See No Evil, Hear No Evil


1h 43m 1989

Brief Synopsis

A man is murdered outside a newsstand owned by a blind man and a deaf man who are the only witnesses.

Film Details

Also Known As
Hör upp, blindstyre!, Non Guardarmi: Non Ti Sento, Pas Nous, See No Evil, Hear No Evil
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Lyndhurst, New Jersey, USA; Ridgefield, New Jersey, USA; Little Ferry, New Jersey, USA; Vernon, New Jersey, USA; New York City, New York, USA; Connecticut, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Synopsis

A man is murdered outside a newsstand owned by a blind man and a deaf man who are the only witnesses.

Crew

G. A. Aguilar

Stunts

Danny Aiello Iii

Stunts

Bill Anagnos

Stunts

J H Arrufat

Sound Editor

Earl Barret

From Story

Earl Barret

Executive Producer

Earl Barret

Story By

Earl Barret

Screenplay

Ken Bates

Stunts

Gary Baxley

Stunts

Dana Bertolette

Stunts

James T Best

Assistant

Mary Bialey

Script Supervisor

Julie A. Bloom

Assistant Director

Gary Blufer

Sound Effects

Raul Bonilla

Assistant

Michael Boonstra

Production Assistant

Bob Bradshaw

Sound Editor

Conrad F Brink

Special Effects

Bob Brown

Assistant Camera Operator

Jack Brown

Assistant Camera Operator

Paul Bucossi

Stunts

Pete Bucossi

Stunts

Mark Burchard

Costume Supervisor

Joseph M Caracciolo

Assistant Director

Arlene B Coffey

Costume Supervisor

Marius Constant

Song

Stewart Copeland

Music

Annie M Demille

Hair

George Detitta Jr.

