Saint Louis Blues


1h 32m 1939

Film Details

Also Known As
Best of the Blues
Release Date
Feb 3, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Synopsis

Fleeing from her Broadway role as Aloma, the South Sea siren in a sarong, singer Norma Malone seeks sanctuary on the Mississippi, where she meets Dave Guerney, the impresario of a showboat. Norma convinces Dave to give her a job on the boat, but he refuses to give her a part in his show, claiming that she is an amateur and cannot sing properly. Nevertheless, Norma falls in love with Dave, sticking with him through a run of bad luck. Disaster strikes when the boat becomes mired in river mud, and after finally getting free, the troupe becomes involved in a fierce battle with a rival troupe and lands in jail. When Norma wins their release by singing an appealing lullabye that touches the judge's heart, Dave realizes that he has a real singer in his troupe and begins to build Norma up as he falls in love with her. Norma's notoriety attracts the attention of her erstwhile manager, Ivar DeBrett, who has been searching for her. Threatening a breach of contract suit, Ivar tries to prevent Norma's appearance in Dave's revue, but Norma wins her freedom through a technicality in her contract and remains with the Dave, the man she loves.

Film Details

Also Known As
Best of the Blues
Release Date
Feb 3, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this picture was Best of the Blues. According to a news item in Motion Picture Daily, Lloyd Nolan was assigned the role of Dave Guerney after George Raft refused to appear in the picture. An early Hollywood Reporter production chart lists Ted Tetzlaff as photographer. The onscreen credits read "permission granted by W. C. Handy for the use of his musical composition and the title St. Louis Blues."