Rappin'


1h 32m 1985
Rappin'

Brief Synopsis

When John Rappin Hood is released from jail, he goes home to his neighborhood and finds its safety threatened by a brutal gang leader and its very existence threatened by a greedy developer.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Dance
Musical
Release Date
1985

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Synopsis

When John Rappin Hood is released from jail, he goes home to his neighborhood and finds its safety threatened by a brutal gang leader and its very existence threatened by a greedy developer. Hood gathers his group of friends to fight for their community, not with violence, but with their talent for rapping.

Crew

Richie Abanes

Song Performer

Danny Aiello Iii

Stunts

David A Arnold

Sound Editor

Wenden K Baldwin

Titles

Claudia Barry

Song Performer

Pete Beal

Electrician

Norman Beck

Carpenter

Theresa Bedekovich

Production Assistant

Efrat Ben-horin

Wardrobe Assistant

Yachoy Ben-horin

Production Assistant

Kimberley Berlin

Production Assistant

Duncan Birns

Adr Editor

Richard Bock

Sound Editor

Gary Bourgeois

Sound

Mary Bowden

Makeup Assistant

James J Bozsan

Driver

Neil Brody

Sound

Aude Bronson-howard

Costume Designer

Jim Bruwelheide

Transportation Captain

Tommy Burns

Assistant Director

Vincent Burns

Production Assistant

Ed Callahan

Sound Effects Editor

Debby Carter

Production Assistant

Lajuan Carter

Song Performer

Richard Chesky

Accounting Assistant

Ted Churchill

Steadicam Operator

Joseph Citarella

Sound

Steve Cohagan

Assistant Camera Operator

Simon Coke

Sound Editor

Jay Collins

Carpenter

Paula Connelly-skorka

Production Coordinator

Samuel R Corbin

Other

Julia E Cort

Production Assistant

Isabelle Cramer

Casting

Robert Crone

Steadicam Operator

Sheldon Crutchman

Construction Coordinator

Nurit Dekel

Wardrobe Supervisor

Stuart Deutsch

Boom Operator

Thom Downing

Audio

Dennis Duez

Production Assistant

Dan Engstrom

Sound Editor

Paula Erickson

Music Supervisor

J Eric Evans

Song

Kevin P. Faherty

Costumes

Dave Faust

Scenic Artist

David Fechtor

Foley Editor

Steven Felder

Assistant Director

Michael Ferkatch

Driver

Robert M Fischer

Key Grip

Floyd Fisher

Song

Robert Fitzgerald

Sound Effects Editor

William Fleet

Song

Angelo Flora

Carpenter

Anthony Flora

Carpenter

Beth Fornaro

Production Assistant

Barbara Frazzini

Production Assistant

Adam Friedman

Screenplay

Adam Friedman

Song

Tommy J Frimerman

Assistant Camera Operator

Marva Fucci

Sound Editor

Louis Gaetano

Driver

Joanna Gardner

Song Performer

Martin Garrigan

Property Master

Sam Gart

Assistant Camera Operator

Bert Glatstein

Editor

Eldad Globus

Production Assistant

Yoram Globus

Producer

Menahem Golan

Producer

Ken Gold

Song

Richard Golomb

Photography

Susan Golomb

Photography

Annette Louise Good

Production Assistant

Frederika Gray

Scenic Artist

Lance Guecia

Stunts

David Gurfinkel

Director Of Photography

R Halpin

Song

Kadeem Hardison

Song Performer

Pete Q Harris

Song

Jay R. Hart

Production Assistant

Kathryn Hibbs

Accountant

Sharon Hill

Casting

Todd Hill

Craft Service

Jack Hilton

Assistant Editor

Andy Horvitch

Editor

Rod Hui

Song

Jimmy James

Props

Joe Janusek

Grip

Michael Johnson

Art Assistant

Jimmy Jones

Transportation Captain

Jeannee Josefczyk

Hair

Jeannee Josefczyk

Makeup

Mary Anne Karausky

Location Assistant

Barry Kessler

Electrician

Robert Kobrin

Dialogue Coach

Robert Kobrin

Song

Joseph Kopacka

Carpenter

Jurgen Korduletsch

Song

Gary Kosko

Carpenter

Edmond Kresley

Choreographer

Eriq La Salle

Song Performer

Eriq La Salle

Song

Robert Larsen

Camera Operator

Susan Larsen

Makeup Assistant

Keith Leblanc

Song

Barry B Leirer

Assistant Editor

Blake Leyh

Foley Editor

Peter Link

Song

Michael Linn

Song

Michael Linn

Sound Editor

Michael Linn

Music

Robert Litz

Screenplay

Robert Litz

Song

Steve Loeb

Producer

Steve Loeb

Song

Simon Manses

Assistant Camera Operator

Marcus Manton

Executive Editor

Sue Maskelaris

Song

Lynn Mcafee

Photography

Marguerite Mcclure

Set Decorator

W Russell Mccormack

Lighting

J Mehl

Song

Alex Melman

Assistant Camera Operator

Bruce Alan Miller

Set Decorator

Steven R Miller

Production Designer

