Secret Friends


1h 37m 1991

Brief Synopsis

An amnesiac is haunted by the recurring images of his murderous past and repressed childhood.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Channel 4; Channel Four Television; Cinesite Europe, Ltd.; Clein & White Public Relations; Filmfour International; Filmfour International; Set Meals; WB De Lane Lea
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Kent, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

An amnesiac is haunted by the recurring images of his murderous past and repressed childhood.

Crew

Brian Aldridge

Dressing Props

Mark Allaway

Clarinet Player

Dave Allen

Construction Manager

Rob Anderson

Carpenter

Alison Barnett

Associate Producer

Alison Barnett

Production Manager

Adam Biddle

Other

Michael Brent

Production Accountant

Edward Brett

1st Assistant Director

Mercedes Burleigh

Stand-In (For Gina Bellman)

Bill Burns

Stand-In (For Alan Bates)

Barry Cameron

Bestboy

David Chilton

Music Producer

Bill Clare

Construction Standby Driver

Paul Clarris

Drums

Toby Daffarn

Camera Department Trainee

Jerry Daly

2nd Assistant Director

Tom Daly

Wardrobe Driver

Chris Day

Electrician

Clare Douglas

Editor

Barry Dupille

Property Master

Wendy Edgar-jones

2nd Assistant Editor

Trisha Edwards

Props Buyer

Ian Foster

Camera Operator

Dennis Fruin

Standby Props

Mark Fruin

Standby Props

George Fullegar

Gaffer

Robert Michael Geisler

Executive Producer

Sue Gibson

Director Of Photography

Andy Glen

Sound Editor

Mark Gravil

1st Assistant Editor

Ivan Griffifths

Production Runner

Dennis Harrison

Other

Greg Heath

Saxophone Player

Lynn Horrie

Wardrobe Mistress

Sarah Horton

Art Director

Bob Hunt

Electrician

Vivien Jordan

Production Coordinator

Sara Keene

Publicist (United Kingdom)

Andy Kelk

3rd Assistant Director

David Kennaway

Location Manager

Carol Kupisz

Other

Barry Leonti

Minibus Driver

Sharon Lewis

Costume Designer

Kathleen Mackie

Casting

Jo Martin

Violin Player

Laurie Mcdowell

Assistant Sound Editor

Ann Mcewan

Makeup Artist

John Midgley

Sound Mixer

Shaun Mills

Sound Maintenance

Mark Moriarty

Other

Stephen Morley

Stills Photographer

Ron Nanson

Unit Driver

Ron Narduzzo

Unit Driver

Paula Oehlers

Other

Clive Osborne

Boom Operator

Keith Pitt

Dressing Props

Dennis Potter

Screenwriter

Dennis Potter

Source Material (From Novel)

Jane Potter

Other

Luke Quigley

Grip

John Roberdeau

Executive Producer

Neil Robertson

Camera Car Driver

John Roche

Makeup Driver

Nicholas Russell-pavier

Music

Valerie Russell-pavier

Script Supervisor

Guy Rutter

Other

Colin Ryan

Banjo Player; Guitar Player

Kimaathi Spence

Other

Charles D Staffel

Technical Coordinator

Deryn Stafford

Producer'S Assistant

Hugh Strain

Dubbing Mixer

Chris Streeter

Unit Driver

Gabrielle Sudock

Assistant (To Geisler-Roberdeau)

David Swift

Bass Player

John Sylvan

Props Runaround Driver

Terry Tapping

Unit Driver

Gary Tyndall

Props Standby Driver

Michael Webb

Transportation Manager

Brian West

Dressing Props

Rosemarie Whitman

Producer

Gary Williamson

Production Designer

John Wills

Dining Bus Driver

Petrona Winton

Makeup Assistant

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Channel 4; Channel Four Television; Cinesite Europe, Ltd.; Clein & White Public Relations; Filmfour International; Filmfour International; Set Meals; WB De Lane Lea
Location
London, England, United Kingdom; Kent, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)


Sir Alan Bates, the versatile British actor, who held a distinguished career on both stage and screen, via a string of outstanding roles in both classical (Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen) and contemporary (Pinter, Osborne, Stoppard) drama, died of pancreatic cancer on December 27th in London. He was 69.

Born Alan Arthur Bates on February 17th, 1934 in Derbyshire, England, Bates was the son of amateur musicians who wanted their son to become a concert pianist, but the young man had other ambitions, bluntly declaring to his parents that he had his sights set on an acting career when he was still in secondary school. He eventually earned a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, but had his career briefly interrupted with a two-year stint in the Royal Air Force. Soon after his discharge, Bates immediately joined the new English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre and by 1955 he had found steady stage work in London's West End theatre district.

