The Rookie


2h 1m 1990

Brief Synopsis

A rookie policeman from a wealthy family teams up with a tough veteran officer to stop a dangerous car-theft ring.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rookie, Rookie - nykomlingen
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Action
Adventure
Comedy
Crime
Drama
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Brent Johnson
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Synopsis

A rookie policeman from a wealthy family teams up with a tough veteran officer to stop a dangerous car-theft ring.

Crew

Edward Aiona

Property Master

John Alden

Stunts

Bobby Aldridge

Stunts

Robert Apisa

Stunts

John Ashby

Stunts

Bub Asman

Sound Editor

Vincent J Baldino

Camera Operator

Perry Barndt

Stunts

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

Gary Baxley

Stunts

Matt Earl Beesley

Assistant Director

John Berger

Set Designer

Sandy Berumen

Stunts

Simone Boisseree

Stunts

Randy Bostic

Swing Gang

Bradley J Bovee

Stunts

Eddie Braun

Stunts

Kathy Brock

Stunts

Laura Brown

Location Assistant

Troy Brown

Stunts

Brian Burrows

Stunts

Judy Cammer

Production Designer

Frank Capra

Assistant Director

Phil Chong

Stunts

Carl Ciarfalio

Stunts

Michael Cipriano

Assistant Editor

Roydon Clark

Stunts

Murray Close

Photography

Virginia Cook-mcgowan

Sound Editor

Chuck Courtney

Stunts

Joel Cox

Editor

Tom Cranham

Visual Effects

Charlie Croughwell

Stunts

Phil Culotta

Stunts

David D Darling

Stunts

Jani Davis

Stunts

Deborah A Discoe

Stunts

Richard Duran

Stunts

Kenny Endoso

Stunts

Jeannie Epper

Stunts

Kurtis Epper

Stunts

Stephanie Epper

Stunts

Edward Espinoza

Swing Gang

Donna Evans Merlo

Stunts

Robert Fernandez

Music

Frank Ferrara

Stunts

Cindy Folkerson

Stunts

John Frazier

Special Effects Supervisor

Les Fresholtz

Sound

Rocky Allen Gehr

Special Effects Foreman

Steve Geray

Stunts

Susan Germaine

Hair

Andree Gibbs

Stunts

Al Goto

Stunts

Jack N Green

Director Of Photography

Jack N Green

Dp/Cinematographer

Kelly Richard Green

Assistant Camera Operator

William S Grisco

Stunts

Ralph Gulko

Makeup

Michael Hancock

Makeup

Donald Harris

Music Editor

Orwin Harvey

Stunts

Robert G Henderson

Sound Editor

Eddie Hice

Stunts

Richard Hill

Stunts

Richard Hobaica

Property Master Assistant

Larry Holt

Stunts

Deborah Hopper

Costume Supervisor

David M Horton

Sound Editor

David L Horton

Foley Editor

Phyllis Huffman

Casting

Steve Husch

Swing Gang

Jeff Imada

Stunts

Steven Ito

Stunts

Terry Jackson

Stunts

Dean Jeffries

Stunts

Gary Jensen

Stunts

Michael Jiron

Sound

Brent Johnson

Cable Operator

Don Johnson

Sound Mixer

Howard Kazanjian

Producer

Wayne A King

Stunts

Bruce Kuroyama

Special Effects

Bill Lane

Stunts

Walt Larue

Stunts

Patrick Lee

Special Effects

Terry Leonard

Stunt Coordinator

Will Leong

Stunts

Antoinette Levine

Location Manager

Clay Lilley

Stunts

Carey Loftin

Stunts

Godfrey Marks

Adr Editor

Darrin Martin

Sound Editor

Cotton Mather

Stunts

Michael Maurer

Production Accountant

Michael Maurer

Stunts

Dan May

Set Decorator

Matt Mccolm

Stunts

Michael H Mcgaughy

Stunts

Cole Mckay

Stunts

Cheryl Meier

Location Assistant

John C. Meier

Stunts

Tom Morga

Stunts

Alan Robert Murray

Sound Editor

Cheree L Nelson

Stunts

Lloyd Nelson

Script Supervisor

Larry Nicholas

Stunts

Lennie Niehaus

Music

Donna Noguchi

Stunts

Jimmy Ortega

Stunts

Debi Parker

Stunts

Jayme S Parker

Sound Editor

Victor Perez

Lighting Technician

David Perna

Stunts

Robert Phillips

Special Effects

Denney Pierce

Stunts

Vern Poore

Sound

Jeff Ramsey

Stunts

Steven Riley

Special Effects

Tony Rivetti

Camera Assistant

Mario Roberts

Stunts

J.p. Romano

Stunts

Ronnie Rondell

Stunts

Thomas Rosales Jr.

