Pee-Wee's Big Adventure


1h 30m 1985

Brief Synopsis

When his prized bicycle is stolen, a small-town boy searches the country for it.

Film Details

Also Known As
As Grandes Aventuras de Pee-Wee, La gran aventura de Pee Wee, La gran aventura de Simplsn, Pee wee's Big Adventure, Pee-Wees stora äventyr, gran aventura de Pee-wee
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Family
Mystery
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

Pee-wee's bicycle, the keenest bike in the world, is missing. It's his most prized possession...and he's just got to get it back. Searching high, low and in between, Pee-wee hits the open road and encounters riotous adventures with bikers, bums, cowboys, cons, a phantom trucker and a waitress with wanderlust and even Warner Bros. Studios.

Crew

Richard Abramson

Producer

Mary Albee

Stunts

J P Amateau

Stunts

Bob Badami

Music Editor

Steve Bartek

Music Arranger

Amanda Baxley

Stunts

Paul Baxley

Stunt Coordinator

Neil Brody

Sound

Alonzo Brown

Stunts

Paul H Chadwick

Production

Stephen Chicco

Animator

David B Cohen

Sound Editor

Robert P Cohen

Assistant Director

Danny Elfman

Music

Robert E. Engelman

Assistant Director

Corey Eubanks

Stunts

Theresa Eubanks

Stunts

Tracey Eubanks

Stunts

Anthony Goldschmidt

Main Title Design

Marian Green

Stunts

Frank Griffin

Makeup

Cecelia Hall

Sound Editor

Don Happy

Stunts

Phil Hartman

Screenplay

Suzanne Harvey

Stunts

Rick Heinrichs

Digital Effects Supervisor

Robert Herron

Stunts

Petur Hliddal

Sound Mixer

Shelly Hoffman

Stunts

Denise Horta

Sound Editor

David J Hudson

Sound

Jeff Imada

Stunts

Dream Quest Images

Special Effects

Joey Ippolito

Sound Editor

Sandra Berke Jordan

Costumes

Victor J Kemper

Director Of Photography

Victor J Kemper

Dp/Cinematographer

Jorgen Klubien

Animator

Angelo Lamonea

Stunts

Richard Little

Costumes

Steve Mack

Stunts

Joe Margucci

Stunts

Solomon I Marx

Stunts

William E Mceuen

Executive Producer

Troy Melton

Stunts

Samuel L. Mercer

Location Manager

Christie Miele

Animal Trainer

Wallis Nicita

Casting

David Pettijohn

Sound Editor

Terry Porter

Sound

Paul Reubens

Screenplay

Chuck Rio

Song

Aggie Guerard Rodgers

Costume Designer

Pat Romano

Stunts

Thomas Roysden

Set Decorator

John Scheele

Animator

Fred Scheiwiller

Stunts

Robert W Shapiro

Producer

Dave Silver

Unit Production Manager

Willie E Simmons

Assistant Director

Dee Snider

Song

David L Snyder

Production Designer

Russell Solberg

Stunts

Stagg Summers

Stunts

Robert C. Thomas

Camera Operator

James E Tocci

Set Designer

Don Vargas

Costumes

Michael C Varhol

Screenplay

Harvey Waldman

Assistant Director

Billy Weber

Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
As Grandes Aventuras de Pee-Wee, La gran aventura de Pee Wee, La gran aventura de Simplsn, Pee wee's Big Adventure, Pee-Wees stora äventyr, gran aventura de Pee-wee
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Family
Mystery
Release Date
1985
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)


Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86.

Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967).

But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk).

Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn.

Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86. Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967). But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk). Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn. Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States June 2010

Released in United States on Video November 4, 2008

Released in United States Summer August 9, 1985

Shown at Los Angeles Film Festival (Special Screenings) June 17-27, 2010.

Released in United States June 2010 (Shown at Los Angeles Film Festival (Special Screenings) June 17-27, 2010.)

Released in United States Summer August 9, 1985

Released in United States on Video November 4, 2008