The Sea Wolves


2h 1980
The Sea Wolves

Brief Synopsis

British intelligence is trying to solve the problem of German submarines attacking British merchant ships during World War II. Thousands of tons of goods are being lost, and it is believed that information is getting to the subs via a radio transmitter in one of three German ships in Portuguese Goa. Because Portugal is neutral in the war, the British forces cannot attack the ships, so a group of older British expatriates are called upon to do it for them.

Film Details

Also Known As
Sea Wolves
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adventure
Drama
Thriller
War
Release Date
1980

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Synopsis

British intelligence is trying to solve the problem of German submarines attacking British merchant ships during World War II. Thousands of tons of goods are being lost, and it is believed that information is getting to the subs via a radio transmitter in one of three German ships in Portuguese Goa. Because Portugal is neutral in the war, the British forces cannot attack the ships, so a group of older British expatriates are called upon to do it for them.

Crew

Richard Addinsell

Song

Nick Allder

Special Effects

Angela Allen

Script Supervisor

Jorge L Araneta

Coproducer

Graham Attwood

Photography

Barbara Back

Production Assistant

Bert Batt

Assistant Director

Ronnie Bear

Liaison

Maurice Binder

Graphic Designer

Maurice Binder

Titles

Tony Braun

Camera Operator

Karl Breitkopf

Technical Advisor

Leslie Bricusse

Song

Harold Buck

Associate Producer

Roy Budd

Music

Mario Cabral E Sa

Unit Manager

Maurice Cain

Art Director

Syd Cain

Production Designer

W E Catto

Technical Advisor

Chris Chrisafis

Executive Producer

Peter Davies

Assistant Editor

Fritz Dimsak

Technical Advisor

Elsa Fennell

Costumes

Scot Finch

Production Associate

Norman Foster

Production Manager

R K S Ghandi

Technical Advisor

John Glen

Editor

Graham V Hartstone

Sound

David Hildyard

Sound

Tony Imi

Director Of Photography

Kapitan Hans-joachim Krug

Technical Advisor

James Leasor

Source Material (From Novel)

Nicolas Lemessurier

Sound

Euan Lloyd

Producer

Colin Mackenzie

Technical Advisor

Gordon K. Mccallum

Sound

Colin Miller

Sound Editor

Mario Miranda

Assistant

Matt Monro

Song Performer

Peter Pennell

Sound Editor

Lewis Pugh

Technical Advisor

Reginald Rose

Screenplay

Erich Sautter

Technical Advisor

Mohammad Shafi

Production Associate

S K Sharma

Liaison

Rose Tobias Shaw

Casting

Bobby Simmons

Stunt Coordinator

Neville Smallwood

Makeup

Alan Sones

Sound Editor

Robin Tarsnane

Set Decorator

Neville Thompson

Location Manager

Karl Tiegel

Technical Advisor

Kit West

Special Effects

Tony White

Camera Operator

Film Details

Also Known As
Sea Wolves
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adventure
Drama
Thriller
War
Release Date
1980

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Articles

The Sea Wolves


In 1943, the German merchant ship Ehrenfels was sunk in the neutral harbor of Goa, a Portuguese colonial outpost on the coast of India, by British saboteurs. The members of the raiding party received no official recognition for their efforts and details of "Operation Creek" remained top secret until 1978. James Leasor brought the unknown mission to light in his non-fiction book Boarding Party, which revealed the heroic efforts of the Calcutta Light Horse, a civilian regiment of middle-aged British men in colonial India, in stopping a Gestapo spy ring.

Producer Euan Lloyd optioned the book as a follow-up to his 1978 film The Wild Geese and had hoped to reunite the film's three stars. Richard Burton and Richard Harris declined so Gregory Peck and David Niven, who had previously teamed up for a daring and dangerous World War II mission in The Guns of Navarone (1961), joined Roger Moore in the lead roles. The sole American in the cast, Peck adopts a soft British lilt, "But not with pukka Sandhurst accent because if I did nobody would understand me," he explained in an interview. Most of the production team from The Wild Geese also returned, including director Andrew V. McLaglen, screenwriter Reginald Rose, production designer Syd Cain, editor John Glen and title designer Maurice Binder. The latter three were, like Roger Moore, also veterans of the James Bond films.

The real-life Major-General Lewis Pugh (the character played by Peck) served as a technical advisor on the film, which admittedly took some liberties with history. It drew some details from other clandestine operations, notably "Operation Postmaster," and created the fictional Mrs. Cromwell (played by Barbara Kellerman) as a romantic interest for Moore's character. But much of the film was shot on location in India and Goa, and the age of its male cast (most over 60 years of age) speaks to the unusual nature of the real-life mission.

by Sean Axmaker


Sources:
AFI Catalog of Feature Films <br>
Boarding Party, James Leasor. 1978, Houghton Mifflin. <br>
"Operation Creek: Going to War on a River Barge," Dwight Jon Zimmerman. Defense Media Network, August 12, 2013.
"The Day the Weekly was invited to go on location with Gregory Peck, David Niven, and Roger Moore," Bunty Turner. The Australian Women's Weekly, May 14, 1980.

 

The Sea Wolves

The Sea Wolves

In 1943, the German merchant ship Ehrenfels was sunk in the neutral harbor of Goa, a Portuguese colonial outpost on the coast of India, by British saboteurs. The members of the raiding party received no official recognition for their efforts and details of "Operation Creek" remained top secret until 1978. James Leasor brought the unknown mission to light in his non-fiction book Boarding Party, which revealed the heroic efforts of the Calcutta Light Horse, a civilian regiment of middle-aged British men in colonial India, in stopping a Gestapo spy ring.Producer Euan Lloyd optioned the book as a follow-up to his 1978 film The Wild Geese and had hoped to reunite the film's three stars. Richard Burton and Richard Harris declined so Gregory Peck and David Niven, who had previously teamed up for a daring and dangerous World War II mission in The Guns of Navarone (1961), joined Roger Moore in the lead roles. The sole American in the cast, Peck adopts a soft British lilt, "But not with pukka Sandhurst accent because if I did nobody would understand me," he explained in an interview. Most of the production team from The Wild Geese also returned, including director Andrew V. McLaglen, screenwriter Reginald Rose, production designer Syd Cain, editor John Glen and title designer Maurice Binder. The latter three were, like Roger Moore, also veterans of the James Bond films.The real-life Major-General Lewis Pugh (the character played by Peck) served as a technical advisor on the film, which admittedly took some liberties with history. It drew some details from other clandestine operations, notably "Operation Postmaster," and created the fictional Mrs. Cromwell (played by Barbara Kellerman) as a romantic interest for Moore's character. But much of the film was shot on location in India and Goa, and the age of its male cast (most over 60 years of age) speaks to the unusual nature of the real-life mission.by Sean AxmakerSources:AFI Catalog of Feature Films <br>Boarding Party, James Leasor. 1978, Houghton Mifflin. <br>"Operation Creek: Going to War on a River Barge," Dwight Jon Zimmerman. Defense Media Network, August 12, 2013."The Day the Weekly was invited to go on location with Gregory Peck, David Niven, and Roger Moore," Bunty Turner. The Australian Women's Weekly, May 14, 1980. 

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Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1980

Released in United States 1980