Shy People


1h 58m 1987

Brief Synopsis

A New York journalist fed up with city life and concerned for the welfare of her trendy daughter, takes off for the deep south in search of her great uncle.

Film Details

Also Known As
bayou
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
Cannon Releasing
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; New York City, New York, USA; Louisiana, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Synopsis

A New York journalist fed up with city life and concerned for the welfare of her trendy daughter, takes off for the deep south in search of her great uncle.

Crew

Calvin Acord

Special Effects Coordinator

Michael Adams

Stunt Coordinator

Saeed Adyani

Assistant

Paul Ahrens

Props

Michael Alden

Post-Production Supervisor

Willy Allen

Sound Editor

Rachel Ames

Production Accountant

Lesley Anne Anderson

Hair

Donald Arnold

Transportation Captain

James Babineaux

Electrician

Petra Bach

Sound Editor

Alice Baker

Set Decorator

Wenden K Baldwin

Titles

Gregg Barbanell

Foley

Barbara Barnaby

Sound Editor

Ron Bartlett

Foley Editor

Shelly Bates

Camera Assistant

Joe Benn

Production Assistant

Theresa Bentz

Costumes

Caroline Berard

Animal Trainer

Alan Bergman

Song

Marilyn Bergman

Song

Chantal Bernheim

Script Supervisor

Lark Bernini

Production Coordinator

John Bigham

Song Performer

Michael Bishop

Song

Michael Bishop

Song Performer

Monte Black

Assistant Camera Operator

Bernard Blanchard

Other

Arthur Bloom

Key Grip

Noah Blough

Sound Editor

Mark Boisseau

Sound Editor

Michael Bolner

Rigging Gaffer

Jim Boniece

Grip

Dina R Boreffi

Other

James A Borgardt

Adr Supervisor

Ron Boustead

Theme Lyrics

Gerard Brach

Screenplay

John S Broadus

Swing Gang

Paula Brody

Assistant Director

Diana Burton

Production Coordinator

Bruce Byall

Dolly Grip

Frank Capra

Assistant Director

Alan Caso

Camera Operator

Chris Chandler

Production Assistant

Patsy Chaney

Tailor

Patsy Chaney

Costumes

Judy Clayman

Casting

Janey Clewer

Song Performer

Chuck Colwell

Camera Operator

Andrew Cooper

Photography

Mike Daigle

Other

Kevin Daly

Song

Ronny Dana

Assistant Camera Operator

Christine Danelski

Sound Editor

William Darrow

Other

Marjorie David

Screenplay

Richard Dearborn

Swing Gang

Kelly Deco

Scenic Artist

Elizabeth Dimon

Props

Richard W Dooley

Location Coordinator

Katherine Dover

Costume Designer

Tangerine Dream

Music

Tangerine Dream

Song

Nora Dunfee

Dialogue Coach

Genele Edey

Other

Rina Eliashiv

Costumes

Virginia S Ellsworth

Music Editor

Paula Erickson

Music Supervisor

Ruth Etting

Song Performer

Maryanne Evans

Assistant Camera Operator

Frank Eyton

Song

Allen S. Facemire

Camera Operator

Bruce Fahr

Craft Service

James Fanning

Other

Beth Fein

Production Assistant

Amy Beth Feldman

Art Assistant

Ed Fine

Camera Assistant

Marc S. Fischer

Production Supervisor

Michael Fottrell

Unit Production Manager

Fred G Fournet

Assistant

Florin Furda

Assistant

Jessica Gallavan

Adr Editor

John Ganem

Music Editor

Albert Gasser

Sound Editor

Michael Gastaldo

On-Set Dresser

Sandy Gendler

Sound Editor

David Gent

Carpenter

Pat Gerhardt

Makeup

Dennis Glass

Makeup Assistant

Yoram Globus

Producer

Menahem Golan

Producer

Johnny Green

Song

Gregory Lyle Guidry

Art Assistant

Rosslyn S Guilbeau

Other

Emile Guirard

Swing Gang

Greg Guirard

Assistant

Greg Guirard

Technical Advisor

Cynthia Halac

Accounting Assistant

Marvin Hamlisch

Song

Diana Harbowecki

Production Assistant

Robin Harlan

Foley

Kevin Haynes

Transportation Co-Captain

Seymour Heller

Video

Bonnie Henderson

Other

Rick Herrington

Electrician

Rowdy Herrington

Gaffer

Edward Heyman

Song

Jeff Hirschorn

Assistant Camera Operator

Lawrence Hoff

Sound Mixer

Robin Holland

Photography

Beth Holmes

Costume Supervisor

Axel Hubert

Assistant Editor

Nick Infield

Assistant Camera Operator

Chris Jackson

Sound Editor

Alain Jakubowicz

Editor

Jimmy Jones

Transportation Coordinator

Mary Kane

Production Manager

David Katz

Video Playback

Robin Katz

Music Editor

Steve Kelso

Stunts

Andrei Konchalovsky

From Story

Andrei Konchalovsky

Screenplay

Mike Korko

Dolly Grip

Jim Lafferty

Carpenter

Connie Lancaster Smith

Production Coordinator

Lance Laurienzo

Sound Editor

