Nebraska


1h 54m 2013
Nebraska

Brief Synopsis

After receiving a sweepstakes letter in the mail, a cantankerous old alcoholic thinks he's struck it rich and wrangles his son into taking a road trip across the heartland of America to claim the fortune.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
2013
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Lincoln, Nebraska, USA; Laurel, Montana, USA; Buffalo, Wyoming, USA; Billings, Montana, USA; Norfolk, Nebraska, USA; Rapid City, South Dakota, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Synopsis

After receiving a sweepstakes letter in the mail, a cantankerous old alcoholic thinks he's struck it rich and wrangles his son into taking a road trip across the heartland of America to claim the fortune.

Crew

Stephen Abariotes

Production Consultant

Mario Aguirre

Craft Service

Andy Anderson

Costumer

Ara Anderson

Music

Bryan Arenas

Consultant

Scott August

Assistant Director

David Bach

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Deidre Backs

Coordinator

Brian Bautista

Visual Effects

Brian Bautista

Apprentice Editor

Jody Beaudin

Accounting Assistant

Emily Bensinger

Production Assistant

Albert Berger

Producer

Greg Berger

Foreman

Kimberly K. Bilstein

Accounting Clerk

Jeannine Bourdaghs

Costume Supervisor

Gail Briant

Scenic Artist

Dennis Buffum

Grip

Nate Buffum

Grip

Rob Burger

Music

Robert Burger

Song

Robert Burger

Song Performer

Debra Burgess

Payroll Accountant

Cathy Carfagna

Song Performer

Nathan Carlson

Graphic Artist

Gregory S. Carr

Assistant Director

Wendy Chuck

Costume Designer

Ruth Ciemnoczolowski

Seamstress Supervisor

Marisa Clayton

Camera

Wes Clowers

Construction Coordinator

Jay Collins

Sound

Alejandro Cordero

Craft Service

Kevin Cowan

Electrician

Scott Curtis

Foley Mixer

Patrick Cyccone Jr.

