Out of the Blue


1h 26m 1947

Brief Synopsis

Set in an apartment building whose occupants include Arthur Earthleigh (George Brent), a meek and mild type married to the beautiful-but-domineering Mae (Carole Landis), a Bohemian artist, David Galleo (Turhan Bey) and his always-there model, Deborah Tyler (Virginia Mayo), and Olive Jensen (Ann Dvorak), a Greenwich Village type who is always slightly-but-continuously inebriated, and whose motto is "love and let love." She calls on George while his wife is out, and when she passes out during his attempts to get her out before his wife returns, he thinks she is dead and deposits her on Galleo's terrace. Galleo takes advantage of the situation by using it in a blackmail scheme against Arthur, which is shakey, at best, as Olive refuses to stay dead.

Film Details

Also Known As
Vera Caspary's Out of the Blue
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Release Date
Oct 11, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Eagle-Lion Films, Inc.
Distribution Company
Eagle-Lion Films, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,703ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

When Mae Earthleigh discovers a dog bone buried in the zinneas on her Greenwich Village terrace, she demands that her milquetoast husband Arthur complain to the dog's owner, next-door neighbor David Galleo. Galleo, a playboy artist, is nonplussed by Arthur's griping, however, so at Mae's urging, Arthur goes off to see his lawyer about having the dog, Rabelais, evicted. Galleo is then visited by Deborah Tyler, a fellow dog owner who wants Rabelais, a prize-winning German shepherd, to mate with her purebred dog. Instantly attracted to the college-educated Deborah, Galleo offers Rabelais' services in exchange for a modeling session. While Deborah reluctantly poses in a bathing suit on Galleo's terrace, she is watched by his upstairs neighbors, nosey spinsters Miss Spring and Miss Ritchie. Arthur, meanwhile, sees Mae, who is spending the weekend in Connecticut, off at the train station, then goes to a restaurant and drinks with Olive Jenson, a chatty, flirtatious alcoholic. Arthur is soon drunk and impulsively invites the equally intoxicated Olive to his apartment. There, Olive, an interior decorator, criticizes Mae's fussy decorating and tries to seduce Arthur. In a panic, Arthur insists that Olive leave, but while he is calling a taxi, Olive mistakes the spare bedroom door for the front door and passes out on the bed. Not seeing Olive in the living room, Arthur assumes that she has left and retires for the night. The next morning, Arthur is stunned to discover the decorator still in his apartment, demanding brandy. Galleo, meanwhile, receives a telegram from Arthur's lawyer informing him that he will be evicted in twenty-four hours unless he gets rid of Rabelais. To solve the immediate dilemma, Deborah convinces Galleo to put Rabelais in a Westchester kennel. Later, Arthur abandons Olive at a bar, while Galleo tries unsuccessfully to seduce Deborah. As Arthur is about to leave for the station to pick up Mae, Olive shows up and invites herself in. Arthur tries to shove Olive out the door, and during the ensuing struggle, Olive, who claims to have heart trouble, drops in a heap to the floor. After a desperate Arthur dumps Olive on Galleo's terrace and races off to meet Mae's train, Miss Spring sees her body and calls both the police and Galleo. Before the police arrive, however, Olive revives and accuses Arthur of striking her, giving Galleo an idea. Wearing Olive's distinctive dress, Deborah convinces the police and Miss Spring that she is the supposed dead woman. Galleo then dresses a modeling mannequin in Olive's clothes and convinces Arthur that he has Olive's corpse and will expose him as her killer unless the eviction notice is revoked. Terrified, Arthur agrees to help Galleo and Deborah bury "Olive" in Westchester, and while Galleo reclaims his dog, Arthur is forced to bury a trunk he believes contains Olive. The next morning, however, Arthur spots Olive on the artist's terrace. Arthur rushes to see his lawyer and tells him everything about the previous night. Galleo, meanwhile, proposes impulsively to Deborah, then finds Olive passed out on his floor. Galleo drags Olive to Arthur's terrace, where she is again seen by Miss Spring. Once again, Olive wakes up before the police arrive and is tended to by the spinsters and an unsuspecting Mae. Arthur then returns home and faints upon seeing Olive with Mae, and Olive passes out for a third time. After Arthur carries Olive back to Galleo's terrace, he informs the artist that his lawyer dug up the trunk and is suing him for attempted blackmail. Deborah then arrives at Galleo's and, upon seeing the unconscious Olive on his couch, is overcome with jealousy. While the police, the spinsters, Deborah and Galleo struggle to sort matters out, Arthur suddenly confronts Mae about their marriage. Later, after a transformed Arthur has asserted himself with Mae, the Earthleighs enjoy a quiet breakfast on their terrace. Next door, the newly married Galleos enjoy their own breakfast, under the approving eyes of Miss Spring and Miss Ritchie.