Jimmy D Laviolette

Other

Stephanie Lee

Music Coordinator

Galit Lidsky

Assistant Editor

Brian Fox Livingston

Swing Gang

Brian Loft

Special Effects

Michael Lund

Assistant Camera Operator

Edwin Thomas Lyon

Generator Operator

Julio Macat

Camera Operator

Robert Macdonald

Casting

Tommy Magglos

Assistant Camera Operator

Mony Mansano

Makeup

Samuel Marquez

Special Effects

Steve Marsh

Production Designer

Pete Martinez

Video Playback

Susan Massih

Researcher

Nini Mazen

Post-Production Coordinator

Alex Mazur

Props

Alex Mazur

Assistant Set Dresser

Leslie Mcdonald

Art Director

Patrick Mcguire

Swing Gang

Chris Menges

Director Of Photography

Patrushkha Mierzwa

Boom Operator

Leslie Morales

Set Decorator

Timothy J Moran

Special Effects

Len Morganti

Visual Effects

Nancy Mott

Casting

Charlie Mullin

Sound Editor

John W Murphy

Grip

Michael Murphy

2nd Assistant Editor

Pat Orseth

Casting

David F Oyster

Photography

Mike Pappas

Grip

Ken Pawlak

Sound

Russell Dale Peirrottie

Craft Service

Per Peterson

Grip

Sean Phillips

Special Effects

Kevin L Poor

Sound Editor

Julie Pyken

Casting Associate

Jay Raymond

Art Department Coordinator

John Reed

Carpenter

Joel Renfro

Transportation Coordinator

Alex Renskoff

Assistant Editor

Steve Richardson

Foley

Layne Robinson

Carpenter

Joan Rowwe

Foley

Barry Rudolph

Song

Marcelo Sansevieri

Assistant Editor

Paul Santos

Electrician

Pietro Scalia

Assistant Editor

Mark Daniel Schiller

Video Assist/Playback

Michael Schroeder

Assistant Director

Kyle Seidenbaum

Titles

Toni Semple

Electrician

Roee Sharon

Production Assistant

Christopher Sheldon

Sound Editor

Neal Sheridan

Grip

Anthony Sherin

Assistant Editor

Danielle M Simpson

Swing Gang

Andy Singer

Production Assistant

Jeffrey S Smith

Dolly Grip

Michael L Smith

Grip

Steve Smith

Key Grip

Robert Sour

Song

Shelley Speck

Song

Chris Squires

Camera Operator

Larry Stensvold

Sound

Bobby A Tacker

Transportation Co-Captain

Cherie Tash

Stunts

Bill Thiederman

Sound

Tommy Trail

Other

Jerry Trent

Foley

Michael Trim

Electrician

Mark F. Ulano

Sound Mixer

Film Details

Also Known As
bayou
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
Cannon Releasing
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; New York City, New York, USA; Louisiana, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Articles

Edward Bunker (1933-2005)


Edward Bunker, the tough, charismatic ex-convict who eventaully turned his life around and became a respected writer, (No Beast So Fierce) and actor (Resevoir Dogs), died in Burbank on July 19 after complications developed from a surgical procedure to improve circulation in his legs. He was 71.

He was born on December 31, 1933 in Hollywood, California to a mother who was a chorus girl in a few Busby Berkely musicals, and a father who was a studio grip; two of the lesser positions in the Hollywood hierarchy. After his parents divorced when he was four, he spent the next several years in various foster homes and juvenile reform schools. By 14, he notched his first criminal conviction for burglery; at 17, he stabbed a youth prison guard; and by 19, he was considered so violent a felon, that he became the youngest inmate ever at San Quentin.

For the next 20 years, Bunker would be in and out of prison for numerous felonies: robbery, battery, and check forgery, just to name a few. While in prison, he read the novel of another San Quentin inmate, Caryl Chessman, whose book, Cell 2455, Death Row, was a reveleation to Bunker, so he set about devoting himself to writing.

He enrolled in a correspondence course in freshman English from the University of California, and after several years of unpublished novels, he struck gold in 1973 with No Beast So Fierce. The novel, about a paroled thief whose attempt to reenter mainstream society fails, was as tough and unforgiving as anything ever written about a parolee's readjustment to the outside, and it rightfully earned Bunker acclaim as a writer to watch.

After he was released from prison in 1975, Bunker concentrated on writing and acting. His big film break happened when No Beast So Fierce was turned into the movie Straight Time (1978) starring Dustin Hoffman. He co-wrote the screenplay, and also had a small part as one of Hoffman's cronies.

