Sally


1h 43m 1929
Sally

Brief Synopsis

A waitress dreams of becoming a Broadway star.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Musical
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 12, 1929
Premiere Information
New York premiere: 23 Dec 1929
Production Company
First National Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the musical Sally , book by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse, music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Clifford Grey (New York, 21 Dec 1920).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m
Sound
Vitaphone
Color
Black and White, Color (2-strip Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
9,277ft (12 reels)

Synopsis

Sally, a cafe hostess and orphan, aspires to become a dancer. She is loved by Blair Farquar, of an aristocratic family, though his father has arranged a match with Marcia Ten Brock. Forced to leave the cafe when she spills food on the suit of Otis Hooper, a booking agent, she gets a job at the Balkan Tavern, run by "Pops" Shendorff, onetime supporter of a former grand duke who now works as a waiter and is known as Connie. Encouraged to dance for the customers, Sally is a sensation, and when Hooper engages her to impersonate a Russian dancer who has eloped, she and Connie are lionized at Mrs. Ten Brock's party. When Sally learns Farquar is engaged to Marcia, however, she leaves the party in despair. Hooper finds her in a tenement and stars her in his follies, and on her opening night, she is reunited with her lover. Their marriage follows.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Musical
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 12, 1929
Premiere Information
New York premiere: 23 Dec 1929
Production Company
First National Pictures
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the musical Sally , book by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse, music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Clifford Grey (New York, 21 Dec 1920).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m
Sound
Vitaphone
Color
Black and White, Color (2-strip Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.33 : 1
Film Length
9,277ft (12 reels)

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1930

Articles

Sally (1930) -


After Warner's success with On With The Show (1929), executives quickly made plans for more all talking, all color movies like this one, a "working girl makes good" fable about a waitress (Marilyn Miller) who, after being discovered on the job by theatrical agent Otis Hooper (T. Roy Barnes), uses her natural hoofing ability to work her way through the song-and-dance ranks and emerge triumphant on Broadway. The Jerome Kern song 'Look For The Silver Lining" appears here, long before before its renditions by Judy Garland (once, while playing Miller in Till The Clouds Roll By [1946]) became inexorably linked with the ill-fated child star. The original print was two-strip Technicolor, but, like many early color movies, only black and white prints remain. Fortuitously, however, when portions of the "Wild Rose" number were uncovered in the 1990s, they were restored into extant prints. Marilyn Miller's blonde joie de vivre in that number makes it easy to see why 20th cent executive Ben Lyon would later christen Norma Jeane after her as "Marilyn Monroe".

By Violet LeVoit
Sally (1930) -

Sally (1930) -

After Warner's success with On With The Show (1929), executives quickly made plans for more all talking, all color movies like this one, a "working girl makes good" fable about a waitress (Marilyn Miller) who, after being discovered on the job by theatrical agent Otis Hooper (T. Roy Barnes), uses her natural hoofing ability to work her way through the song-and-dance ranks and emerge triumphant on Broadway. The Jerome Kern song 'Look For The Silver Lining" appears here, long before before its renditions by Judy Garland (once, while playing Miller in Till The Clouds Roll By [1946]) became inexorably linked with the ill-fated child star. The original print was two-strip Technicolor, but, like many early color movies, only black and white prints remain. Fortuitously, however, when portions of the "Wild Rose" number were uncovered in the 1990s, they were restored into extant prints. Marilyn Miller's blonde joie de vivre in that number makes it easy to see why 20th cent executive Ben Lyon would later christen Norma Jeane after her as "Marilyn Monroe". By Violet LeVoit

Quotes

Trivia

Although this film survives in black and white, the color sequences are lost.

Fragments of the color film for the "Wild Rose" song and dance number were found in the 1990s and have been intercut into the print that Turner Classic Movies shows on its cable channel.

Notes

Remake of the 1925 silent film of the same title.