The following year, Bates made a notable mark in English theatre circles when he starred as Cliff Lewis in John Osborne's charging drama about a disaffected, working-class British youth in Look Back in Anger. Bates' enormous stage presence along with his brooding good looks and youthfulness (he was only 22 at the time of the play's run) made him a star and promised great things for his future.

Four years later, Bates made a solid film debut in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960) as the son of a failing seaside entertainer, played by Sir Laurence Olivier. Yet it would be his next two films that would leave an indelible impression in '60s British cinema; Bryan Forbes' Whistle Down the Wind (1961) and John Schlesinger's A Kind of Loving (1962). Bates' performances as a murderer on the lam who finds solace at a farm house in the company of children in the former, and a young working-class husband who struggles with his identity in a loveless marriage in the latter, were such finely nuanced portrayals of loners coping with an oppressive social order that he struck a chord with both audiences and critics alike. Soon, Bates was considered a key actor in the "angry young men" movement of the decade that included Albert Finney and Tom Courtney.

For the next ten years, Bates simply moved from strength to strength as he chose film roles that both highlighted his range and raised his stock as an international celebrity: reprising his stage role as the brutish thug Mick in the film adaptation of Harold Pinter's The Caretaker (1963); starring alongside Anthony Quinn as the impressionable young writer Basil in Zorba the Greek (1964); the raffish charmer Jos who falls in love with Lynn Redgrave in the mod comedy Georgy Girl; the bemused young soldier who falls in love with a young mental patient (a radiantly young Genevieve Bujold) in the subdued anti-was satire King of Hearts (both 1966); reuniting with director Schlesinger again in the effective period drama Far from the Madding Crowd (1967); a Russian Jew falsely accused of murder in John Frankenheimer's The Fixer (1968, remarkably, his only Oscar nomination); as Rupert, the freethinking fellow who craves love and understanding in Ken Russell's superb Women in Love (1969); playing Vershinin in Sir Laurence Olivier's underrated The Three Sisters (1970); opposite Julie Christie in Joseph Losey's tale of forbidden love The Go-Between (1971); and his moving, near-tragic performance as Bri, a father who struggles daily to maintain his sanity while raising a mentally disabled daughter in the snarking black comedy A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972).

Bates would slow down his film work, concentrating on the stage for the next few years, including a Tony award winning turn on Broadway for his role in Butley (1972), but he reemerged strongly in the late '70s in three good films: a conniving womanizer in The Shout; Jill Clayburgh's love interest in Paul Mazursky's hit An Unmarried Woman (1978); and as Rudge, Bette Midler's overbearing manager in The Rose (1979).

By the '80s, Bates filled out somewhat physically, but his now burly presence looked just right in some quality roles: as the notorious spy, Guy Burgess, in John Schlesinger's acclaimed mini-series An Englishman Abroad (1983); a lonely homosexual who cares for his incarcerated lovers' dog in the charming comedy We think the World of You (1988); and a superb Claudius in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990).

Tragically, Bates lost his son Tristan to an asthma attack in 1990; and lost his wife, actress Victoria Ward, in 1992. This led to too few film roles for the next several years, although he remained quite active on stage and television. However, just recently, Bates has had some choice moments on the silver screen, most notably as the butler Mr. Jennings in Robert Altman's murder mystery Gosford Park (2001); and scored a great comic coup as a gun-toting, flag-waving Hollywood has-been in a very broad satire about the Canadian movie industry Hollywood North (2003). Also, theatre fans had a treat when Bates appeared on Broadway last year to critical acclaim (and won a second Tony award) for his portrayal of an impoverished 19th century Russian nobleman in Fortune's Fool (2002). Most deservedly, he was knighted earlier this year for his fine contributions as an actor in all major mediums. Sir Alan Bates is survived by two brothers Martin and Jon, son Benedick and a granddaughter.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)

Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)