Stunts

Kerry Rossall

Stunts

David Rowden

Stunts

Paul Ryan

Special Effects

Bill Ryusaki

Stunts

George Sack

Stunts

Michael L Schwake

Dolly Grip

Ben R Scott

Stunts

John-clay Scott

Stunts

Hal Selig

Special Effects

Alex Sharp

Stunts

Karen E. Shaw

Other

Jerry Sidell

Camera Assistant

Steven Siebert

Producer

Spike Silver

Stunts

James Simcik

Adr Editor

Al Simon

Stunts

Mychal Smith

Boom Operator

Dawn Snyder

Set Designer

Russell Solberg

Stunts

Bruce Spellman

Grip

Scott Spiegel

Screenplay

Stephen St John

Camera Operator

Jan Steele

Stunts

Tom Stern

Lighting Technician

Robert C Stewart

Costumes

Joe Stone

Stunts

A J Thrasher

Special Effects

R L Tobert

Stunts

Patricia Ann Trbovich

Costumes

David Valdes

Production Manager

David Valdes

Producer

Wayne Van Horn

Stunts

Edward S Verreaux

Art Director

Brooke Henderson Ward

Sound Editor

Mike Watson

Stunts

Jeffrey Wetzel

Assistant Director

Rosemarie Wheeler

Sound Editor

Jim Wilkey

Stunts

Jerry Wills

Stunts

Marshall Winn

Sound Editor

Butch Wolf

Foley Editor

Danny Wong

Stunts

Glenn Wright

Costume Supervisor

Boaz Yakin

Screenplay

Bill F Young

Stunts

William C Young

Key Grip

Film Details

Also Known As
Rookie, Rookie - nykomlingen
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Action
Adventure
Comedy
Crime
Drama
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Brent Johnson
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Articles

The Rookie


Warner Home Video recently delved into the significant workload that Clint Eastwood has rendered for the studio to offer up many of his features for first-time release to DVD. While this has been a source of celebration for Eastwood fans, only the most hardcore amongst them need apply for The Rookie (1990), an extremely by-the-numbers cop thriller that has some nice stunt work in its set pieces to commend it and not a whole lot else.

The narrative casts the director/star as Nick Pulovski, an expectedly hard-bitten veteran of the LAPD's grand theft auto detail, and the early going finds his staged sting of a luxury car boosting ring going horribly awry. The botch leads to Nick's partner getting gunned down, and the payoff of a freeway chase where the bad guys jettison the goods from a moving tractor-trailer in order to cut off Pulovski's pursuit.

Of course, the department picks this juncture to team Nick with a young cop on his first plainclothes assignment, titular tyro David Ackerman (Charlie Sheen). Ackerman isn't without baggage of his own; haunted by the role he played in the childhood death of his brother, Ackerman is compelled to seek out the riskiest beat available, much to the consternation of his law school student girlfriend (Lara Flynn Boyle) and his rich businessman father (Tom Skerritt).

As Pulovski grudgingly indoctrinates David during the investigation, they exert increasing pressure on the activities of the heist ring, to the building ire of mastermind Strom (Raul Julia) and his sultry bodyguard/mistress Liesl (Sonia Braga). The crooks are intent on cutting their losses by ripping off their mob sponsors and leaving town; Nick's attempt to stop the robbery only results in his capture, and the novice Ackerman becomes his only means of getting out alive.

The Rookie is no worse than any number of crusty vet/greenhorn partner actioners that went before, but nor is it any better. Ostensibly mounted by Eastwood as a thank-you gesture to Warner for getting behind the decidedly less commercial White Hunter, Black Heart (1990), The Rookie suffered from being too familiar in its content, and its domestic receipts at $21 million were disappointing. Clint's work before and behind the camera here is competent but rote, as he seems to be primarily searching for a catchphrase that will click.

Sheen, caught here back in the days before his name elicited lewd smirks, is one-note but serviceable, showing signs of decent deadpan comic rapport with Eastwood and very effective in the showcase where he torches a biker bar in search of Pulovski. Julia and Braga may be the most improbably cast Teutons in film history, and while neither was given much challenge by their parts, the scene where Liesl had her way with a handcuffed and helpless Pulovski gave Clint his kinkiest screen moment since Tightrope (1984).

