Pick-Up


1h 16m 1933

Film Details

Also Known As
Viña Delmar's Pick-Up
Release Date
Mar 24, 1933
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Pick-up" by Viña Delmar in Red Book Magazine (Nov 1928).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

After "Baby Face" Mary married Jim Richards, she became unwillingly involved in his "badger" game and was convicted and sent to prison. She is released after two years and vows that she is through with Jim, although he warns her not to desert him. With only five dollars in her pocket, Mary is destitute and takes refuge in a cab one night to escape a storm. Cabby Harry Glynn mistakes her for a streetwalker and orders her out, but later takes pity on her and drives her to his home. Mary, using the name Molly, proves her trustworthiness, and Harry gets her a job at the cab company. They fall in love, and Mary urges Harry to seek a better position in life by opening his own garage. After Mary is propositioned by her boss, she and Harry quit and he uses his savings to buy a garage. When Harry proposes to Mary, she confesses that she is not free but does not reveal her past, afraid that Harry will lose interest if he knows her true identity. Harry's garage prospers and they move to an expensive neighborhood where Harry meets socialite Muriel Stevens, who invites him to a costume party. Muriel lavishes attention on Harry and pushes Mary aside, and Harry responds amorously. Mary entreats Muriel not to interfere, and Muriel becomes more interested in Harry when she discovers they are not married. Mary consults a lawyer, who tells her there is a legal clause in the marriage contract that entitles her to an annulment if her husband has been in jail for more than two years. In two weeks she receives the annulment and rushes home, but Harry informs her he is leaving her for Muriel. Unfortunately, Muriel laughs at his marriage proposal, and he realizes that Muriel is a "pick-up," a cheap date, while Mary is the "real thing." In the meantime, Jim has killed a guard and escaped from prison and appears at Mary's home. In a rage, he threatens to kill Harry, so to save Harry, Mary professes her everlasting love for Jim and accompanies him to his hideout. Jim finds the annulment papers and realizes he has been duped, but she locks him in a room and calls the police. Later, Harry sells all his property to hire the best lawyer to free Mary, who was arrested as an accomplice to Jim's escape. After Jim perjures himself during the trial and unwittingly tries to kill Harry with an unloaded gun, Mary's innocence is proven. Outside the courthouse, Harry picks up Mary in his cab and they begin anew.

Film Details

Also Known As
Viña Delmar's Pick-Up
Release Date
Mar 24, 1933
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "Pick-up" by Viña Delmar in Red Book Magazine (Nov 1928).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The opening title reads "Viña Delmar's Pick-Up." Daniel N. Rubin is listed as a screenwriter with S. K. Lauren and Agnes Brand Leahy on an early draft of the script. His contribution to the final film is undetermined. Paramount script files at the AMPAS library and news items in Hollywood Reporter indicate that Gary Cooper was considered for the role of "Harry." A Hollywood Reporter news item also notes that in mid-Dec, actor George Raft was reassigned to The Story of Temple Drake (see below), however, left that production due to a salary dispute. According to copyright records, Hollywood cab driver James Pancoast appears in a minor role in the film. Copyright records also note that B. P. Schulberg's office appears in the film as the lawyer's office.