The Rebel Set


1h 12m 1959

Film Details

Also Known As
Beatsville
Release Date
Aug 1959
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
E & L Productions
Distribution Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 12m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Film Length
6,494ft

Synopsis

In Los Angeles, Mr. Tucker owns a beatnik-style coffeehouse that serves as a front for his petty scam business conducted with the assistance of street thief Sidney Horner. One evening, the shrewd, unflappable Tucker asks Sid to summon three men to the coffeehouse after closing hours: washed-up actor John Mapes, spoiled socialite but crack rifle-shot George Leland and frustrated but clever writer Ray Miller. At his small, studio apartment, John cheerfully greets his weary wife Jeanne when she returns from work. Although very much in love with her husband, Jeanne frets because he has been unemployed for more than a year. When Sid telephones, John tells Jeanne that he has a late night meeting with a producer to discuss a part. After calling John, Sid goes to the local jail where he bails out the hot-headed George who, as the son of popular actress Rita Leland, wonders about Tucker's invitation. John then retrieves a drunken Ray from his rundown flat. At the coffeehouse meeting that night, Tucker proposes that they steal a million dollars from an armored car. When the men express puzzlement, Tucker informs them he has selected them because he knows their individual, failed circumstances and knows they are each desperate for money. Assuring them that he has carefully planned out the heist and that each would be guaranteed $200,000 apiece, Tucker details the strategy, which entails the men taking a train to Chicago, where they will have four hours to rob the truck transporting money from a nearby racetrack. After the robbery, the men will proceed to New York where they will disperse. When John, George and Ray hesitatingly agree to the scheme, Tucker gives them money to buy fresh clothing and tidy themselves for the next day's journey. Back at home, Jeanne asks John about the "audition" and he explains he must travel to New York. Delighted to see John's "advance," Jeanne declares she will accompany him. The next day, Tucker and Sid set off for Chicago by car and the others take the train that evening. Once onboard the train, George and Ray are startled to find John in the dining car with Jeanne and Ray expresses misgivings about her presence. After a long journey, the restless men arrive in Chicago where Tucker and Sid await. John convinces the puzzled Jeanne that he has arranged to meet another producer during their layover, but feels more comfortable going alone. Tucker, George and Sid take another car to a lonely stretch of road outside of town, near the racetrack, where the armored car will pass. Tucker marks the road for George, who is to shoot out the armored truck tire. Sid positions the car around the bend and after applying fake blood to his head and face, puts on a helmet. When the armored truck appears on schedule, George shoots out a front tire as Sid pulls out in front of the careening truck. Sid's car is knocked over a small embankment and before the anxious truck guards jump out to help, Sid removes the helmet and hides it. As the guards assist the "injured" Sid from the car, John and Ray, dressed as policeman driving Tucker's disguised car, arrive only to draw their guns, then bind and gag the guards. Tucker joins the men to transfer the money to their car before driving several miles down the road. The group then buries the uniforms and pistols and restores the car to its normal appearance before driving back to the station, arriving moments before departure. Before boarding, Tucker, disguised as a cleric, places the money in a large gift box that the nervous George carries onboard. Soon after the train pulls away, news of the heist spreads, prompting John to grow anxious. Just outside of the city on the east-bound highway, a police roadblock stops Sid, who did not board the train but has driven on alone, and he is searched and released without incident. On board the train, a tense John leaves Jeanne in their compartment to consult with George, who he discovers has kept a pistol against Tucker's orders. George declares his intention to keep all of the money and John, now overcome with guilt, assures him he can have his share. When John tries to get George to surrender the gun, however, the men fight and John knocks out Georget. Now frightened, John takes the gift box of money to Ray's room and tells him of George's intentions. John then convinces a skeptical Ray to meet with George, but upon reaching his compartment, they are shocked to find him dead from a gunshot wound to the head. A typed note indicates George committed suicide, but Ray recognizes the type print as coming from his typewriter, which he has brought on the trip. Anxious to dispose of the typewriter, Ray gets the machine but just after tossing it from the train, is attacked and knifed to death by Tucker, who then throws Ray's body from the train. Meanwhile, the conductor has found George's body and calls ahead to the police in Newark. When Jeanne discovers a large amount of money in John's pocket, he breaks down and confesses his involvement in the robbery. Horrified to learn of George's death, Jeanne asks John what he will do. After the train pulls into Newark, police board it to inspect George's body and John turns himself in to a plainclothes detective as Tucker confidently disembarks carrying a satchel with the money. Upon offering to show the detective the money, John is aghast to find the gift box in Ray's room full of telephone books. Spotting Tucker on the platform, John races after him and Jeanne prevents the police from shooting at him. The police follow John, who chases Tucker across the train yard and into a warehouse where the men fight. Tucker grabs a loose chain and beats John with it but stumbles onto a live electrical board and is electrocuted. The police escort John back to the station and assure Jeanne his actions in pursuing Tucker will be considered. As the Mapeses and the police leave the station, George's body is taken off the train, passing Rita Leland, who, surrounded by reporters, and unaware of George's death, cheerfully announces her return to California to spend time with her son.

Film Details

Also Known As
Beatsville
Release Date
Aug 1959
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
E & L Productions
Distribution Company
Allied Artists Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 12m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Film Length
6,494ft

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of the film was Beatsville. According to Hollywood Reporter news items from January and March 1959, producer Albert Zugsmith filed suit against Allied Artists protesting the use of that title as too similar to his own recently completed production, The Beat Generation, released by M-G-M. A May 1959 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that Allied Artists then registered the title The Young Set with the MPPA Title Bureau, but M-G-M protested that title as well. By June 1959 The Rebel Set was designated by Allied Artists as the new title, and no further protests were made.
       Hollywood Reporter news items add William Janssen, Vince Monroe Townsend, Jr., John Lomma, Morgan Windbeil, John Close, Frank Stanlow, Chuck Couch, Ralph Moratz, William E. Greene, Roy Harte, Red Mitchell and Victor Feldman to the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A modern source adds Jeffrey Sayre to the cast.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1959

Released in United States 1959