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Robert Dach

Coordinator

Lonny Danler

Camera

Anthony Davis

Projectionist

Chad R Davis

On-Set Dresser

Lora D. Davis

On-Set Dresser

Mac Davis

Song

Marcello De Francisci

Song

Louise Decordoba

Production Accountant

Lawson Deming

Visual Effects Supervisor

Terry Devine-king

Song

John Dexter

Song

Scott Dougherty

Visual Effects

Adam Drake

Song

Alexis Dvorak

Production Assistant

Gary Edelman

Transportation Coordinator

Charles Ehrlinger

Rigging Grip

Mindy L Elliott

Assistant Editor

Jesse Emerson

Music

Lee Emerson

Song

Danny Epper

Stunts

Geoffrey Ernst

Electrician

Rod Farley

Grip

Todd Feaser

Assistant Location Manager

Sherry Ferris

Coordinator

Richard Ford

Music Producer

Wes Ford

Production Secretary

Robin Fredriksz

Makeup

Jesse Friedman

Song Performer

Jesse Friedman

Song

Jonathan Fuh

Boom Operator

Frank Gaeta

Sound Designer

Jose Antonio Garcia

Sound Mixer

Ray Garcia

Grip

Hilton Garett

Grip

Anne Ryan Gauer

Assistant Location Manager

Shannon Gauer

Production Assistant

Ben Goldberg

Music

Mark Governor

Song

Mark Governor

Song Performer

Wendy Guerrero

Assistant

Mark Hanks

On-Set Dresser

Mads Hansen

Unit Production Manager

Tom Hardisty

Music

Topher Harless

Casting Assistant

Nicholas Hasson

Colorist

Tin Hat

Song Performer

Elias Heartnet

Production Assistant

Fontaine Beauchamp Hebb

Set Decorator

Jacob Heger

Production Assistant

Phil Helman

Transportation Captain

Jimmy Helms

Production Assistant

Erik Hill

Grip

Chuck Hosack

Stunts

Jake Hossfeld

Electrician

Dana Hunt

Song

Robert Hyman

Song

Joe Iemola

Sound Editor

John Jackson

Casting

Cory Jamieson

Visual Effects Producer

Jude Jansen

Researcher

Rudy Jansen

Production Assistant

Phil Johnston

Other

Philip Joncas

Assistant Production Coordinator

Billy Jones

Scenic Artist

Mason Kenton

Production Assistant

Carla Kihlstedt

Song Performer

Carla Kihlstedt

Music

Skip Kimball

Colorist

Megan Klimkos

Costumer

Bob Knollenberg

Coordinator

Chelsea Krant

Assistant

Eric Ladd

Titles

Josh Land

Post-Production Assistant

Ladd Lanford

Project Manager

John Latenser V

Location Manager

Cyndi Lauper

Song

Kendra Liedle

Assistant Location Manager

Elle Lien

Art Department

David Lingenfelser

Visual Effects Supervisor

Luis Brito Lopez

Song

David Luckenbach

Steadicam Operator

Dawn Lunsford

Foley Artist

Joey Lynch

On-Set Dresser

Jason Mahoney

Medic

Douglas Mankoff

Executive Producer

Jared Marshack

Sound Mixer

Mato

Film Lab

Greta Methot

Production Assistant

Thomas Miller

Assistant Property Master

Martin Moody

Photography

Mike Moore

Music

Anton Muetz

Craft Service

Anna Musso

Assistant

Kerry Muzzey

Song Performer

Kerry Muzzey

Song

Bob Nelson

Screenplay

Sean O'connor

Compositor

Kevin O'leary

Medic

Carrick O'quinn

Stunts

Mark Orton

Music

Mark Orton

Song Performer

Mark Orton

Song

Megan Orton

Music

Megan Orton

Song Performer

Ahna K Packard

Set Designer

Jim Palmer

Stunts

Bill Parker

Compositor

George Parra

Executive Producer

George Parra

Assistant Director

Hope M. Parrish

Property Master

Jim Passon

Film Lab

Alexander Payne

Other

David Pearlberg

Dolly Grip

Larry Wayne Penny

Song Performer

Larry Wayne Penny

Song

Dave Peverett

Song

Bryan Pezzone

Music

Dan Poole

Transportation Captain

Radan Popovic

Cinematographer

Jeff Porter

Photography

Claude Putnam

Song

Buck Quigley

Song

Yesi Ramirez

Casting Associate

Thomas W Rebber

Coordinator

Rick Reynolds

Post-Production Supervisor

Jessica Ripka

Art Department Coordinator

Sherry Ristow

Song Performer

Margaret Robbs

Set Costumer

Rebecca Robertson

Script Supervisor

Gregory S. Rohde

On-Set Dresser

Craig Rondell

Stunts

Erik Rondell

Stunt Coordinator

John Ross

Compositor

Peter Rotter

Music Contractor

Nikola Rudela

Craft Service

Mark Sahagun

Camera

Benito Sanchez

Production Assistant

Rafael Sanchez

Chief Lighting Technician

Waldo Sanchez

Hair

Jason Scheff

Song

Anthony Schmidt

Stunts

Paula Schmitt

Compositor

Billy Scoles

Transportation Captain

Tari Segal

Camera Operator

Spike Simms

Rigging Electrician

Tim Sitarz

Stunts

Dave Eric Smith

Song

Melanie Smith

Hair Stylist

Tom Snider

Song

Tom Snider

Song Performer

Ember Soberman

Painter

Jason Speidel

Coordinator

Scott Sprague

Chief Lighting Technician

Alicia M Stevenson

Foley Artist

George Strait

Song Performer

Roger Stuckwisch

Song Performer

Neil Tabatznik

Executive Producer

Jim Taylor

Other

Kevin Tent

Editor

Julie Thompson

Executive Producer

George Tipton

Song

Sonia Torres

Production Assistant

Lindsay Trapnell

Casting Assistant

Los Embajadores Vallenatos

Song Performer

Jennifer Van Horn

Coordinator

Film Details

MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
2013
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Lincoln, Nebraska, USA; Laurel, Montana, USA; Buffalo, Wyoming, USA; Billings, Montana, USA; Norfolk, Nebraska, USA; Rapid City, South Dakota, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Articles

Nebraska (2013)


Nebraska (2013) is a bittersweet B&W comedy in which a lonely son (Will Forte) takes his ailing dad (Bruce Dern) on a road trip from Billings, Montana to Lincoln, Nebraska. It is another of director Alexander Payne’s deadpan Midwestern comedies (Election [1999], About Schmidt [2002], Sideways [2004], The Descendants [2011]) but the first for which he did not write the script, which was authored by first-timer Bob Nelson.

Nelson was an out-of-work comedian in his 50s who wrote a spec script about his hard-drinking Nebraskan father. It made the rounds and was eventually optioned by Ron Yerxa and Albert Berger, who had produced Election. According to The Hollywood Reporter they sent it to Payne: “He's from Nebraska; we thought maybe he'd know of a director he could mentor. Instead, Payne said, ‘How about me?’". Payne was shown the screenplay while he was preparing Sideways, and he did not want to follow that road trip movie with yet another, and so he put it aside until after completing The Descendants. Nebraska finally starting shooting in October 2012 and premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2013.

The story begins in Billings with Woody Grant (Dern) walking down the side of a highway, intent on making it to Lincoln, Nebraska. He received a letter in the mail from there that says he won a million dollars, though it is clear to his wife Kate (June Squibb) and his sons David (Forte) and Ross (Bob Odenkirk) that it is just false advertising to encourage magazine subscriptions. But no one can convince the impossibly stubborn Woody otherwise. David, whose girlfriend has just broken up with him, wants to get out of town and sees a road trip as a way to clear his head and get some bonding time with his obstreperous and closed-off dad.

Payne originally envisioned Bruce Dern in the part, but Paramount encouraged him to seek a bigger star. But after failing to lure Gene Hackman out of retirement, they returned to Dern, who was eager to take center stage after making a career out of eccentrically charismatic supporting parts. Dern makes the most of his opportunity, shredding his voice into an accusatory death rattle as he shambles through the towns of his youth, his shock of white hair, overgrown stubble and too-loose flannel shirts making him look like a bum on his final bender.

