Sally and Saint Anne


1h 30m 1952

Brief Synopsis

Sally O'Moyne, a good-natured but awkward school-girl lives with her extended and eccentric Irish-American clan. One day at school, unable to find her lunch bucket, Sally says a prayer to St. Anne in hope of heavenly assistance. When Sally finds her lunch, she believes a miracle has happened, convincing her of a special relationship with the saint. Meanwhile, some animosity between the O'Moyne family and a neighbor grows and manifests itself in various comic situations. The plot develops as Sally, firm in her belief in St. Anne, emerges from adolescence an attractive young woman, and discovers the opposite sex. The feud, along with Sally's personal life, works itself to resolution in this light, nostalgic look at growing up Catholic in the 1940s and 1950s.

Film Details

Also Known As
All Because of Sally; the Story of Sally and Saint Anne
Release Date
Jul 1952
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 16 Jul 1952
Production Company
Universal-International Pictures Co., Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Co., Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Synopsis

When she cannot find her lunch upon arrving at St. Anthony's, her high school, Sally O'Moyne prays to a statue of St. Anne for help. Immediately afterward, she is punished by the Mother Superior when ice man "Gold Tooth" MCarthy finds her lunch on the back of his truck and realizes she hitched a ride into town with him. Sally races to St. Anne and, chastising her for being a "snitcher," declares that McCarthy should get a black eye. When she sees the ice man with a bruised eye the next day, she becomes a true believer. Soon, Sally has purchased a small statue of her saint and is praying for everyone in town, keeping track of their wishes in a small notebook. Six years later, her stack of notebooks has grown, and everyone in town is beholden to St. Anne for such things as Sally's friend Jean's engagement ring and the shopkeeper's first baby boy. One day, Sally, who does not often pray for herself, asks St. Anne to help her family to keep their house, which McCarthy, now an alderman, has scheduled for destruction to make room for a new highway. The entire family--Sally, Mr. and Mrs. O'Moyne and brothers Mike, a magician, Danny, a failing boxer, and Willie, a musician--are eager to save their idyllic home. Sally then visits the soda shop with her new friend, worldly city girl Lois Foran. When Johnny Evans, a college football star on whom Sally has a crush, arrives, Sally is chagrined to note his interest in Lois. At home, meanwhile, local priest Father Kennedy criticizes Sally's grandfather, Pat Ryan, for refusing to die until he has finished his crocheting, regardless of his poor health. McCarthy visits with his lawyer, Parker, and insists once again that Grandpa sign over a small parcel of land he owns, which sits between McCarthy's two downtown highrises. Grandpa, who loves the little lot, decides to thwart McCarthy by having their current house moved there. When Sally, who secretly unravels Grandpa's crocheting each night, tells him about Johnny, he advises her to use "bait" to catch him and points to sophisticated Jean as an example. Sally asks a soda jerk, Henry, to take her to the country club dance, and stops at Jean's beforehand for a makeover. When they arrive at the dance, Johnny is awed by Sally's newfound beauty and elegance and leaves Lois to pursue her. When he takes her parking, however, she is overwhelmed by his advances and runs home. There, she finds that she is so late the house has already been moved across town, and she must walk there in her high heels. The next day, McCarthy, furious with the O'Moynes for moving their house next to his modern apartments, orders the police to ticket the family for every possible minor violation. Meanwhile, Johnny visits and, when Sally refuses to speak to him, takes Grandpa's advice to settle into the house until she will be forced to acknowledge him. At dinner, McCarthy arrives to declare that their tree is choking the water pipes and must be cut down immediately. Although Grandpa planted the tree himself, they are forced to comply, but when the boys chop it down, it falls on McCarthy's building and causes $2,000 worth of damage. McCarthy offers to buy the site for the amount of the damages, which will leave the family homeless, but Danny announces that an upcoming fight with the local champion will pay the same amount. As he has lost every fight to date, his brothers keep him up all night, "training" him in the arts of deception and rhythm. Unable to sleep, Grandpa leaves his bed for the first time in months. As he paces up and down the plot, he realizes that McCarthy's building occupies a small fraction of his land. At the fight the next day, Danny is losing badly until he becomes so addled that he dances around the ring, shocking his opponent into submission. He wins the prize money. That night when McCarthy interrupts the family's dinner, they triumphantly present him with the check. Grandpa then announces that Johnny has procured McCarthy's original architectural plans, which indicate that the buildings are illegally placed. Although McCarthy offers the family anything it wants, Grandpa asks only for an end to the feud. Before he leaves, McCarthy quietly offers to plant a new tree for them, and Grandpa, impressed, declares that they will all go to church together. Sally, blowing a kiss to St. Anne, calls McCarthy "neighbor."

Film Details

Also Known As
All Because of Sally; the Story of Sally and Saint Anne
Release Date
Jul 1952
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 16 Jul 1952
Production Company
Universal-International Pictures Co., Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Co., Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Some reviews and advertisements refer to the film's title as All Because of Sally; the Story of "Sally and Saint Anne". According to Hollywood Reporter's "Rambling Reporter," Universal worked with the Catholic Church to finalize the story. A Hollywood Reporter news item reported that actor Harvey Lembeck was a cast member, but he was not in the released film.