Bunker's next big hit as a screenwriter and actor was Runaway Train (1985), a pulsating drama about two escaped convicts (Jon Voight and Eric Roberts) where again, he had a small role as Jonah. It was obvious by now that Bunker, with his gruff voice, unnerving gaze, broken nose, and his signature feature - a scar from a knife wound that ran from his forehead to his lip - would make a most enigmatic movie villian.

A few more roles in prominent pictures followed: The Running Man, Shy People (both 1987), Tango & Cash (1989), before he scored the best role of his career, Mr. Blue in Quentin Tarantino's celebrated cult caper Reservoir Dogs (1992). It couldn't have been easy for Bunker to hold his own in a cast of heavyweights (Harvey Keitel, Lawrence Tierney, Tim Roth and Steve Buscemi), but he did - and with a muscularly lithe style that was all his own.

After Reservoir Dogs, Bunker was in demand as a villian. His next few films: Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), were routine, but he proved that he could deliver with professional, if familiar performances. Actor Steve Buscemi helped Bunker get his novel Animal Factory to the screen in 2000, with Bunker again adapting his own work for film. He was last seen as a convict, although with sharp comedic overtones, in the recent Adam Sandler farce The Longest Yard (2005). He is survived by his son, Brendan.

by Michael "Mitch" Toole
Edward Bunker (1933-2005)

Edward Bunker (1933-2005)

Edward Bunker, the tough, charismatic ex-convict who eventaully turned his life around and became a respected writer, (No Beast So Fierce) and actor (Resevoir Dogs), died in Burbank on July 19 after complications developed from a surgical procedure to improve circulation in his legs. He was 71. He was born on December 31, 1933 in Hollywood, California to a mother who was a chorus girl in a few Busby Berkely musicals, and a father who was a studio grip; two of the lesser positions in the Hollywood hierarchy. After his parents divorced when he was four, he spent the next several years in various foster homes and juvenile reform schools. By 14, he notched his first criminal conviction for burglery; at 17, he stabbed a youth prison guard; and by 19, he was considered so violent a felon, that he became the youngest inmate ever at San Quentin. For the next 20 years, Bunker would be in and out of prison for numerous felonies: robbery, battery, and check forgery, just to name a few. While in prison, he read the novel of another San Quentin inmate, Caryl Chessman, whose book, Cell 2455, Death Row, was a reveleation to Bunker, so he set about devoting himself to writing. He enrolled in a correspondence course in freshman English from the University of California, and after several years of unpublished novels, he struck gold in 1973 with No Beast So Fierce. The novel, about a paroled thief whose attempt to reenter mainstream society fails, was as tough and unforgiving as anything ever written about a parolee's readjustment to the outside, and it rightfully earned Bunker acclaim as a writer to watch. After he was released from prison in 1975, Bunker concentrated on writing and acting. His big film break happened when No Beast So Fierce was turned into the movie Straight Time (1978) starring Dustin Hoffman. He co-wrote the screenplay, and also had a small part as one of Hoffman's cronies. Bunker's next big hit as a screenwriter and actor was Runaway Train (1985), a pulsating drama about two escaped convicts (Jon Voight and Eric Roberts) where again, he had a small role as Jonah. It was obvious by now that Bunker, with his gruff voice, unnerving gaze, broken nose, and his signature feature - a scar from a knife wound that ran from his forehead to his lip - would make a most enigmatic movie villian. A few more roles in prominent pictures followed: The Running Man, Shy People (both 1987), Tango & Cash (1989), before he scored the best role of his career, Mr. Blue in Quentin Tarantino's celebrated cult caper Reservoir Dogs (1992). It couldn't have been easy for Bunker to hold his own in a cast of heavyweights (Harvey Keitel, Lawrence Tierney, Tim Roth and Steve Buscemi), but he did - and with a muscularly lithe style that was all his own. After Reservoir Dogs, Bunker was in demand as a villian. His next few films: Distant Cousins (1993), Somebody to Love (1994), were routine, but he proved that he could deliver with professional, if familiar performances. Actor Steve Buscemi helped Bunker get his novel Animal Factory to the screen in 2000, with Bunker again adapting his own work for film. He was last seen as a convict, although with sharp comedic overtones, in the recent Adam Sandler farce The Longest Yard (2005). He is survived by his son, Brendan. by Michael "Mitch" Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the Best Actress Award (Barbara Hershey) at the 1987 Cannes Film Festival.

Released in United States December 4, 1987

Released in United States Spring March 11, 1988

Released in United States on Video September 8, 1988

Released in United States 1988

Shown at Munich Film Festival June 25-July 3, 1988.

Began shooting September 22, 1986.

Released in United States December 4, 1987 (for Academy consideration; Los Angeles)

Released in United States Spring March 11, 1988

Released in United States on Video September 8, 1988

Released in United States 1988 (Shown at Munich Film Festival June 25-July 3, 1988.)