A Rage in Harlem


1h 55m 1991

Brief Synopsis

Set in 1956, the story revolves around two step-brothers, their elaborate plans to get rich, and the woman the younger brother falls for.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rage in Harlem
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Abelcine; CFI Hollywood; Corbett & Keene; Danetracks Inc; Duart Film And Video; Glinwood Films Ltd; Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky Film Commission; J G Films Inc; Lumeni Productions Inc; MIRAMAX; Ohio Film Office; Palace Pictures; Saxon/Ross Film Design, Inc.; Shotmaker Company
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX; Bac Films Distribution; Concorde Films; HBO Home Video; MIRAMAX; Palace Pictures; SF Studios; Svensk Filmindustri Norway; Zeta Films
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Synopsis

Set in 1956, the story revolves around two step-brothers, their elaborate plans to get rich, and the woman the younger brother falls for.

Crew

Tabatha Adkins

Other

Joe Bachelor

Title Illustration

Greg Baxley

Stunt Player

Eric Bellamy

Assistant Auditor

Jeanne Berney

Press Contact (Miramax/La)

Elmer Bernstein

Composer

Elmer Bernstein

Music

Angela Boone

Stunt Player

Brian Boyle

Researcher

Kerry Boyle

Producer

Steven Brittingham

Stand-In

G W Brown

Dialogue Editor

Sylvi Brown

Publicity

Tony Brubaker

Stunt Player

William D Carl

Other

Carroll Cartwright

Thanks

Aleta Chappelle

Casting

Curtiss Clayton

Editor

Barry Congrove

2nd Assistant Camera

Melanie Cook

Thanks

H. H. Cooper

Set Production Assistant

Elizabeth Cooper-smokler

Extras Casting Assistant

Elonzo Coppins

Stand-In

Paul Cote

Sound Recordist

Christina Counelias

Press Contact (Miramax/Ny)

Bobby Crawford

Screenwriter

Gina Crutchfield

Other

Ajay Date

Set Production Assistant

Dane A. Davis

Supervising Sound Editor

Craig Denton

Set Production Assistant

Joann Drennan

Craft Services

Amy E Duddleston

2nd Assistant Editor

Hillard Elkins

Thanks

Crystal Emery

Office Assistant

Thom Fant

Stand-In

Scott Frank

Thanks

Michael Garland

Auditor (For Palace Productions)

Ralph Garner

Stand-In

Chris Gipple

Editorial Intern

Stephanie Givens

Stunt Player

Terry Glinwood

Executive Producer

Warren D Gray

1st Assistant Director

Tom Hammond

Foley Editor

Tom Hammond

Foley Editor

Michael Harker

Thanks

Craig Hayes

Associate Editor

Patricia Doherty Hess

Unit Manager Assistant

Eric L Hiles

Other

Chester Himes

Source Material (From Novel)

Judy Hofflund

Thanks

Larry Holt

Stunt Player

William Horberg

Executive Producer

Cendi Horton

Other

Roberta A Hunter

Other

Maureen Iser

2nd Assistant Editor

Kevin Jackson

Set Production Assistant

Pirty Lee Jackson

Stunt Player

Kini Kay

Sound Effects Editor

Christina Kumi Kimball

Other

Christina Kumi Kimball

Assistant Choreographer

Henry Kingi

Stunt Player

Henry M. Kingi Jr.