Film Details

Also Known As
Vera Caspary's Out of the Blue
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Release Date
Oct 11, 1947
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Eagle-Lion Films, Inc.
Distribution Company
Eagle-Lion Films, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,703ft (9 reels)

Articles

Virginia Mayo (1920-2005)


Virginia Mayo, the delectable, "peaches and cream" leading lady of the 40s, who on occasion, could prove herself quite capable in dramatic parts, died on January 17 at a nursing home in Thousand Oaks, CA of pneumonia and heart failure. She was 84.

She was born Virginia Clara Jones in St. Louis, Missouri on November 30, 1920, and got her show business start at the age of six by enrolling in her aunt's School of Dramatic Expression. While still in her teens, she joined the nightclub circuit, and after paying her dues for a few years traveling across the country, she eventually caught the eye of movie mogul Samuel Goldwyn. He gave her a small role in her first film, starring future husband, Michael O'Shea, in Jack London (1943). She then received minor billing as a "Goldwyn Girl," in the Danny Kaye farce, Up In Arms (1944). Almost immediately, Goldwyn saw her natural movement, comfort and ease in front of the camera, and in just her fourth film, she landed a plumb lead opposite Bob Hope in The Princess and the Pirate (1944). She proved a hit with moviegoers, and her next two films would be with her most frequent leading man, Danny Kaye: Wonder Man (1945), and The Kid from Brooklyn (1946). Both films were big hits, and the chemistry between Mayo and Kaye - the classy, reserved blonde beauty clashing with the hyperactive clown - was surprisingly successful.

Mayo did make a brief break from light comedy, and gave a good performance as Dana Andrews' unfaithful wife, Marie, in the popular post-war drama, The Best Years of Their Lives (1946); but despite the good reviews, she was back with Kaye in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947), and A Song Is Born (1948).

It wasn't until the following year that Mayo got the chance to sink her teeth into a meaty role. That film, White Heat (1949), and her role, as Cody Jarrett's (James Cagney) sluttish, conniving wife, Verna, is memorable for the sheer ruthlessness of her performance. Remember, it was Verna who shot Cody¿s mother in the back, and yet when Cody confronts her after he escapes from prison to exact revenge for her death, Verna effectively places the blame on Big Ed (Steve Cochran):

Verna: I can't tell you Cody!
Cody: Tell me!
Verna: Ed...he shot her in the back!!!

Critics and fans purred over the newfound versatility, yet strangely, she never found a part as juicy as Verna again. Her next film, with Cagney, The West Point Story (1950), was a pleasant enough musical; but her role as Lady Wellesley in Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N. (1951), co-starring Gregory Peck, was merely decorative; that of a burlesque queen attempting to earn a university degree in the gormless comedy, She¿s Working Her Way Through College (1952); and worst of all, the Biblical bomb, The Silver Chalice (1954) which was, incidentally, Paul Newman's film debut, and is a film he still derides as the worst of his career.

