101 Dalmatians


1h 20m 1961

Brief Synopsis

Pongo and Perdita have a litter of 15 puppies. Cruella De Vil takes a fancy to the pups, and wants to get hold of them, as well as more pups, to make herself a loveley dalmation skin coat... Cruella gets some thugs to kidnap the pups and hold them at her mansion. Will Pongo and Perdita find them in time ?

Film Details

Also Known As
Pongo och de 101 dalmatinerna, Walt Disney's 101 Dalmatians
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1961
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Company; Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 20m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1, 1.75 : 1

Synopsis

Pongo and Perdita have a litter of 15 puppies. Cruella De Vil takes a fancy to the pups, and wants to get hold of them, as well as more pups, to make herself a loveley dalmation skin coat... Cruella gets some thugs to kidnap the pups and hold them at her mansion. Will Pongo and Perdita find them in time ?

Crew

Hal Ambro

Character Animation

Kenneth Anderson

Production Designer

Kenneth Anderson

Art Director

Ray Aragon

Layout Artist

Dale Barnhart

Layout Artist

Ted Berman

Character Animation

Jack Boyd

Visual Effects

Roy Brewer

Editor

George Bruns

Music

Jack Buckley

Visual Effects

Collin Campbell

Layout Artist

Les Clark

Character Animation

Eric Cleworth

Character Animation

Robert O. Cook

Sound Supervisor

Basil Davidovich

Layout Artist

Marc Davis

Animation Director

Albert Dempster

Other

Walt Disney

Producer

Vance Gerry

Layout Artist

Blaine Gibson

Character Animation

Don Griffith

Layout Artist

Victor Haboush

Layout Artist

Joe Hale

Layout Artist

Donald Halliday

Editor

Ralph Hulett

Other

Ub Iwerks

Other

Oliver M. Johnston Jr.

Animation Director

Homer Jonas

Layout Artist

Milt Kahl

Animation Director

Bill Keil

Character Animation

Evelyn Kennedy

Music Editor

Hal King

Character Animation

Sammie June Lanham

Layout Artist

Eric Larson

Animation Director

Bill Layne

Other

Mel Leven

Song

John Lounsberry

Animation Director

Dick Lucas

Character Animation

Don Lusk

Character Animation

Eustace Lycett

Other

Dan Macmanus

Visual Effects

Franklyn Marks

Music Arranger

Cliff Nordberg

Character Animation

Erni Nordli

Layout Artist

Tom Oreb

Other

Amby Paliwoda

Character Animation

Ed Parks

Visual Effects

William Peed

Story By

William Peed

Other

William Peed

From Story

Walt Peregoy

Color

Ken Peterson

Production Supervisor

Anthony Rizzo

Other

John Sibley

Character Animation

Dodie Smith

Book As Source Material

Art Stevens

Character Animation

Mclaren Stewart

Layout Artist

Julius Svendsen

Character Animation

Frank Thomas

Animation Director

Dick Ung

Layout Artist

Al Zinnen

Layout Artist

Film Details

Also Known As
Pongo och de 101 dalmatinerna, Walt Disney's 101 Dalmatians
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1961
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Company; Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 20m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1, 1.75 : 1

Articles

Frank Thomas (1912-2004)


Legendary Disney animator Frank Thomas, whose work ranged from such '30s classics like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to equally acclaimed modern hits like The Rescuers, died on September 8 in his home in Flintridge, California. He had been in declining health since suffering a brain hemorrhage several months ago. He was 92.

He was born on September 5, 1912 in Santa Monica, California. He showed an interest in art and drawing at a very young age, so it came as no surprise when he graduated from Stanford University in 1934 with a degree in art. Soon after, he began work for Walt Disney Studios and did his first animation for the short Mickey's Elephant in 1936, and was one of the key animators for the studios' first, feature-length animated picture, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). His memorable creations of the seven dwarfs offered an emotional sweep and humorous detail to animated characters that audiences had never experienced before, and his career was set.

Thomas' work from this point on would be nothing short of the high watermarks in Disney animation that is justly cherished the world over: the title character in Pinocchio, (1940); Thumper teaching Bambi to skate in Bambi (1941); the wicked stepmother in Cinderella (1950), the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland (1951), the terrific fight sequence between Captain Hook and Peter Pan in Peter Pan (1953); the Lady and Rover falling in love over a dish of spaghetti and meatballs in Lady and the Tramp (1955); the three good fairies in Sleeping Beauty (1959); Baloo, Mowgli and Kaa in The Jungle Book (1967); and his final work of Bernard and Bianca in the underrated The Rescuers (1977).