Warren Mills

Song Performer

Chitra F Mojtabai

Production Assistant

Edgard Mourino

Stunts

Edgard Mourino

Stunt Coordinator

Randy Murray

Song

Nancy Musser

Script Supervisor

Anne Nevin

Assistant

Christopher Novak

Carpenter

Kerry Novak

Carpenter

Leo O'brien

Song

Billy Ocean

Song

Bobby Orlando

Song

Lorrie Oshatz

Sound Editor

Barbara Palmer

Wardrobe

Rolf Pardula

Sound Mixer

Rolf Pardula

Sound

Jan Pascale

Props

Christopher Pearce

Executive Producer

Frank Perl

Camera Assistant

Melvin Plowden

Song Performer

Bob Ragona

Music

Robert Randles

Audio Consultant

Joel Renfro

Transportation Coordinator

Kurt Rimmel

Grip

Emilie Robertson

Sound Editor

Donald Robinson

Song

Jeff Rosen

Sound Editor

James N Rosenthal

Gaffer

Fred Roth

Best Boy

Daniel J Rothstein

Production

Patricia Ruben

Casting

Hari Ryatt

Sound Editor

Bonnie Sanders

Song

Ellen Schwartz

Song

Tom Scurry

Foley Editor

Stephen Seliy

Unit Manager

Stephen Seliy

Location Manager

Richard Sieg

Dolly Grip

Jeffrey Silver

Associate Producer

Jeffrey Silver

Unit Production Manager

Tom Silverman

Song

Charles Simmons

Assistant Editor

Michael Sloan

Post-Production Supervisor

Donald Smith

Carpenter

Larry K Smith

Song

Larry K Smith

Music Supervisor

Tracey Smith

Adr Editor

Carol Stavish

Scenic Artist

Janice Stief

Sound

Donald Stone

Other

Donald Stone

Dialogue Coach

David Storrs

Song

David Storrs

Song Performer

Nancy Suzich

Production Assistant

Gary Tacon

Stunts

D Terrell

Song Performer

Roy Thomas

Stunts

Maria Traversa

Assistant

Grace Valenti

Assistant Editor

Mario Van Peebles

Song

Mario Van Peebles

Song Performer

Amy Vincent

Sound Editor

William Wegert

Assistant Camera Operator

Jeff Weinberg

Driver

Dan Wetherbee

Editing

Daniel Wetherbee

Editing

Bob Whitmore

Executive Producer

Eugene Wilde

Song Performer

John G Williams

Production Assistant

D Wimbish

Song

J Wirrick

Song

Oliver Wood

Camera Operator

Tom Wright

Stunts

Tom Wright

Stunt Coordinator

Gayle Wurthner

Scenic Artist

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Dance
Musical
Release Date
1985

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m

Articles

Rappin'


In December of 1984, genre juggernaut Cannon Films announced one of its hottest new titles for the upcoming year: Rappin', sandwiched with the promise of American Ninja and the ultimately long-delayed Captain America (1990). The decision to launch a rap film made sense given that Cannon had struck box office gold earlier that year with its back-to-back productions of Breakin' and Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo, both of which sprinkled some rap into their pop and R&B soundtracks both featuring an early appearance by Ice-T. They didn't even bother giving Ice-T a character to play in Rappin', instead he essentially plays himself (under the credit Tracy Marrow, his real name) and raps the song "Killers." A former DJ and MC at the nightclub Radiotron, Ice-T was also performing with two rap groups at the time, the New York City Spinmasters and the Evil 3 M.C.'s. Though rap had been a significant music force since the late '70s with groups like Sugar Hill Gang, the art form was slow to catch on in Hollywood until the mid-'80s with films like this one, Beat Street (1984) and Krush Groove (1985), all opening within months of each other.

Future director and son of pioneering filmmaker Melvin Van Peebles, Mario Van Peebles, stars as our hero, Rappin' John Hood, who basically replays the Breakin' formula here as he spearheads a plan to save an endangered neighborhood from evil developers courtesy of a big rap contest. Yes, it's the old "let's put on a show" musical routine, this time with a hip-hop twist. Van Peebles was a new leading man at the time, having been seen most widely at that point as a dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984) and also the lead villain in Cannon's Exterminator 2 (1984).

Production for Rappin' began in Pittsburgh, PA on February 20, 1985 and wrapped on March 28, with an eclectic cast featuring All My Children's Tasia Valenza; The Edge of Night's Charles Flohe; future E.R. star Eriq La Salle; and TV favorite Kadeem Hardison, who would eventually become well known for the television series A Different World.

