Perfect Strangers


1h 28m 1950
Perfect Strangers

Brief Synopsis

A divorcee finds love with a married man while they both sit on a jury.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Release Date
Mar 24, 1950
Premiere Information
New York opening: 10 Mar 1950
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Ladies and Gentlemen by Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht (New York, 17 Oct 1939), as produced by Gilbert Miller, which was based on the play Twelve in a Box by Laszlo Bus-Fekete (production undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 28m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,923ft

Synopsis

Among the members of a jury selected at random to sit for the Los Angeles murder trial of Ernest Craig are Terry Scott, who is separated from her husband; David Campbell, married with two children; Lena Fassler, pregnant with her sixth child; Mrs. Isobel Bradford, a snobby society woman; and womanizer Robert Fisher, who is attracted to Terry. After the jury is sworn in, Judge Byron sequesters the jury. At dinner, despite warnings not to discuss the case among themselves, most jurors express their belief that Craig murdered his wife when she refused to give him a divorce so he could marry his secretary, Eileen Marcher. Terry argues for keeping an open mind until the defendant is proven guilty. After the first day in court, the tired jurors return to their hotel suite. During a heated discussion of the case, Terry and David sneak out to the balcony, but are interrupted by Isobel and Fisher. When David and Isobel agree that Craig's desertion of his wife might indicate his guilt, Terry accuses them of being smug and opinionated. Tempers flare when jurors are forced to share crowded bedrooms and bathrooms. Later, when Fisher speaks at length about Terry's attractiveness, David retreats to the balcony. He encounters Terry, who has also chosen to be alone. After Terry apologizes for her earlier outburst, they chat about what they would be doing if they were at home. David describes his family routine, while Terry talks about her lonely life since separating from her husband. Their intimate discussion is followed by a passionate kiss. As the trial continues, David arranges with the bailiff to take a private walk on the hotel roof with Terry, and they profess their love for each other. The following day in court, the district attorney reads a love letter from Craig to Eileen, which greatly upsets Terry. During the next break, she tells David that they should stop seeing each other. The evidence against Craig mounts when his sister-in-law reports hearing him quarrel with his wife before she plunged to her death from a cliff. The jurors then are taken to see the cabin where Mrs. Craig died. With a policewoman standing in for his wife, Craig re-enacts events from the day she died, as he best remembers them. Later, Terry asks David to go back to his wife after the trial is over to make sure of his feelings. The defense then presents its case. After the jury retires to deliberate the verdict, David is elected foreman. On the first secret ballot, the jury is divided, with one juror responding "Don't know." During an oral vote, the undecided juror is revealed to be Lena, who explains that, although she does not think that Craig killed his wife, she does not know for sure, as she was not there. David explains that if she is not sure Craig is guilty, she must vote to acquit him. When one juror insists that Craig would have instinctively grabbed his wife if she had really fallen off the cliff, Terry stands close to him and pretends to faint. When he is unable to react quickly enough to break her fall, Terry's point is made, and he switches his position. Later, Isobel insists that even if Craig did not actually push his wife over the cliff, he is guilty of killing her in every way possible. When she slips and calls Craig "Ernest Bradford," however, it becomes apparent that her anger at her ex-husband has colored her opinion of Craig. At that, juror Arthur Timkin states that Craig's character points to his guilt and suggests that Terry and David's love affair has made them sympathetic to Craig. Terry then reveals that she has asked David to return to his wife. A new vote acquits Craig. After the verdict is delivered, Terry and David discuss their future and realize that a relationship based on hurting other people would never work. Terry decides that she will return to Cleveland and her husband.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Release Date
Mar 24, 1950
Premiere Information
New York opening: 10 Mar 1950
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Ladies and Gentlemen by Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht (New York, 17 Oct 1939), as produced by Gilbert Miller, which was based on the play Twelve in a Box by Laszlo Bus-Fekete (production undetermined).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 28m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,923ft

Articles

Perfect Strangers


Perfect Strangers (1950) reunited Ginger Rogers with her Kitty Foyle (1940) co-star Dennis Morgan in a film adapted from the Ben Hecht-Charles MacArthur play Ladies and Gentleman which opened in New York in October 1939. That play had been based on an earlier Hungarian play, Twelve in a Box written by Lazlo Bush-Fekete. In the film, Rogers and Morgan play members of a murder trial jury who find themselves sequestered and fall in love. The problem is, he is married with two kids, and she is separated.

In the cast along with Rogers and Morgan was the always reliable Thelma Ritter, who came as close to stardom as a character actress can. Instantly recognizable and with a voice like rusty iron, she would appear in her best known film All About Eve (1950) the same year. Fans of The Flintstones, should look for Alan Reed, the voice of Fred Flintstone, as Harry Patullo. Margalo Gillmore, who played Mrs. Bradford, was an old friend of Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, dating back to the 1920s when she was a member of the Algonquin Round Table; the famed New York group of writers, actors and artists including Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, and Harpo Marx.

