luck in friends, and up 'n' coming Jean Hagen steals the show with just one scene as an alcoholic torch singer. It's a crime to think that her great role in Singin' in the Rain didn't lead to even better things. Side Street plays fine on DVD, with crisp B&W location photography that takes us back to the hot sidewalks of 1950 Manhattan. Lennie Hayton's underscore is a definite plus. A trailer is included as well as Richard Schickel's casual, sparse commentary track. Schickel considers the film a great noir and opens by saying that the shots of the tall buildings imply that the city oppresses little people like Joe and Ellen. His remarks about the backgrounds of the filmmakers and actors are informed and authoritative. Sparkhill's featurette Where Danger Lurks has input from Patricia King Hanson, Christopher Coppola, Richard Schickel and Oliver Stone. The features have chapter stops but no chapter menus. After experimenting with slim cases, Warners is back to using full-sized keep cases for all of its boxed sets. For more information about They Live By Night/Side Street, visit Warner Video. To order They Live By Night/Side Street, go to TCM Shopping. by Glenn Erickson

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Actress Cathy O'Donnell was borrowed for the film from David O. Selznick and Farley Granger was borrowed from Samuel Goldwyn. Publicity materials note that much of the film was shot at various locations in New York City, including Central Park, Stuyvesant Town, Battery Park, the Bellvue Hospital morgue, the Polyclinic maternity ward, Wall Street, Bowling Green Park, the Fulton Fish Market, the Queensboro Bridge and a Greenwich Village nightclub. According to a New York Times article, filming of the scene in which a taxicab is being chased through the Wall Street area of New York City ran into some difficulties when the taxicab that was supposed to hit a curb and flip onto its side in front of the J. P. Morgan Building failed to do so after repeated attempts.