In May of 1985, Cannon head Menahem Golan asked Ice-T to perform a new rap song about the movie at the annual American Film Market (AFM) event. Ice-T was tasked with writing a press release explaining the meaning of terms like "word," "def," "frontin'," "B," "Chillin'" and "Maxin'." For example: "A lot of white breads still say 'right on.' Now it's simply 'Word.' Like if your friend tells you he's tired of being harassed by the police, 'The next time they come to the man, they gonna know some indignation.' 'Word' is your reply. Or say your girlfriend or boyfriend just ran off with the vacuum-cleaner salesperson. You say 'Word?' as in "No kidding?' when told of the catastrophe." In typical fashion, Cannon not only touted this film but announced a score of projects at AFM that never materialized including Dumb Dicks (which morphed into Detective School Dropouts, 1986), Godzilla vs. Cleveland, Give a Gal a Break, Who's in the Closet, Citizen Joe and most famously, Tobe Hooper's Spider-Man.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the ever contrarian Armond White was one of the few critics to laud the film in The Village Voice when it opened at the end of May. "Rappin' finds a near-perfect narrative context for a musical style that developed its own rhythmic intricacy and vocabulary through both parody and defiance of conventional pop music and 'proper' speech," he noted. "Taking the form of recitative that slides smoothly in to the self-contained meters of a song, the raps here are emblematic albeit in an entirely different league from hits by Run-DMC, Whodini and Grand Master Flash [sic]." In keeping with its prior successes, Cannon gave a big push to the film's soundtrack on vinyl and cassette, now a favorite entry in old school hip-hop collections to this day. The film now serves as a time capsule of an art form still in its early stages about to take its place on the world music stage.

By Nathaniel Thompson
Rappin'

Rappin'

In December of 1984, genre juggernaut Cannon Films announced one of its hottest new titles for the upcoming year: Rappin', sandwiched with the promise of American Ninja and the ultimately long-delayed Captain America (1990). The decision to launch a rap film made sense given that Cannon had struck box office gold earlier that year with its back-to-back productions of Breakin' and Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo, both of which sprinkled some rap into their pop and R&B soundtracks both featuring an early appearance by Ice-T. They didn't even bother giving Ice-T a character to play in Rappin', instead he essentially plays himself (under the credit Tracy Marrow, his real name) and raps the song "Killers." A former DJ and MC at the nightclub Radiotron, Ice-T was also performing with two rap groups at the time, the New York City Spinmasters and the Evil 3 M.C.'s. Though rap had been a significant music force since the late '70s with groups like Sugar Hill Gang, the art form was slow to catch on in Hollywood until the mid-'80s with films like this one, Beat Street (1984) and Krush Groove (1985), all opening within months of each other. Future director and son of pioneering filmmaker Melvin Van Peebles, Mario Van Peebles, stars as our hero, Rappin' John Hood, who basically replays the Breakin' formula here as he spearheads a plan to save an endangered neighborhood from evil developers courtesy of a big rap contest. Yes, it's the old "let's put on a show" musical routine, this time with a hip-hop twist. Van Peebles was a new leading man at the time, having been seen most widely at that point as a dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984) and also the lead villain in Cannon's Exterminator 2 (1984). Production for Rappin' began in Pittsburgh, PA on February 20, 1985 and wrapped on March 28, with an eclectic cast featuring All My Children's Tasia Valenza; The Edge of Night's Charles Flohe; future E.R. star Eriq La Salle; and TV favorite Kadeem Hardison, who would eventually become well known for the television series A Different World. In May of 1985, Cannon head Menahem Golan asked Ice-T to perform a new rap song about the movie at the annual American Film Market (AFM) event. Ice-T was tasked with writing a press release explaining the meaning of terms like "word," "def," "frontin'," "B," "Chillin'" and "Maxin'." For example: "A lot of white breads still say 'right on.' Now it's simply 'Word.' Like if your friend tells you he's tired of being harassed by the police, 'The next time they come to the man, they gonna know some indignation.' 'Word' is your reply. Or say your girlfriend or boyfriend just ran off with the vacuum-cleaner salesperson. You say 'Word?' as in "No kidding?' when told of the catastrophe." In typical fashion, Cannon not only touted this film but announced a score of projects at AFM that never materialized including Dumb Dicks (which morphed into Detective School Dropouts, 1986), Godzilla vs. Cleveland, Give a Gal a Break, Who's in the Closet, Citizen Joe and most famously, Tobe Hooper's Spider-Man. Perhaps not surprisingly, the ever contrarian Armond White was one of the few critics to laud the film in The Village Voice when it opened at the end of May. "Rappin' finds a near-perfect narrative context for a musical style that developed its own rhythmic intricacy and vocabulary through both parody and defiance of conventional pop music and 'proper' speech," he noted. "Taking the form of recitative that slides smoothly in to the self-contained meters of a song, the raps here are emblematic albeit in an entirely different league from hits by Run-DMC, Whodini and Grand Master Flash [sic]." In keeping with its prior successes, Cannon gave a big push to the film's soundtrack on vinyl and cassette, now a favorite entry in old school hip-hop collections to this day. The film now serves as a time capsule of an art form still in its early stages about to take its place on the world music stage. By Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring May 10, 1985

Began shooting March 1, 1985

Released in United States Spring May 10, 1985