Set Decorator

Michael Dittrick

Music Editor

James E Dolan

Gaffer

James P. Dolan

Electrician

Norman Douglass

Stunts

Gordon Ecker

Sound Editor

Gregg Elam

Stunts

John Michael Fanaris

Sound Effects

Roy Farfel

Stunts

Sylvia Fay

Casting

Glory Fioramonti

Stunts

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

John R Ford

Property Master Assistant

Debra Mendel Freedman

Assistant

Viola Frey

Art Department

Dean Garvin

Production Assistant

Steven Gerrior

Adr

K. Scott Gertsen

Construction Coordinator

Tom Gilligan

Best Boy

Michael Ginsburg

Photography

Louis Goldman

Photography

Robert Griffon

Property Master

Al Griswold

Special Effects

Marguerite Guardino

Assistant

Robert Gundlach

Production Designer

Wendi Haas

Production Coordinator

Michael Haley

Assistant Director

Dick Hancock

Stunts

Barbara Harris

Casting

Burtt Harris

Executive Producer

Burtt Harris

Unit Production Manager

Liza J Harris

Production Assistant

Megan Harris

Production Assistant

Kristie Hart

Production Assistant

John J Healey

Assistant

Jery Hewitt

Stunts

Erica Hiller

Associate Producer

Mike Hoskinson

Sound Editor

James J Isaacs

Sound Editor

Jennie Johnson

Assistant

Leslie Jones

Assistant Editor

Robert C. Jones

Editor

Rashon Kahn

Assistant

Ed Kelly

Assistant

Victor J Kemper

Other

Victor J Kemper

Director Of Photography

John D Kennedy

Dolly Grip

Patti L Kleinman

Assistant

Andrew Kurtzman

Screenplay

John Leveque

Sound Editor

Tony Lloyd

Makeup

Wilson Lyle

Craft Service

Dennis Maitland

Sound Mixer

Mark Mcgann

Assistant Director

David Mcmurray

Song

Roberta Mineo

Assistant

Ruth Morley

Costume Designer

Edward Mourino

Stunts

Richard P Murray

Production Assistant

Phil Neilson

Stunts

Edward O'donnell

Transportation Captain

Paul Staveley O'duffy

Song

Greg Orloff

Foley Mixer

Conrad Palmisano

Stunt Coordinator

Lillian Pan

Assistant

Gary M Parker

Boom Operator

Steve Pederson

Sound

Bernadette Penotti

Production Assistant

Robert Perrone

Assistant

W Wister Pilling

Craft Service

Paul Porelli

Assistant

Richard Portman

Sound

Tom Priestley

Director Of Photography

Tom Priestley

Other

Ed Quinn

Key Grip

Thomas Reilly

Transportation Coordinator

Phd Ronald S Reiter

Assistant

Sandy Richman

Stunts

Ruben R Rodriguez

Accounting Assistant

John Roesch

Foley Artist

Todd Rosken

Assistant

Mike Russo

Stunts

Joseph Sabella

Foley Artist

Rick Seaman

Stunts

Jeff Seitz

Music

James T Singelis

Art Director

Ellen J Smith

Production Assistant

Mark Smith

Sound

Lynn Stalmaster

Casting

Bruce Stambler

Sound Editor

Annie Stewart

Location Coordinator

Michael L Stone

Camera Operator

Becky Sullivan

Adr Editor

Arne Sultan

Screenplay

Arne Sultan

Story By

Arne Sultan

Executive Producer

Arne Sultan

From Story

Shawn Sykora

Foley Editor

Gary Tacon

Stunts

Carolyn Tapp

Foley

Roy Thomas

Stunts

William Traynor

Special Effects

Glen Trotiner

Assistant Director

Lori M Van Der Veer

Stunts

Toy Van Lierop

Makeup

Suzanne Vaucher

Accounting Assistant

Eliot Wald

Screenplay

Robert P Walzer

Assistant Editor

Don Warner

Sound Editor

David Was

Song

Don Was

Song

Deborah Watkins

Stunts

Karen Webb

Assistant

James Welch

Stunts

Monty Westmore

Makeup

Brenda White

Assistant

Gene Wilder

Screenplay

Tim Williams

Production Assistant

Jody Worth

Associate Producer

Marvin Worth

Story By

Marvin Worth

Producer

Marvin Worth

From Story

Harry Wowchuk

Stunts

Tom Wright

Stunts

Elizabeth Yanoska

Production Accountant

Richard E Yawn

Sound Editor

Aaron Zigman

Song

Film Details

Also Known As
Hör upp, blindstyre!, Non Guardarmi: Non Ti Sento, Pas Nous, See No Evil, Hear No Evil
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Lyndhurst, New Jersey, USA; Ridgefield, New Jersey, USA; Little Ferry, New Jersey, USA; Vernon, New Jersey, USA; New York City, New York, USA; Connecticut, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Articles

Richard Pryor (1940-2005)


The scathing, brilliantly insightful African-American comic who proved himself on many occasions to be a highly competent screen actor, died of a heart attack on November 10 at his Encino, California home. He was 65. He had been reclusive for years after he publicly announced he was suffering from multiple sclerosis in 1992.

He was born Richard Thomas Pryor III on December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois. By all accounts, his childhood was a difficult one. His mother was a prostitute and his grandmother ran a brothel. His father was rarely around and when he was, he would physically abuse him. From a young age, Pryor knew that humor was his weapon of choice to cut through all the swath he came across and would confront in his life.

After high school, he enlisted in the Army for a two-year stint (1958-60). When he was discharged (honorably!) he concentrated on stand-up comedy and worked in a series of nightclubs before relocating to New York City in 1963. In 1964, he made his television debut when he was given a slot on the variety program On Broadway Tonight. His routine, though hardly the groundbreaking material we would witness in later years, was very well received, and in the late '60s Pryor found more television work: Toast of the Town, The Wild Wild West, The Mod Squad ; and was cast in a two movies: The Busy Body (1967) with Sid Caesar; and Wild in the Streets (1968) a cartoonish political fantasy about the internment of all American citizens over 30.

Pryor's career really didn't ignite until the '70s. His stand up act became raunchier and more politically motivated as he touched on issued of race, failed relationships, drug addiction, and street crimes. His movie roles became far more captivating in the process: the piano man in Lady Sings the Blues (1972); as a wise-talking hustler in a pair of slick urban thrillers: The Mack (1973) and Uptown Saturday Night (1974); the gregarious Daddy Rich in Car Wash; his first pairing with Gene Wilder as Grover, the car thief who helps stops a runaway train in his first real box office smash Silver Streak (both 1976); and for many critics, his finest dramatic performance as a factory worker on the edge of depression in Paul Schrader's excellent working class drama Blue Collar (1978).

On a personal level, his drug dependency problem worsened, and on June 9, 1980, near tragedy struck when he caught fire while free-basing cocaine. Pryor later admitted that the incident, was, in fact, a suicide attempt, and that his management company created the lie for the press in hopes of protecting him. Fortunately, Pryor had three films in the can that all achieved some level of financial success soon after his setback: another pairing with Gene Wilder in the prison comedy Stir Crazy (1980); a blisteringly funny cameo as God who flips off Andy Kaufman in the warped religious satire In God We Tru$t (1980); an a ex-con helping a social worker (Cicely Tyson) with her foster charges in Bustin' Loose (1981). He capped his recovery with Live on the Sunset Strip (1982), a first-rate documentation of the comic's genius performed in front of a raucous live audience.

In 1983, Pryor signed a $40 million, five-year contract with Columbia Pictures. For many fans and critics, this was the beginning of his downslide. His next few films: The Toy, Superman III (both 1983), and Brewster's Millions (1985) were just tiresome, mediocre comedies. Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life is Calling (1986), was his only attempt at producing, directing, and acting, and the film, which was an ambitious autobiographical account of a his life and career, was a box-office disappointment. He spent the remainder of the '80s in middling fare: Condition Critical (1987), Moving; a third pairing with Gene Wilder in See No Evil, Hear No Evil; and his only teaming with Eddie Murphy in Harlem Nights (1989).