Paramount was also dead set against releasing the film in black-and-white, and according to producer Albert Berger, were threatening to cut the budget “from $17 million down to under five.” But then The Descendants went on to earn $177 million worldwide, and the budget was restored to “13 million and change.” DP Phendon Papamichael’s cinematography is starkly reminiscent of Robert Frank’s road trip photo book The Americans, seeking poetry in road signs, gas stations, used car lots and the broken-down grandeur of Woody’s sunken profile.

One of the backdrops of the story is the aftershocks of the Great Recession and how it hollowed out the economy of these already-declining small towns. So everybody wants to believe, like Woody does, that the million dollars is real – that it is actually possible to see that amount of money in the world. Some handle it with generosity, others with greed and comic attempts at slapstick violence (Payne is a vocal admirer of silent comedy). And it should be noted that Jane Squibb is an uproarious howitzer of foul insults throughout – but no better when she aims fire at Woody’s family for taking advantage of his generosity and gullibility throughout his life. He is a deeply flawed man, but at least his flaws stem from a belief in others. So when David stage manages a literal ride off into the sunset for his senescent dad, it’s a temporary triumph, but a triumph all the same.

Nebraska (2013)

Nebraska (2013)

Nebraska (2013) is a bittersweet B&W comedy in which a lonely son (Will Forte) takes his ailing dad (Bruce Dern) on a road trip from Billings, Montana to Lincoln, Nebraska. It is another of director Alexander Payne’s deadpan Midwestern comedies (Election [1999], About Schmidt [2002], Sideways [2004], The Descendants [2011]) but the first for which he did not write the script, which was authored by first-timer Bob Nelson.Nelson was an out-of-work comedian in his 50s who wrote a spec script about his hard-drinking Nebraskan father. It made the rounds and was eventually optioned by Ron Yerxa and Albert Berger, who had produced Election. According to The Hollywood Reporter they sent it to Payne: “He's from Nebraska; we thought maybe he'd know of a director he could mentor. Instead, Payne said, ‘How about me?’". Payne was shown the screenplay while he was preparing Sideways, and he did not want to follow that road trip movie with yet another, and so he put it aside until after completing The Descendants. Nebraska finally starting shooting in October 2012 and premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2013.The story begins in Billings with Woody Grant (Dern) walking down the side of a highway, intent on making it to Lincoln, Nebraska. He received a letter in the mail from there that says he won a million dollars, though it is clear to his wife Kate (June Squibb) and his sons David (Forte) and Ross (Bob Odenkirk) that it is just false advertising to encourage magazine subscriptions. But no one can convince the impossibly stubborn Woody otherwise. David, whose girlfriend has just broken up with him, wants to get out of town and sees a road trip as a way to clear his head and get some bonding time with his obstreperous and closed-off dad.Payne originally envisioned Bruce Dern in the part, but Paramount encouraged him to seek a bigger star. But after failing to lure Gene Hackman out of retirement, they returned to Dern, who was eager to take center stage after making a career out of eccentrically charismatic supporting parts. Dern makes the most of his opportunity, shredding his voice into an accusatory death rattle as he shambles through the towns of his youth, his shock of white hair, overgrown stubble and too-loose flannel shirts making him look like a bum on his final bender.Paramount was also dead set against releasing the film in black-and-white, and according to producer Albert Berger, were threatening to cut the budget “from $17 million down to under five.” But then The Descendants went on to earn $177 million worldwide, and the budget was restored to “13 million and change.” DP Phendon Papamichael’s cinematography is starkly reminiscent of Robert Frank’s road trip photo book The Americans, seeking poetry in road signs, gas stations, used car lots and the broken-down grandeur of Woody’s sunken profile.One of the backdrops of the story is the aftershocks of the Great Recession and how it hollowed out the economy of these already-declining small towns. So everybody wants to believe, like Woody does, that the million dollars is real – that it is actually possible to see that amount of money in the world. Some handle it with generosity, others with greed and comic attempts at slapstick violence (Payne is a vocal admirer of silent comedy). And it should be noted that Jane Squibb is an uproarious howitzer of foul insults throughout – but no better when she aims fire at Woody’s family for taking advantage of his generosity and gullibility throughout his life. He is a deeply flawed man, but at least his flaws stem from a belief in others. So when David stage manages a literal ride off into the sunset for his senescent dad, it’s a temporary triumph, but a triumph all the same.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Limited Release in United States November 15, 2013

Released in United States on Video February 25, 2014

Released in United States 2013

Casey Affleck was previously mentioned to star.

Robert Forster was previously mentioned to star.

Project previously set up at Focus Features.

Gene Hackman, Robert Duvall and Jack Nicholson were rumored to be on the short-list to star.

Released in United States 2013 (Official Selection)

Limited Release in United States November 15, 2013

Released in United States on Video February 25, 2014

Released in United States 2013 (Special Presentation)

Released in United States 2013 (Centerpiece Films)

Released in United States 2013 (Galas & Tributes)

Released in United States 2013 (Show)

Project was included on the 2005 Black List.

Project will be shot in black-and-white.