Realizing that her future in movies was slowing down, she turned to the supper club circuit in the 60s with her husband, Michael O'Shea, touring the country in such productions as No, No Nanette, Barefoot in the Park, Hello Dolly, and Butterflies Are Free. Like most performers who had outdistanced their glory days with the film industry, Mayo turned to television for the next two decades, appearing in such shows as Night Gallery, Police Story, Murder She Wrote, and Remington Steele. She even earned a recurring role in the short-lived NBC soap opera, Santa Barbara (1984-85), playing an aging hoofer named "Peaches DeLight." Mayo was married to O'Shea from 1947 until his death in 1973. She is survived by their daughter, Mary Johnston; and three grandsons.

by Michael T. Toole
Virginia Mayo (1920-2005)

Virginia Mayo (1920-2005)

Virginia Mayo, the delectable, "peaches and cream" leading lady of the 40s, who on occasion, could prove herself quite capable in dramatic parts, died on January 17 at a nursing home in Thousand Oaks, CA of pneumonia and heart failure. She was 84. She was born Virginia Clara Jones in St. Louis, Missouri on November 30, 1920, and got her show business start at the age of six by enrolling in her aunt's School of Dramatic Expression. While still in her teens, she joined the nightclub circuit, and after paying her dues for a few years traveling across the country, she eventually caught the eye of movie mogul Samuel Goldwyn. He gave her a small role in her first film, starring future husband, Michael O'Shea, in Jack London (1943). She then received minor billing as a "Goldwyn Girl," in the Danny Kaye farce, Up In Arms (1944). Almost immediately, Goldwyn saw her natural movement, comfort and ease in front of the camera, and in just her fourth film, she landed a plumb lead opposite Bob Hope in The Princess and the Pirate (1944). She proved a hit with moviegoers, and her next two films would be with her most frequent leading man, Danny Kaye: Wonder Man (1945), and The Kid from Brooklyn (1946). Both films were big hits, and the chemistry between Mayo and Kaye - the classy, reserved blonde beauty clashing with the hyperactive clown - was surprisingly successful. Mayo did make a brief break from light comedy, and gave a good performance as Dana Andrews' unfaithful wife, Marie, in the popular post-war drama, The Best Years of Their Lives (1946); but despite the good reviews, she was back with Kaye in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947), and A Song Is Born (1948). It wasn't until the following year that Mayo got the chance to sink her teeth into a meaty role. That film, White Heat (1949), and her role, as Cody Jarrett's (James Cagney) sluttish, conniving wife, Verna, is memorable for the sheer ruthlessness of her performance. Remember, it was Verna who shot Cody¿s mother in the back, and yet when Cody confronts her after he escapes from prison to exact revenge for her death, Verna effectively places the blame on Big Ed (Steve Cochran): Verna: I can't tell you Cody! Cody: Tell me! Verna: Ed...he shot her in the back!!! Critics and fans purred over the newfound versatility, yet strangely, she never found a part as juicy as Verna again. Her next film, with Cagney, The West Point Story (1950), was a pleasant enough musical; but her role as Lady Wellesley in Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N. (1951), co-starring Gregory Peck, was merely decorative; that of a burlesque queen attempting to earn a university degree in the gormless comedy, She¿s Working Her Way Through College (1952); and worst of all, the Biblical bomb, The Silver Chalice (1954) which was, incidentally, Paul Newman's film debut, and is a film he still derides as the worst of his career. Realizing that her future in movies was slowing down, she turned to the supper club circuit in the 60s with her husband, Michael O'Shea, touring the country in such productions as No, No Nanette, Barefoot in the Park, Hello Dolly, and Butterflies Are Free. Like most performers who had outdistanced their glory days with the film industry, Mayo turned to television for the next two decades, appearing in such shows as Night Gallery, Police Story, Murder She Wrote, and Remington Steele. She even earned a recurring role in the short-lived NBC soap opera, Santa Barbara (1984-85), playing an aging hoofer named "Peaches DeLight." Mayo was married to O'Shea from 1947 until his death in 1973. She is survived by their daughter, Mary Johnston; and three grandsons. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's title card reads: "Vera Caspary's Out of the Blue." Caspary's screen story was serialized in Today's Woman in September 1947. According to a Los Angeles Examiner news item, Caspary, who wrote the novel on which Fox's successful film Laura was based (see entry above), secured a "percentage deal" with Eagle-Lion for this picture. Joan Leslie was slated to star in the film, according to the same item. In January 1947, Tom Conway was announced in Hollywood Reporter as the picture's male lead. Hollywood Reporter then announced that Eagle-Lion was borrowing James Craig from M-G-M to star in the production.