In 1986, Pryor was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a degenerative disease of the nervous system that curtailed both his personal appearances and his gift for physical comedy in his latter films. By the '90s, little was seen of Pryor, but in 1995, he made a courageous comeback on television when he guest starred on Chicago Hope as an embittered multiple sclerosis patient. His performance earned him an Emmy nomination and he was cast in a few more films: Mad Dog Time (1996), Lost Highway (1997), but his physical ailments prohibited him from performing on a regular basis. In 1998, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington gave Pryor the first Mark Twain Prize for humor. It was fitting tribute for a man who had given so much honesty and innovation in the field of comedy. Pryor is survived by his wife, Jennifer Lee; his sons Richard and Steven; and daughters Elizabeth, Rain and Renee.

by Michael T. Toole
Richard Pryor (1940-2005)

Richard Pryor (1940-2005)

The scathing, brilliantly insightful African-American comic who proved himself on many occasions to be a highly competent screen actor, died of a heart attack on November 10 at his Encino, California home. He was 65. He had been reclusive for years after he publicly announced he was suffering from multiple sclerosis in 1992. He was born Richard Thomas Pryor III on December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois. By all accounts, his childhood was a difficult one. His mother was a prostitute and his grandmother ran a brothel. His father was rarely around and when he was, he would physically abuse him. From a young age, Pryor knew that humor was his weapon of choice to cut through all the swath he came across and would confront in his life. After high school, he enlisted in the Army for a two-year stint (1958-60). When he was discharged (honorably!) he concentrated on stand-up comedy and worked in a series of nightclubs before relocating to New York City in 1963. In 1964, he made his television debut when he was given a slot on the variety program On Broadway Tonight. His routine, though hardly the groundbreaking material we would witness in later years, was very well received, and in the late '60s Pryor found more television work: Toast of the Town, The Wild Wild West, The Mod Squad ; and was cast in a two movies: The Busy Body (1967) with Sid Caesar; and Wild in the Streets (1968) a cartoonish political fantasy about the internment of all American citizens over 30. Pryor's career really didn't ignite until the '70s. His stand up act became raunchier and more politically motivated as he touched on issued of race, failed relationships, drug addiction, and street crimes. His movie roles became far more captivating in the process: the piano man in Lady Sings the Blues (1972); as a wise-talking hustler in a pair of slick urban thrillers: The Mack (1973) and Uptown Saturday Night (1974); the gregarious Daddy Rich in Car Wash; his first pairing with Gene Wilder as Grover, the car thief who helps stops a runaway train in his first real box office smash Silver Streak (both 1976); and for many critics, his finest dramatic performance as a factory worker on the edge of depression in Paul Schrader's excellent working class drama Blue Collar (1978). On a personal level, his drug dependency problem worsened, and on June 9, 1980, near tragedy struck when he caught fire while free-basing cocaine. Pryor later admitted that the incident, was, in fact, a suicide attempt, and that his management company created the lie for the press in hopes of protecting him. Fortunately, Pryor had three films in the can that all achieved some level of financial success soon after his setback: another pairing with Gene Wilder in the prison comedy Stir Crazy (1980); a blisteringly funny cameo as God who flips off Andy Kaufman in the warped religious satire In God We Tru$t (1980); an a ex-con helping a social worker (Cicely Tyson) with her foster charges in Bustin' Loose (1981). He capped his recovery with Live on the Sunset Strip (1982), a first-rate documentation of the comic's genius performed in front of a raucous live audience. In 1983, Pryor signed a $40 million, five-year contract with Columbia Pictures. For many fans and critics, this was the beginning of his downslide. His next few films: The Toy, Superman III (both 1983), and Brewster's Millions (1985) were just tiresome, mediocre comedies. Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life is Calling (1986), was his only attempt at producing, directing, and acting, and the film, which was an ambitious autobiographical account of a his life and career, was a box-office disappointment. He spent the remainder of the '80s in middling fare: Condition Critical (1987), Moving; a third pairing with Gene Wilder in See No Evil, Hear No Evil; and his only teaming with Eddie Murphy in Harlem Nights (1989). In 1986, Pryor was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a degenerative disease of the nervous system that curtailed both his personal appearances and his gift for physical comedy in his latter films. By the '90s, little was seen of Pryor, but in 1995, he made a courageous comeback on television when he guest starred on Chicago Hope as an embittered multiple sclerosis patient. His performance earned him an Emmy nomination and he was cast in a few more films: Mad Dog Time (1996), Lost Highway (1997), but his physical ailments prohibited him from performing on a regular basis. In 1998, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington gave Pryor the first Mark Twain Prize for humor. It was fitting tribute for a man who had given so much honesty and innovation in the field of comedy. Pryor is survived by his wife, Jennifer Lee; his sons Richard and Steven; and daughters Elizabeth, Rain and Renee. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring May 12, 1989

Released in United States on Video December 7, 1989

Re-released in United States on Video June 2, 1993

Released in United States August 1989

Shown at Norwegian Film Festival in Haugesund (market) August 19-25, 1989.

Originally released by RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video (video-USA)

Began shooting Fall 1988.

Released in United States Spring May 12, 1989

Released in United States on Video December 7, 1989

Re-released in United States on Video June 2, 1993

Released in United States August 1989 (Shown at Norwegian Film Festival in Haugesund (market) August 19-25, 1989.)