Pursued


1h 41m 1947

Film Details

Genre
Mystery
Western
Release Date
Mar 2, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
United States Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

In the territory of New Mexico at the turn of the twentieth century, Jeb Rand hides from his pursuers in an abandoned house. He tells Thor Callum, who has brought him food and water, that while hiding there, he has recalled events that may explain what has gone wrong with his life: As a child of four, Jeb is rescued from the same house by Ma Callum, who takes him and her own children, Thor, who is three, and Adam, who is the same age as Jeb, away from the area. As he grows, Jeb is troubled by indistinct and frightening memories of the events before Ma took him in. One day, when Jeb is eleven, his horse is shot out from under him. Jeb believes that Adam is responsible, and the two boys fight about it. When Ma learns what happened, she confronts Grant Callum, her brother-in-law, who, unknown to Jeb is the man who shot his horse. Although Grant has vowed to avenge his brother's murder, he eventually agrees to return to Santa Fe, convinced that Jeb will turn Ma against him by his very nature. When Ma returns home, she advises Jeb to forget the past and love his new family, but despite her wishes, his memories continue to haunt him. Several years later, when the territory declares war against Spain, Grant tries to coerce Jeb into joining the army, in hopes that he will be killed. Later, when a toss of the coin determines that Jeb, not Adam, will fight, Jeb does sign up but returns a hero. Grant then turns Adam against Jeb. Angered by Jeb's lack of interest in the farm, Adam offers to buy him out, but another toss of the coin sends Jeb away with nothing. When Jeb promises Thor that he will return for her, Adam insists that he will never let her marry Jeb. Thor makes it clear that she will marry Jeb without his blessing, however, and Adam rides after Jeb, intending to kill him. Instead, Jeb kills Adam in self-defense but, despite the findings of a jury, Ma and Thor believe he is guilty of murder. Jeb then becomes a partner in Jake Dingle's saloon. At a dance, which Thor attends with the mild-mannered Prentice, Jeb forces her to dance with him. Grant witnesses this and pressures Prentice to avenge the imagined insult to Thor. In the ensuing gunfight, Prentice is killed. Jeb is again acquitted and begins to court Thor. Although she now hates Jeb, Thor agrees to marry him, intending to kill him on their wedding night. She cannot go through with her plans, however, and realizes that she still loves Jeb. Summoned by Grant, the Callums descend on Jeb and Thor's house. After arranging to meet Thor at the old house, Jeb eludes his pursuers. Soon after Jeb finishes his story, the Callums and Ma arrive at his hideout and a shootout ensues. It was a similar fight that killed Jeb's entire family, and he now remembers Grant forcing Ma to "look at your Rand," in punishment for her affair with his father. Outnumbered, Jeb surrenders. Before Grant can hang Jeb, however, Ma shoots him and apologizes to Jeb for believing that they could forget the past. The way is now cleared for Jeb and Thor to live together in peace.

Film Details

Genre
Mystery
Western
Release Date
Mar 2, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
United States Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

Teresa Wright (1918-2005)


Teresa Wright, a talented, Oscar&-winning leading lady of the '40s, and in later life, a versatile character player, died on March 6 at a New Haven, Connecticut hospital of a heart attack. She was 86.

She was born Muriel Teresa Wright in New York City on October 27, 1918. She showed a keen interest in acting in grade school, and by the time she was 19, she made her Broadway debut in Thorton Wilder's Our Town (1938); the following year she scored a hit as Mary, the weeping ingénue in Life with Father (1939). The word was out that New York had a superb young acting talent on hand, and Samuel Goldwyn soon brought her to Hollywood for William Wyler's adaptation of Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes (1941). She scored an Oscar® nomination for her film debut as Regina Giddens' (Bette Davis), honorable daughter, Alexandria.

She maintained her amazing momentum by scoring two Oscar® nominations the following year for her next two films: as Carol Miniver in Wyler's Mrs. Miniver (Best Supporting Actress Category), and as Lou Gehrig's (Gary Cooper) faithful wife Ellie in Pride of the Yankees (Best Actress Category), and won the Oscar for Miniver. Yet for most fans of Wright's work, her finest hour remains her perfectly modulated performance as young Charlie in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece, Shadow of a Doubt (1943). Wright's performance as the self-effacing, impressionable young niece who gradually realizes that her beloved uncle (Joseph Cotton) may have murdered several widows is effective since Wright's air of observation, subtly turns from idol gazing, to a watchful air of caution as the facts slowly being to unravel. 60 years on, fans of Hitchcock still acclaim Wright's performance as an integral part of the film's classic status.

She proved her talents in comedy with the delightful Casanova Brown (1944), but then saw her schedule slow down due to domesticity. After she married screenwriter Niven Busch in 1942, she gave birth to son, Niven Jr., in 1944, and took two years off to look after her family. She soon returned to film with another Wyler project, the Oscar®-winning, post war drama, The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), playing Fredric March's level-headed daughter, Peggy, she again took some time off after giving birth to her daughter, Mary in 1947. On her second attempt to return to the big screen, Wright found her popularity on the wane. Her wholesome image was in sharp contrast of the tougher, more modern women in post-war Hollywood, and her stubborn refusal to pose for any swimsuit or cheesecake photos to alter her image led to her release from Sam Goldwyn's contract.

