Romancing the Stone


1h 46m 1984
Romancing the Stone

Brief Synopsis

A romance novelist travels to Columbia to search for her missing sister and meets an American adventurer.

Film Details

Also Known As
Den vilda jakten på stenen, À la poursuite du diamant vert
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Action
Adventure
Release Date
1984
Location
Mexico

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m

Synopsis

A repressed romance novelist travels to Colombia to uncover the mystery behind her sister's disappearance. Once there, she meets up with a rough-and-tumble American adventurer whom she hires to help her in her search. The two embark on an adventure involving a valuable gem and some dastardly villians, but a budding love affair is not far behind.

Crew

Jorge Azcarate

Assistant Editor

Claudia Becker

Casting

Bruce Birmelin

Photography

Peter Bloch

Other

Kathryn Blondell

Hair

Jack Brodsky

Coproducer

Donn Cambern

Editor

Charles L Campbell

Sound Editor

James Campbell

Original Music

Thomas Carlin

Music Editor

Larry Carow

Sound Editor

Javier Carreno

Assistant Director

Tom Case

Makeup

Kerry Colonna

Other

Laurencio Cordero

Special Effects Coordinator

Samuel C Crutcher

Sound Editor

Dr Crypton

Production Designer

Dean Cundey

Director Of Photography

Dean Cundey

Dp/Cinematographer

Tracy Keehn Dashnaw

Stunts

Vince Deadrick

Stunt Coordinator

Vince Deadrick

Stunts

Don Digirolamo

Sound

Lem Dobbs

Screenplay

Michael Dobie

Sound Editor

Joel Douglas

Coproducer

Joel Douglas

Assistant Director

Michael Douglas

Producer

Louis L Edemann

Sound Editor

Eurlyne Epper

Stunts

Jeannie Epper

Stunts

Ken Estes

Special Effects

Enrique Estevez

Set Decorator

Robert W Glass

Sound

Nikki Allyn Grosso

Production Coordinator

Miguel Gurza

Animal Trainer

Richard Hart

Camera Operator

Jeffrey Hornaday

Choreographer

Augustin Huarte

Art Director

Dean Jeffries

Stunts

George Jenson

Production

Cesar Jimenez

Location Manager

William B. Kaplan

Sound

Jay B King

Special Effects

Robert W King

Special Effects

Terry W King

Special Effects

Robert Knudson

Sound

Terry Leonard

Unit Director

Terry Leonard

Stunt Coordinator

Raul Martinez

Stunts

Antonio Mata

Props

William Meshover

Assistant Editor

Joe Moore

Assistant Director

Robert Moore

Special Effects

Geraldo Moreno

Stunts

Victor Moreno

Stunts

Frank Morriss

Editor

Bill Myatt

Special Effects Coordinator

Tom Nixon

Music

Jose Maria Ochoa

Assistant Director

Juana Oliver

Costumes

Theodore R Parvin

Production Consultant

Lawrence G Paull

Production Designer

David Pettijohn

Sound Editor

Karen Rae

Casting

Rudy Reachi

Props

Carlos Rodriguez

Unit Production Manager

Alfredo Ruvalcaba

Photography

Victoria Rose Sampson

Adr Editor

Dennis Sands

Music

Nina Saxon

Titles

Marshall Schlom

Production Coordinator

John D Schofield

Unit Production Manager

Alan Silvestri

Music

Larry Singer

Adr Editor

Tom Southwell

Graphics

Kevin Stitt

Assistant Editor

Roger Sword

Sound Editor

Gilda Texter

Costume Supervisor

Diane Thomas

Screenplay

Robert C. Thomas

Camera Operator

Marilyn Vance-straker

Costume Designer

Enrique Villavicencio

Costumes

Ronald Woodward

Key Grip

Karen Wookey

Script Supervisor

Videos

Movie Clip

Romancing The Stone (1984) - Even In Colombia Having taken the wrong bus, which has now crashed, in her attempt to ransom her kidnapped sister, bumbling romance novelist Joan (Kathleen Turner) is approached by the mysterious Zolo (Manuel Ojeda), then rescued by Michael Douglas, in his first appearance, in Romancing The Stone, 1984.
Romancing The Stone (1984) - Some Kind Of Treasure Map First scene for Danny De Vito (as Ralph) and Zack Norman (as Ira), involved in the kidnapping of Elaine (Mary Ellen Trainor) in Colombia, who’s mailed the treasure map they’re after to her absent-minded romance novelist sister Joan (Kathleen Turner) in New York, in Romancing The Stone, 1984.
Romancing The Stone (1984) - You're A Mondo Dizmo Adventurer Jack (Michael Douglas, also the producer) and romance novelist Joan (Kathleen Turner) are warming to each other, and burning pot for heat in the wreck of a drug-smuggling plane in the Colombian jungle, considering how to ransom her kidnapped sister, in Romancing The Stone, 1984.
Romancing The Stone (1984) - That Woman Makes Me Hungry Running out of options as they enter a Colombian town run by drug gangs, adventurer Jack (Michael Douglas) and romance novelist Joan (Kathleen Turner) get lucky, discovering that Juan (Alfonso Arau) is a big fan, evil Zolo (Manuel Ojeda) still on their trail, in Romancing The Stone, 1984.
