Shooting High


1h 5m 1940

Brief Synopsis

Jane Pritchard (Jane Withers) sides with the Carsons in a generations-old feud which her family wages with the descendents of Wild Bill Carson, first United States Marshal of Carson Corners. Will Carson (Gene Autry) insists that a Pritchard killed his grandfather when the Marshal came into town on a marauding expedition led by The Hawk. Will maintains his grandfather had joined the gang to trap the leaders and a trigger-happy Pritchard had kept him from doing so. A crew from Signet Pictures comes to town to film the story of Wild Bill's life. Will is in love with Jane's sister, Marjorie (Marjorie Weaver)but her banker-father opposes the match. Will and Marjorie argue, and she becomes infatuated with Bob Merritt (Robert Lowery), who is to co-star in the film with Evelyn Trent (Kay Aldridge, billed as usual at TCF as Katharine Aldridge.) Jane and Sheriff Clem Perkle (Hobart Cavanaugh) get rid of Merritt by telling him the townspeople are going to ride him out of town on a rail. Movie director J. Wallace Rutledge (Hamilton McFadden)agrees to let Will play the role of his grandfather. On the day a bank robbery scene is to be filmed at Pritchard's bank, four supposed actors who have joined the troupe turn out to be bank robbers for real. The townspeople, seeing Will chasing after the robbers, assume he was part of the gang and has reverted to what they consider the character trait of the Carson family.

Film Details

Also Known As
Jubilo
Release Date
Apr 26, 1940
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 12 Apr 1940
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Santa Susana Pass, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,842ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

The long standing feud between the Carsons and the Pritchards threatens the romance of Will Carson and Marjorie Pritchard. Calvin Pritchard, Marjorie's father as well as the bank president and mayor of Carson Corners, pretends to sanction Will's courtship of his daughter because he needs some Carson property for a proposed highway. When Will learns Calvin's motives, he accuses Marjorie of plotting with her father to steal Carson land. Gene's accusation causes the long simmering dispute to erupt, and as the clans begin their bickering, Gabby Cross, a publicity agent for Spectrum Pictures, appears and offers the town $20,000 to serve as a location for a picture he is making about Wild Bill Carson, Will's grandfather and the founder of Carson Corners. An angry Calvin refuses Gabby's offer, but Jane, his younger daughter, suggests a compromise: the highway for the picture. The bargain struck, the movie company comes to town and star Bob Merritt begins to court Marjorie. Jane, who wants her sister to marry Will, schemes with the sheriff to frighten Merritt out of town by telling him that a lynch party is after his neck. When the head of Spectrum Pictures threatens to sue Pritchard for Merritt's defection, Gabby suggests giving the part to Will, who agrees on the condition that Pritchard extend the Carson mortgages. In the midst of filming, three gangsters drive into town, and when the company stages a bank hold-up, the three slip into the actors' costumes and rob the bank for real. Pursuing them on horseback, Will brings the thieves and the money back to town, thus winning the Pritchards' respect and Marjorie's hand.

Film Details

Also Known As
Jubilo
Release Date
Apr 26, 1940
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 12 Apr 1940
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Santa Susana Pass, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,842ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this picture was Jubilo. According to an early studio press release, this picture was to have featured Tony Martin and Joan Davis. The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library add that second unit director Otto Brower filmed the Southern Pacific Train crew at Santa Susana Pass, CA. This was Gene Autry's first non-Republic western and the first time that he wasn't named "Gene" in a picture. According to another studio press release, a controversy occurred over whether Gene should kiss Marjorie Weaver at the film's conclusion, and when his fans objected, the scene was dropped.