Sir Alan Bates, the versatile British actor, who held a distinguished career on both stage and screen, via a string of outstanding roles in both classical (Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen) and contemporary (Pinter, Osborne, Stoppard) drama, died of pancreatic cancer on December 27th in London. He was 69. Born Alan Arthur Bates on February 17th, 1934 in Derbyshire, England, Bates was the son of amateur musicians who wanted their son to become a concert pianist, but the young man had other ambitions, bluntly declaring to his parents that he had his sights set on an acting career when he was still in secondary school. He eventually earned a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, but had his career briefly interrupted with a two-year stint in the Royal Air Force. Soon after his discharge, Bates immediately joined the new English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre and by 1955 he had found steady stage work in London's West End theatre district. The following year, Bates made a notable mark in English theatre circles when he starred as Cliff Lewis in John Osborne's charging drama about a disaffected, working-class British youth in Look Back in Anger. Bates' enormous stage presence along with his brooding good looks and youthfulness (he was only 22 at the time of the play's run) made him a star and promised great things for his future. Four years later, Bates made a solid film debut in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960) as the son of a failing seaside entertainer, played by Sir Laurence Olivier. Yet it would be his next two films that would leave an indelible impression in '60s British cinema; Bryan Forbes' Whistle Down the Wind (1961) and John Schlesinger's A Kind of Loving (1962). Bates' performances as a murderer on the lam who finds solace at a farm house in the company of children in the former, and a young working-class husband who struggles with his identity in a loveless marriage in the latter, were such finely nuanced portrayals of loners coping with an oppressive social order that he struck a chord with both audiences and critics alike. Soon, Bates was considered a key actor in the "angry young men" movement of the decade that included Albert Finney and Tom Courtney. For the next ten years, Bates simply moved from strength to strength as he chose film roles that both highlighted his range and raised his stock as an international celebrity: reprising his stage role as the brutish thug Mick in the film adaptation of Harold Pinter's The Caretaker (1963); starring alongside Anthony Quinn as the impressionable young writer Basil in Zorba the Greek (1964); the raffish charmer Jos who falls in love with Lynn Redgrave in the mod comedy Georgy Girl; the bemused young soldier who falls in love with a young mental patient (a radiantly young Genevieve Bujold) in the subdued anti-was satire King of Hearts (both 1966); reuniting with director Schlesinger again in the effective period drama Far from the Madding Crowd (1967); a Russian Jew falsely accused of murder in John Frankenheimer's The Fixer (1968, remarkably, his only Oscar nomination); as Rupert, the freethinking fellow who craves love and understanding in Ken Russell's superb Women in Love (1969); playing Vershinin in Sir Laurence Olivier's underrated The Three Sisters (1970); opposite Julie Christie in Joseph Losey's tale of forbidden love The Go-Between (1971); and his moving, near-tragic performance as Bri, a father who struggles daily to maintain his sanity while raising a mentally disabled daughter in the snarking black comedy A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972). Bates would slow down his film work, concentrating on the stage for the next few years, including a Tony award winning turn on Broadway for his role in Butley (1972), but he reemerged strongly in the late '70s in three good films: a conniving womanizer in The Shout; Jill Clayburgh's love interest in Paul Mazursky's hit An Unmarried Woman (1978); and as Rudge, Bette Midler's overbearing manager in The Rose (1979). By the '80s, Bates filled out somewhat physically, but his now burly presence looked just right in some quality roles: as the notorious spy, Guy Burgess, in John Schlesinger's acclaimed mini-series An Englishman Abroad (1983); a lonely homosexual who cares for his incarcerated lovers' dog in the charming comedy We think the World of You (1988); and a superb Claudius in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990). Tragically, Bates lost his son Tristan to an asthma attack in 1990; and lost his wife, actress Victoria Ward, in 1992. This led to too few film roles for the next several years, although he remained quite active on stage and television. However, just recently, Bates has had some choice moments on the silver screen, most notably as the butler Mr. Jennings in Robert Altman's murder mystery Gosford Park (2001); and scored a great comic coup as a gun-toting, flag-waving Hollywood has-been in a very broad satire about the Canadian movie industry Hollywood North (2003). Also, theatre fans had a treat when Bates appeared on Broadway last year to critical acclaim (and won a second Tony award) for his portrayal of an impoverished 19th century Russian nobleman in Fortune's Fool (2002). Most deservedly, he was knighted earlier this year for his fine contributions as an actor in all major mediums. Sir Alan Bates is survived by two brothers Martin and Jon, son Benedick and a granddaughter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 14, 1992

Shown at London Film Festival November 6-21, 1991.

Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival January 8-15, 1992.

Began shooting April 15, 1991.

Completed shooting May 25, 1991.

Whistling Gypsy Productions is Dennis Potter's company.

Released in United States January 1992 (Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival January 8-15, 1992.)

Released in United States January 23, 1998 (Leammle's Grand 4 Plex; Los Angeles)

Released in United States Winter February 14, 1992

Released in United States January 1992

Released in United States January 23, 1998

Released in United States November 1991

Released in United States November 1991 (Shown at London Film Festival November 6-21, 1991.)