Romancing The Stone (1984) - Welcome To Colombia! Both their plans upset by the same bus wreck, American bird-smuggler Jack (Michael Douglas, who also produced) has agreed for $375 in Traveler’s Checks to help sidetracked romance novelist Joan (Kathleen Turner) find a phone, early in Robert Zemeckis’ Romancing The Stone, 1984.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Den vilda jakten på stenen, À la poursuite du diamant vert
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Action
Adventure
Release Date
1984
Location
Mexico

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m

Award Nominations

Best Editing

1984
Donn Cambern

Best Editing

1984
Frank Morriss

Articles

Romancing the Stone


With a skillful, crowd-pleasing blend of romance, adventure and comedy, it's little wonder why Romancing the Stone was such a hit in its day, despite its rather odd title (no, it's not about dating Keith Richards).

The film earned close to $80 million at the global box office, the eighth highest-grossing release of 1984 - not bad for a year that included Ghostbusters, Beverly Hills Cop, Gremlins, Footloose and the first Indiana Jones sequel. The winning chemistry between lead actors Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas cemented their status as major stars of the decade. It also gave director Robert Zemeckis his first bona fide blockbuster hit after his feature debuts: the affable but hardly stellar I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978) and Used Cars (1980).

Following her sizzling debut in Body Heat (1981) and first comic turn in The Man with Two Brains (1983), Turner played against her sexpot image as a New York-based author of steamy romantic thrillers whose real life is anything but steamy, romantic or thrilling. A desperate call from her sister takes her to South America to retrieve a priceless jewel. Failure means her sister's certain death.

Completely at sea in the world she's been summoned to, she hooks up with a rough-and-tumble adventurer and smuggler of exotic birds (Douglas). The dangerous animals, dastardly villains, corrupt officials, physical hardships and sexual heat building between the mismatched pair may well remind viewers of The African Queen (1951), updated for the more frank 80s.

The soldier of fortune role was reportedly offered first to Clint Eastwood, Jack Nicholson and Christopher Reeve. Douglas, at the time known mostly from his work in the TV cop series The Streets of San Francisco, had made a cinema breakthrough with important parts in Coma (1978) and The China Syndrome (1979), but his role here brought him to the forefront of bankable leading men. Over the next 10 years he made the hits Fatal Attraction (1987), Basic Instinct (1992) and his Oscar-winning role in Wall Street (1987).

Turner followed this with acclaimed performances in Prizzi's Honor (1985) and Peggy Sue Got Married (1986).

According to Turner's memoir, Debra Winger was considered for the role of the author but Turner got the part when Winger allegedly bit Douglas, who produced the picture, in the Mexican restaurant where they met to discuss the production.

Although set in Colombia, the movie was filmed mostly in Mexico, except for opening scenes in New York City. A few scenes were filmed in Utah.

The film got positive reviews overall. It won Golden Globe awards for Best Picture - Musical or Comedy and Best Actress - Musical or Comedy. Turner also won Best Actress from the Los Angeles Film Critics, along with her performance in Ken Russel's Crimes of Passion (1984).

Upon its release, some reviewers compared Romancing the Stone - mostly unfavorably - to Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981). The script, however, was actually written in 1979. This was the first and only credit for screenwriter Diana Thomas, who was killed in an accident in a car given to her by Douglas. The Turner-Douglas sequel, Jewel of the Nile (1985), was dedicated to Thomas. Ironically, at the time of her death she had reportedly completed a draft of a Raiders sequel. For a supporting comic role as a New York gangster also in pursuit of the jewel (and equally out of his depth in the South American jungle), Douglas cast his former roommate Danny DeVito, who had just completed a successful five-year run in the cast of the TV comedy Taxi. DeVito later directed Turner and Douglas in their third and final film together, the black comedy The War of the Roses (1989), as a married couple whose loving relationship goes murderously south.