Stunt Player

Toyomichi Kurita

Director Of Photography

John Kwiatkowski

Sound Effects Editor

Steven Legler

Production Designer

Topper Lilien

Thanks

Rebecca Long

Script Supervisor

Tommy Louie

Boom Operator

Michael-lamon Lytle

Choreography Assistant

Amanda Marashinsky

Press Contact (Miramax/Ny)

Miska Matthews

Stand-In

Michael Mccormick

Production Auditor

Katy Mcguinness

Production Attorney

Perry Meigs

Apprentice Editor

Risa Morley

Assistant (To Seymour Stein)

Angela Morrison

Production Attorney

Hajna O Moss

Extras Casting

Hajna O Moss

Principal Casting Assistant

Margo Myers

Assistant Auditor

Rupert Nadeau

Thanks

Debra Nathin-solomons

Press Contact (Rogers & Cowan/Ny)

Sonja Nelson

Thanks

Stewart Nelson

Sound Effects Editor

John Nicolella

Co-Producer

Sylvia Ostendorf

2nd Assistant 2nd Camera

Andy Paley

Soundtrack Album Producer

Nik Powell

Executive Producer

Thomas A Razzano

Unit Production Manager

Thomas A Razzano

Line Producer

Von Roddy

Stunt Player

Otis Sallid

Choreography

Nile Samples

Costume Designer

Emily Schweber

Thanks

Mark S Scott

Other

Christopher Sheldon

Supervising Sound Editor

Toukie Smith

Thanks

Anna Southall

Unit Publicist

Debra Spencer

Researcher

Seymour Stein

Music Supervisor

Seymour Stein

Executive Music Producer

Andy Sydney

1st Assistant Camera

Ron Thompson

Striptease Choreography

Douglas Tirola

Office Assistant

Sarah D Todd

Still Photographer

Jock Toles

Stunt Player

John Toles-bey

Screenwriter

Todd Toon

Sound Effects Editor

Joey Tureaud

Stunt Player

Anthony Turner

Stand-In

Randy Vandegrift

Dialogue Editor

Laura Viederman

Post-Production Supervisor

Jeanpierre Vincent

French Press Contact

Kimberly Lowe Voight

Dialogue Editor

Philip Alan Waters

Camera Operator

Bob Weinstein

Executive Producer

Harvey Weinstein

Executive Producer

Forest Whitaker

Co-Producer

Brian Whitley

2nd Assistant Director

Stephen Woolley

Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
Rage in Harlem
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Abelcine; CFI Hollywood; Corbett & Keene; Danetracks Inc; Duart Film And Video; Glinwood Films Ltd; Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky Film Commission; J G Films Inc; Lumeni Productions Inc; MIRAMAX; Ohio Film Office; Palace Pictures; Saxon/Ross Film Design, Inc.; Shotmaker Company
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX; Bac Films Distribution; Concorde Films; HBO Home Video; MIRAMAX; Palace Pictures; SF Studios; Svensk Filmindustri Norway; Zeta Films
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Articles

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003


Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57.

Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California.

Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances.

His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991).

He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57. Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California. Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances. His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991). He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring May 3, 1991

Released in United States on Video November 20, 1991

Released in United States 1991

Released in United States April 29, 1991

Released in United States August 1991

Released in United States November 1991

Released in United States 1993

Shown at Deauville Film Festival August 30 - September 9, 1991.

Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 25 - May 9, 1991.

Shown at Norwegian Film Festival in Haugesund August 18-24, 1991.

Shown at Stockholm Film Festival November 15-24, 1991.

Feature directorial debut for actor-director Bill Duke.

Began shooting April 23, 1990.

Completed shooting June 24, 1990.

Earlier adaptations of Chester Himes' work include "Cotton Comes to Harlem" (USA/1970) and "Come Back, Charleston Blue" (USA/1972).

Released in United States Spring May 3, 1991

Released in United States on Video November 20, 1991

Released in United States 1991 (Shown at Deauville Film Festival August 30 - September 9, 1991.)

Released in United States 1991 (Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival April 25 - May 9, 1991.)

Released in United States April 29, 1991 (Premiered at Apollo Theater, New York City April 29, 1991.)

Released in United States 1993 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (Tribute to Miramax) June 10 ¿ July 1, 1993.)

Released in United States November 1991 (Shown at Stockholm Film Festival November 15-24, 1991.)

Released in United States August 1991 (Shown at Norwegian Film Festival in Haugesund August 18-24, 1991.)