Thomas retired from Disney in early 1978, ending a near 44-year relationship with the studio. With longtime friend, and fellow Disney collaborator Ollie Johnston, they went on to author many fine books about the art of animation, most notably Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life (Hyperian Press, 1978) and The Disney Villain (Hyperion Press, 1993). He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Jeanette; sons Thomas, Doug and Gregg; daughter Ann Ayers; and three grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Frank Thomas (1912-2004)

Frank Thomas (1912-2004)

Legendary Disney animator Frank Thomas, whose work ranged from such '30s classics like Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to equally acclaimed modern hits like The Rescuers, died on September 8 in his home in Flintridge, California. He had been in declining health since suffering a brain hemorrhage several months ago. He was 92. He was born on September 5, 1912 in Santa Monica, California. He showed an interest in art and drawing at a very young age, so it came as no surprise when he graduated from Stanford University in 1934 with a degree in art. Soon after, he began work for Walt Disney Studios and did his first animation for the short Mickey's Elephant in 1936, and was one of the key animators for the studios' first, feature-length animated picture, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). His memorable creations of the seven dwarfs offered an emotional sweep and humorous detail to animated characters that audiences had never experienced before, and his career was set. Thomas' work from this point on would be nothing short of the high watermarks in Disney animation that is justly cherished the world over: the title character in Pinocchio, (1940); Thumper teaching Bambi to skate in Bambi (1941); the wicked stepmother in Cinderella (1950), the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland (1951), the terrific fight sequence between Captain Hook and Peter Pan in Peter Pan (1953); the Lady and Rover falling in love over a dish of spaghetti and meatballs in Lady and the Tramp (1955); the three good fairies in Sleeping Beauty (1959); Baloo, Mowgli and Kaa in The Jungle Book (1967); and his final work of Bernard and Bianca in the underrated The Rescuers (1977). Thomas retired from Disney in early 1978, ending a near 44-year relationship with the studio. With longtime friend, and fellow Disney collaborator Ollie Johnston, they went on to author many fine books about the art of animation, most notably Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life (Hyperian Press, 1978) and The Disney Villain (Hyperion Press, 1993). He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Jeanette; sons Thomas, Doug and Gregg; daughter Ann Ayers; and three grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

The humans have tried everything. Now it's up to us dogs.
- Great Dane
I'm hungry, Mother. I'm hungry.
- Rolly
Now Rolly, you just had your dinner.
- Perdita
But I am just the same. I'm so hungry I could eat a... a whole elephant.
- Rolly
Mother, Dad, Patch pushed me into the fireplace.
- Lucky
Lucky pushed me first.
- Patch
Did not!
- Lucky
Did too!
- Patch
Did not!
- Lucky
Come out, puppies. I'm not going to hurt you.
- Jasper
I thought we were gonna pop 'em off.
- Horace
Shut up!
- Jasper
Lady! What are trying to do? Crazy woman driver!
- Truck Driver
Is that a new coat, Cruella?
- Anita
Yes it is, Anita! I live for furs! I worship furs! Is there anyone in this wretched world who doesn't?
- Cruella De Vil

Trivia

Someone counted all black spots in the movie, frame-by-frame, and reached the total of 6,469,952.

Several of the characters from Lady and the Tramp (1955) can be seen in a pet shop window during the twilight bark sequence.

At one point Jasper and Horace's TV set features Disney's award-winning cartoon short Flowers and Trees (1932).

When the Baduns are talking on the phone to Cruella, they are holding a newspaper. The only headline on the front page (apart from the dognapping) is CARLSEN SPEAKS, and a picture of a capsized ship. This helps us to date the story, since the Carlsen in question is Kurt Carlsen, captain of the freighter Flying Enterprise, which sank after a prolonged struggle in the Atlantic. This was the media event of the year in 1952.

The first Disney feature film to use photocopying technology (Xerography), which made an animated film with this much visual complexity possible. It also set the visual style of Disney animation (a scratchy, hard outline look) for years until the technology advanced enough (with the production of Rescuers, The (1977)) to allow a softer look.

Miscellaneous Notes

Re-released in United States 1969

Re-released in United States 1979

Re-released in United States December 20, 1985

Re-released in United States July 12, 1991

Released in United States on Video April 10, 1992

Re-released in United States on Video March 9, 1999

Based on the children's novel "The Hundred and One Dalmatians," written by Dodie Smith and published in 1956.

Released in United States January 1961

Re-released in United States 1969

Re-released in United States 1979

Re-released in United States December 20, 1985

Re-released in United States July 12, 1991

Released in United States on Video April 10, 1992

Re-released in United States on Video March 9, 1999

Released in United States January 1961