As a freelance actress, Wright still found some good roles, notably as a young widow in the thriller scripted by her husband, in The Capture; and as a faithful fiancée trying to help Marlin Brandon deal with his amputation in Stanley Kramer's The Men (both 1950). Yet within a few years, she was playing middle-aged mothers in film like The Actress (1953), and The Track of the Cat (1954), even though she was still in her early '30s. By the mid-50s she found work in live television, where she could apply her stage training, in a number of acclaimed shows: Playhouse 90, General Electric Theater, Four Star Playhouse, and The United States Steel Hour.

She took a break from acting when she married her second husband, the playwright Robert Anderson in 1959, (she had divorced her first husband, Busch, in 1952) and was out of the public eye for several decades, save for an isolated theater appearance. When she did return, it was intermittent, but she was always worth watching. In James Ivory's Roseland (1977), a portrait of the New York dancehall; she was poignant as a talkative widow obsessed with her late husband; and as an enigmatic old actress in Somewhere in Time, she nearly stole the picture from leads, Christopher Reeve and Jayne Seymour. She was still active in the '90s, appearing a few hit shows: Murder, She Wrote, Picket Fences; and a final film role in John Grisham's The Rainmaker (1997). She is survived by her son, Niven; daughter, Mary; and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Teresa Wright (1918-2005)

Teresa Wright (1918-2005)

Teresa Wright, a talented, Oscar&-winning leading lady of the '40s, and in later life, a versatile character player, died on March 6 at a New Haven, Connecticut hospital of a heart attack. She was 86. She was born Muriel Teresa Wright in New York City on October 27, 1918. She showed a keen interest in acting in grade school, and by the time she was 19, she made her Broadway debut in Thorton Wilder's Our Town (1938); the following year she scored a hit as Mary, the weeping ingénue in Life with Father (1939). The word was out that New York had a superb young acting talent on hand, and Samuel Goldwyn soon brought her to Hollywood for William Wyler's adaptation of Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes (1941). She scored an Oscar® nomination for her film debut as Regina Giddens' (Bette Davis), honorable daughter, Alexandria. She maintained her amazing momentum by scoring two Oscar® nominations the following year for her next two films: as Carol Miniver in Wyler's Mrs. Miniver (Best Supporting Actress Category), and as Lou Gehrig's (Gary Cooper) faithful wife Ellie in Pride of the Yankees (Best Actress Category), and won the Oscar for Miniver. Yet for most fans of Wright's work, her finest hour remains her perfectly modulated performance as young Charlie in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece, Shadow of a Doubt (1943). Wright's performance as the self-effacing, impressionable young niece who gradually realizes that her beloved uncle (Joseph Cotton) may have murdered several widows is effective since Wright's air of observation, subtly turns from idol gazing, to a watchful air of caution as the facts slowly being to unravel. 60 years on, fans of Hitchcock still acclaim Wright's performance as an integral part of the film's classic status. She proved her talents in comedy with the delightful Casanova Brown (1944), but then saw her schedule slow down due to domesticity. After she married screenwriter Niven Busch in 1942, she gave birth to son, Niven Jr., in 1944, and took two years off to look after her family. She soon returned to film with another Wyler project, the Oscar®-winning, post war drama, The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), playing Fredric March's level-headed daughter, Peggy, she again took some time off after giving birth to her daughter, Mary in 1947. On her second attempt to return to the big screen, Wright found her popularity on the wane. Her wholesome image was in sharp contrast of the tougher, more modern women in post-war Hollywood, and her stubborn refusal to pose for any swimsuit or cheesecake photos to alter her image led to her release from Sam Goldwyn's contract. As a freelance actress, Wright still found some good roles, notably as a young widow in the thriller scripted by her husband, in The Capture; and as a faithful fiancée trying to help Marlin Brandon deal with his amputation in Stanley Kramer's The Men (both 1950). Yet within a few years, she was playing middle-aged mothers in film like The Actress (1953), and The Track of the Cat (1954), even though she was still in her early '30s. By the mid-50s she found work in live television, where she could apply her stage training, in a number of acclaimed shows: Playhouse 90, General Electric Theater, Four Star Playhouse, and The United States Steel Hour. She took a break from acting when she married her second husband, the playwright Robert Anderson in 1959, (she had divorced her first husband, Busch, in 1952) and was out of the public eye for several decades, save for an isolated theater appearance. When she did return, it was intermittent, but she was always worth watching. In James Ivory's Roseland (1977), a portrait of the New York dancehall; she was poignant as a talkative widow obsessed with her late husband; and as an enigmatic old actress in Somewhere in Time, she nearly stole the picture from leads, Christopher Reeve and Jayne Seymour. She was still active in the '90s, appearing a few hit shows: Murder, She Wrote, Picket Fences; and a final film role in John Grisham's The Rainmaker (1997). She is survived by her son, Niven; daughter, Mary; and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to a studio press release, Fred MacMurray was originally to star in this film. An article in Look reports that screenwriter Niven Busch wrote Pursued as a vehicle for his wife, actress Teresa Wright. The film marked the first time that the couple worked together. The film crew spent four weeks on location near Gallup, NM. The article adds that night scenes were shot with infrared film. Contemporary critics refer to the picture as a "Film Noir" Western or the first "psychological" Western.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1990

Released in United States March 1976

Released in United States Spring March 2, 1947

Shown at Telluride Film Festival August 31-September 3, 1990.

Released in United States 1990 (Shown at Telluride Film Festival August 31-September 3, 1990.)

Released in United States March 1976 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (The 48-Hour Cowboy Movie Marathon) March 18-31, 1976.)

Released in United States Spring March 2, 1947