Like his two stars, Zemeckis went on to great success in the 1980s, directing all three Back to the Future movies and Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) , featuring the voice of Kathleen Turner as Jessica Rabbit (despite their clashes during the filming of Romancing the Stone). He later won the Best Director Academy Award for Forrest Gump (1994).

Director: Robert Zemeckis
Producer: Michael Douglas
Screenplay: Diane Thomas
Cinematography: Dean Cundey
Editing: Donn Cambern, Frank Morriss
Art Direction: Agustin Ituarte
Original Music: Alan Silvestri
Cast: Michael Douglas (Jack Colton), Kathleen Turner (Joan Wilder), Danny DeVito (Ralph), Zack Norman (Ira), Alfonso Arau (Juan), Manuel Ojeda (Zolo)

By Rob Nixon
Romancing The Stone

Romancing the Stone

With a skillful, crowd-pleasing blend of romance, adventure and comedy, it's little wonder why Romancing the Stone was such a hit in its day, despite its rather odd title (no, it's not about dating Keith Richards). The film earned close to $80 million at the global box office, the eighth highest-grossing release of 1984 - not bad for a year that included Ghostbusters, Beverly Hills Cop, Gremlins, Footloose and the first Indiana Jones sequel. The winning chemistry between lead actors Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas cemented their status as major stars of the decade. It also gave director Robert Zemeckis his first bona fide blockbuster hit after his feature debuts: the affable but hardly stellar I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978) and Used Cars (1980). Following her sizzling debut in Body Heat (1981) and first comic turn in The Man with Two Brains (1983), Turner played against her sexpot image as a New York-based author of steamy romantic thrillers whose real life is anything but steamy, romantic or thrilling. A desperate call from her sister takes her to South America to retrieve a priceless jewel. Failure means her sister's certain death. Completely at sea in the world she's been summoned to, she hooks up with a rough-and-tumble adventurer and smuggler of exotic birds (Douglas). The dangerous animals, dastardly villains, corrupt officials, physical hardships and sexual heat building between the mismatched pair may well remind viewers of The African Queen (1951), updated for the more frank 80s. The soldier of fortune role was reportedly offered first to Clint Eastwood, Jack Nicholson and Christopher Reeve. Douglas, at the time known mostly from his work in the TV cop series The Streets of San Francisco, had made a cinema breakthrough with important parts in Coma (1978) and The China Syndrome (1979), but his role here brought him to the forefront of bankable leading men. Over the next 10 years he made the hits Fatal Attraction (1987), Basic Instinct (1992) and his Oscar-winning role in Wall Street (1987). Turner followed this with acclaimed performances in Prizzi's Honor (1985) and Peggy Sue Got Married (1986). According to Turner's memoir, Debra Winger was considered for the role of the author but Turner got the part when Winger allegedly bit Douglas, who produced the picture, in the Mexican restaurant where they met to discuss the production. Although set in Colombia, the movie was filmed mostly in Mexico, except for opening scenes in New York City. A few scenes were filmed in Utah. The film got positive reviews overall. It won Golden Globe awards for Best Picture - Musical or Comedy and Best Actress - Musical or Comedy. Turner also won Best Actress from the Los Angeles Film Critics, along with her performance in Ken Russel's Crimes of Passion (1984). Upon its release, some reviewers compared Romancing the Stone - mostly unfavorably - to Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981). The script, however, was actually written in 1979. This was the first and only credit for screenwriter Diana Thomas, who was killed in an accident in a car given to her by Douglas. The Turner-Douglas sequel, Jewel of the Nile (1985), was dedicated to Thomas. Ironically, at the time of her death she had reportedly completed a draft of a Raiders sequel.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted Best Actress (Turner) by the 1984 Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Released in United States Spring March 30, 1984

Re-released in United States on Video February 6, 1996

Released in USA on video.

Completed shooting March 1983.

Re-released in United States on Video February 6, 1996 (Double Pack--Jewel of the Nile, The)

Released in United States Spring March 30, 1984