The Pickle


1h 43m 1993

Brief Synopsis

A filmmaker's ridiculous, yet crowd-pleasing project makes a fortune at the box-office, but his personal life is less than perfect.

Film Details

Also Known As
Pickle
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
New York City, New York, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Synopsis

A filmmaker's ridiculous, yet crowd-pleasing project makes a fortune at the box-office, but his personal life is less than perfect.

Crew

Danny Aiello Iii

Stunt Coordinator

Joseph S Alfieri

Construction Coordinator

Gary Alper

Sound Mixer

Christopher Amy

Props Assistant

David Anderberg

Grip

Mark Bachman

Scenic Artist

Diane Bandolas

Production Accountant

Pat Beitz

Sound Editor

John Berger

Art Director

James D. Bissell

Production Designer

Jussi Bjorling

Song Performer

Robert Blackwell

Song

Julie A. Bloom

Assistant Director

Arthur Blum

Dolly Grip

Carlyn Bochicchio

Assistant Production Coordinator

Robert H Branham

Production

Tom Briggs

Transportation Captain

Henry Bronchtein

Assistant Director

Dave Bryden

Color Timer

Christopher Burian-mohr

Art Director

Michael J Burke

Lighting Technician

Mark Burnett

Video Playback

Daniel Burns

Production Assistant

William A Campbell

Wardrobe Supervisor

Patrick Capone

Assistant Camera Operator

Jane Carpenter-wilson

Sound Editor

Andrew Casey

Assistant Camera Operator

Mike Chambers

Visual Effects

Linda R Chen

Photography

Mia Choi

Casting Associate

Dorree Cooper

Set Decorator

Annemarie Costello

Production Associate

Ernest Depew

Construction Coordinator

Ervin Drake

Song

Mitch Dubin

Camera Operator

Vernon Duke

Song

Patricia Eiben

Wardrobe

Edward C Eyth

Production

Cory Faucher

Visual Effects

Dan Fisher

Song

Brian Fitzsimons

Grip

Jan Foster

Location Manager

Carrie Frazier

Casting

Kelly Kathleen Fritz

Production Assistant

Mark Gerstein

Apprentice

Shani Ginsberg

Casting

David Glazer

Property Master

Ron Goodman

Other

Moonstar Greene

Apprentice

Richard Guinness

Dolly Grip

Dave Hallinan

Assistant Director

Brian Hamill

Photography

Eero Hautanen

Props

James Hegedus

Art Director

Michael Herbick

Rerecording

Irene Higginbotham

Song

Richard Holston

Transportation Co-Captain

Scott Hornbacher

Assistant Location Manager

Craig Hosking

Helicopter Pilot

Michael Hyde

Transportation Captain

Nils Johnson

Video Playback

Randy Johnson

Boom Operator

Dale Johnston

Sound Editor

Jaynne Keyes

Special Thanks To

Stella S Kim

Dga Trainee

Steve Kirshoff

Special Effects

Lisa Grace Kolasa

Assistant

Beth Kushnick

Set Decorator

Brett Laumann

Lighting

Michel Legrand

Music

Robert J Litt

Rerecording

Carlane Passman Little

Costumes

George L. Little

Costumes

Little Richard

Song Performer

John B Lowry

Key Grip

William F. Luehm

Transportation Co-Captain

Vernon Lynch

Song

Lillian O Macneil

Script Supervisor

Bill Manger

Sound Editor

John Marascalco

Song

Lori Martino

Assistant Sound Editor

Steve Mathis

Lighting Technician

Paul Mazursky

Screenplay

Paul Mazursky

Producer

Patrick Mccormick

Unit Production Manager

Patrick Mccormick

Executive Producer

Lynn Mcgill

Craft Service

Paula K Mckee

Assistant Editor

Richard A Mention

Assistant Camera Operator

Ferd Metz

Stage Manager

Anastas Michos

Steadicam Operator

Harry Moreau

Animation Supervisor

Matthew Morrissey

Assistant Camera Operator

Michelle Morrissey

Production Coordinator

Charles Murphy

Song

Fred Murphy

Director Of Photography

Eric Myers

Assistant Editor

Valli O'reilly

Makeup

Richard L Oswald

Sound Editor

Paisley C Pappe

Art Department Coordinator

Stuart H Pappe

Coproducer

Stuart H Pappe

Editor

Cynthia J Parker

Craft Service

Jane Paul

Assistant Director

Mark Peltzer

Property Master

Frank Perl

Camera Operator

Eric Peterson

Camera

Giacomo Puccini

Song

Aaron F. Quarles

Hair Stylist

Juan Ros

Production Assistant

Gina Salerno

Assistant

Steve Sass

Camera Operator

Van Scarboro

Video Assist/Playback

Norman Schwartz

Adr Supervisor

William Shourt

Other

James W Sircy

Props

Steve Smith

Key Grip

Todd Micah Solomon

Boom Operator

Michele Sommer

Props Assistant

John M Stacy

Sound Editor

David Stump

Director Of Photography

John Swallow

Visual Effects Supervisor

Jonathan Tessler

Props Assistant

Dan Thomas

Sound Editor

Peter A Tullo

Props Assistant

Elliot Tyson

Rerecording

Randy Unger

Location Manager

Patricia A Vanover

Assistant Camera Operator

Francisca Vega-buck

Wardrobe Supervisor

Lenny Vullo

Unit Production Manager

Dan Wallin

Music

James Walsh

Lighting

Jim Webb

Sound Mixer

Bill Weinman

Assistant Sound Editor

Rosemarie Wheeler

Adr Editor

Ted Whitfield

Music Editor

David A. Whittaker

Sound Editor

Gigi Williams

Makeup Artist

Albert Wolsky

Costume Designer

Michael L Wood

Special Effects Coordinator

Joe Yanuzzi

Editor

Joy Zapata

Hair Stylist

Ron Zarilla

Assistant Camera Operator

Debbie Zoller

Makeup

Film Details

Also Known As
Pickle
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
New York City, New York, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Articles

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole
Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1999

Released in United States on Video October 6, 1993

Released in United States Spring April 30, 1993

Shown at Avignon/New York Film Festival in New York City (French Institute) April 22 - May 2, 1999.

Began shooting September 23, 1991.

Completed shooting December 3, 1991.

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at Avignon/New York Film Festival in New York City (French Institute) April 22 - May 2, 1999.)

Released in United States Spring April 30, 1993

Released in United States on Video October 6, 1993