Despite the talent in Perfect Strangers, the critics were not impressed with the end result. The Rotarian magazine wrote that while "Documentation of how the U.S. jury system works is interesting - although hardly designed to incite confidence in it. [...] The love affair, however, lacks motivation and hence will not claim much of your sympathy." Bosley Crowther, in his New York Times review of the film, blamed both the screenplay by Edith R. Sommer and the original play by Hecht-MacArthur. Only the director received approval, "In spite of the weak script, [director] Bretaigne Windust has done the best with his batch of characters and has even projected some slight comment on jury duty out of a lot of cluttered gags. Jerry Wald, who produced for Warners, should thank him more than the writers, one and all." Crowther felt that Rogers and Morgan were "pretty dreary throughout the film" because they were "rather lightly and haphazardly mixed into the makings of this random little fiction without any real regard for their bright skills. And most of the humor in the offering-of which there is considerable, of a strictly byplay sort-derives from the incidental characters, not from the activities of the stars."

Although it could have been merely a publicity ploy, the studio trailer for Perfect Strangers featured Ginger telling moviegoers that she and Dennis Morgan had been searching for the right film to star opposite each other again after Kitty Foyle and Perfect Strangers was it. In England the movie was released as Too Dangerous to Love.

Producer: Jerry Wald
Director: Bretaigne Windust
Screenplay: Edith Oppenheimer; George Oppenheimer (adaptation); Ben Hecht, Charles MacArthur (play "Ladies and Gentlemen"), L. Bush-Fekete (play)
Cinematography: Peverell Marley
Art Direction: Stanley Fleischer
Music: Leigh Harline
Film Editing: David Weisbart
Cast: Ginger Rogers (Theresa 'Terry' Scott), Dennis Morgan (David Campbell), Thelma Ritter (Lena Fassler), Margalo Gillmore (Isobel Bradford), Anthony Ross (Robert 'Bob' Fisher), Howard Freeman (Arthur Timkin), Alan Reed (Harry Patullo).
BW-85m.

by Lorraine LoBianco

SOURCES:
Crowther, Bosley "The Screen in Review; Dennis Morgan, Ginger Rogers Seen as 'Perfect Strangers,' New Bill at the Strand" The New York Times 11 Mar 50
The Films of Ginger Rogers by Homer Dickens
http://www.imdb.com
The Rotarian Jun 1950
Perfect Strangers

Perfect Strangers

Perfect Strangers (1950) reunited Ginger Rogers with her Kitty Foyle (1940) co-star Dennis Morgan in a film adapted from the Ben Hecht-Charles MacArthur play Ladies and Gentleman which opened in New York in October 1939. That play had been based on an earlier Hungarian play, Twelve in a Box written by Lazlo Bush-Fekete. In the film, Rogers and Morgan play members of a murder trial jury who find themselves sequestered and fall in love. The problem is, he is married with two kids, and she is separated. In the cast along with Rogers and Morgan was the always reliable Thelma Ritter, who came as close to stardom as a character actress can. Instantly recognizable and with a voice like rusty iron, she would appear in her best known film All About Eve (1950) the same year. Fans of The Flintstones, should look for Alan Reed, the voice of Fred Flintstone, as Harry Patullo. Margalo Gillmore, who played Mrs. Bradford, was an old friend of Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, dating back to the 1920s when she was a member of the Algonquin Round Table; the famed New York group of writers, actors and artists including Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley, and Harpo Marx. Despite the talent in Perfect Strangers, the critics were not impressed with the end result. The Rotarian magazine wrote that while "Documentation of how the U.S. jury system works is interesting - although hardly designed to incite confidence in it. [...] The love affair, however, lacks motivation and hence will not claim much of your sympathy." Bosley Crowther, in his New York Times review of the film, blamed both the screenplay by Edith R. Sommer and the original play by Hecht-MacArthur. Only the director received approval, "In spite of the weak script, [director] Bretaigne Windust has done the best with his batch of characters and has even projected some slight comment on jury duty out of a lot of cluttered gags. Jerry Wald, who produced for Warners, should thank him more than the writers, one and all." Crowther felt that Rogers and Morgan were "pretty dreary throughout the film" because they were "rather lightly and haphazardly mixed into the makings of this random little fiction without any real regard for their bright skills. And most of the humor in the offering-of which there is considerable, of a strictly byplay sort-derives from the incidental characters, not from the activities of the stars." Although it could have been merely a publicity ploy, the studio trailer for Perfect Strangers featured Ginger telling moviegoers that she and Dennis Morgan had been searching for the right film to star opposite each other again after Kitty Foyle and Perfect Strangers was it. In England the movie was released as Too Dangerous to Love. Producer: Jerry Wald Director: Bretaigne Windust Screenplay: Edith Oppenheimer; George Oppenheimer (adaptation); Ben Hecht, Charles MacArthur (play "Ladies and Gentlemen"), L. Bush-Fekete (play) Cinematography: Peverell Marley Art Direction: Stanley Fleischer Music: Leigh Harline Film Editing: David Weisbart Cast: Ginger Rogers (Theresa 'Terry' Scott), Dennis Morgan (David Campbell), Thelma Ritter (Lena Fassler), Margalo Gillmore (Isobel Bradford), Anthony Ross (Robert 'Bob' Fisher), Howard Freeman (Arthur Timkin), Alan Reed (Harry Patullo). BW-85m. by Lorraine LoBianco SOURCES: Crowther, Bosley "The Screen in Review; Dennis Morgan, Ginger Rogers Seen as 'Perfect Strangers,' New Bill at the Strand" The New York Times 11 Mar 50 The Films of Ginger Rogers by Homer Dickens http://www.imdb.com The Rotarian Jun 1950

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