As before, The Rookie's primary values come from its elaborate action sequences, which belie the film's relatively modest budget and remind us now living in the CGI era how effective the results of good stunt work can be. In addition to the aforementioned scenes, the moments where Pulovski pilots a Mercedes out the upper floor of an exploding warehouse remains particularly eye-popping. All in all, though, The Rookie stands as the type of pat vehicle that ultimately necessitated for Eastwood the career jump-start provided by Unforgiven (1992).

Warner digitally transferred The Rookie for DVD release, and the images are sharp and do service to the muted palate used by cinematographer Jack N. Green. An effective effort was also put in on the soundtrack, which was remastered in Dolby 5.1; a spoken French-language track is included. The amamorphic widescreen presentation preserves the theatrical 1.85:1 aspect ratio. The extra features are spare, with only the theatrical trailer and an Eastwood filmography included.

For more information about The Rookie, visit Warner Video. To order The Rookie, go to TCM Shopping.

by Jay S. Steinberg
The Rookie

The Rookie

Warner Home Video recently delved into the significant workload that Clint Eastwood has rendered for the studio to offer up many of his features for first-time release to DVD. While this has been a source of celebration for Eastwood fans, only the most hardcore amongst them need apply for The Rookie (1990), an extremely by-the-numbers cop thriller that has some nice stunt work in its set pieces to commend it and not a whole lot else. The narrative casts the director/star as Nick Pulovski, an expectedly hard-bitten veteran of the LAPD's grand theft auto detail, and the early going finds his staged sting of a luxury car boosting ring going horribly awry. The botch leads to Nick's partner getting gunned down, and the payoff of a freeway chase where the bad guys jettison the goods from a moving tractor-trailer in order to cut off Pulovski's pursuit. Of course, the department picks this juncture to team Nick with a young cop on his first plainclothes assignment, titular tyro David Ackerman (Charlie Sheen). Ackerman isn't without baggage of his own; haunted by the role he played in the childhood death of his brother, Ackerman is compelled to seek out the riskiest beat available, much to the consternation of his law school student girlfriend (Lara Flynn Boyle) and his rich businessman father (Tom Skerritt). As Pulovski grudgingly indoctrinates David during the investigation, they exert increasing pressure on the activities of the heist ring, to the building ire of mastermind Strom (Raul Julia) and his sultry bodyguard/mistress Liesl (Sonia Braga). The crooks are intent on cutting their losses by ripping off their mob sponsors and leaving town; Nick's attempt to stop the robbery only results in his capture, and the novice Ackerman becomes his only means of getting out alive. The Rookie is no worse than any number of crusty vet/greenhorn partner actioners that went before, but nor is it any better. Ostensibly mounted by Eastwood as a thank-you gesture to Warner for getting behind the decidedly less commercial White Hunter, Black Heart (1990), The Rookie suffered from being too familiar in its content, and its domestic receipts at $21 million were disappointing. Clint's work before and behind the camera here is competent but rote, as he seems to be primarily searching for a catchphrase that will click. Sheen, caught here back in the days before his name elicited lewd smirks, is one-note but serviceable, showing signs of decent deadpan comic rapport with Eastwood and very effective in the showcase where he torches a biker bar in search of Pulovski. Julia and Braga may be the most improbably cast Teutons in film history, and while neither was given much challenge by their parts, the scene where Liesl had her way with a handcuffed and helpless Pulovski gave Clint his kinkiest screen moment since Tightrope (1984). As before, The Rookie's primary values come from its elaborate action sequences, which belie the film's relatively modest budget and remind us now living in the CGI era how effective the results of good stunt work can be. In addition to the aforementioned scenes, the moments where Pulovski pilots a Mercedes out the upper floor of an exploding warehouse remains particularly eye-popping. All in all, though, The Rookie stands as the type of pat vehicle that ultimately necessitated for Eastwood the career jump-start provided by Unforgiven (1992). Warner digitally transferred The Rookie for DVD release, and the images are sharp and do service to the muted palate used by cinematographer Jack N. Green. An effective effort was also put in on the soundtrack, which was remastered in Dolby 5.1; a spoken French-language track is included. The amamorphic widescreen presentation preserves the theatrical 1.85:1 aspect ratio. The extra features are spare, with only the theatrical trailer and an Eastwood filmography included. For more information about The Rookie, visit Warner Video. To order The Rookie, go to TCM Shopping. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video May 22, 1991

Released in United States Winter December 7, 1990

Began shooting April 16, 1990.

Completed shooting July 13, 1990.

Formerly a Guber-Peters project, but remained at Warner Bros without the producers.

Released in United States on Video May 22, 1991

Released in United States Winter December 7, 1990