Oh, God! You Devil


1h 36m 1984

Brief Synopsis

A struggling songwriter sells his soul to the devil for success, but then God tries to intervene.

Film Details

Also Known As
Oh, God! You Devil
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1984
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

A struggling songwriter sells his soul to the devil for success, but then God tries to intervene.

Film Details

Also Known As
Oh, God! You Devil
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1984
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures Distribution

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Articles

Eugene Roche (1928-2004)


Eugene Roche, the marvelous character actor who had a knack for shining in offbeat roles, such as Edgar Derby, ill-fated prisoner of war in Slaughterhouse Five (1972), and the murderous archbishop in Foul Play (1978), died in Encino, California of a heart attack on July 28. He was 75.

Born on September 22, 1928, in Boston, Massachusettes, Roche began his career when he was still in High School, doing voice characterization on radio in his native Boston. After he graduated, he served in the Army, then studied drama on the G.I. bill at Emerson College. Concentrating on acting, he found much stage work in San Francisco in the early `50s, then headed for New York in the early `60s and began appearing on televison (Naked City, Route 66) and on Broadway. 

It wasn't until he was in his forties did Roche began to get really good parts. His open, friendly face and stocky build made him the ideal choice to play the likable POW, Edgar Derby in Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five. His role as Edgar who saves an intact porcelain figurine from the ruins of Dresden only to be executed by his German captors for looting, may have been brief, but it was instantly memorable. Fine roles continued to come his way in films throughout the decade, the highlights included: They Might Be Giants (1971), Mr. Ricco (1975), The Late Show (1977), Corvette Summer (a deft comic performance as a high school auto shop teacher who is secretly running a car theft ring), and Foul Play (both 1978).

Yet, it would be on television where Roche would find lasting success. He became a household face when, as Squeaky Clean, he became the spokesman for Ajax household cleaner. Then he struck gold in sitcoms: Archie Bunker's practical joking nemesis, Pinky Peterson on All in the Family (1976-78), the madly romantic attorney, Ronald Mallu on Soap (1978-81), and the lovable landlord Bill Parker on Webster (1984-86).

Roche is survived by his wife, Anntoni; his brother, John; his sister, Clara Hewes; nine children, one of which, a son Eamonn, is a successful working actor; and nine grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Eugene Roche (1928-2004)

Eugene Roche (1928-2004)

Eugene Roche, the marvelous character actor who had a knack for shining in offbeat roles, such as Edgar Derby, ill-fated prisoner of war in Slaughterhouse Five (1972), and the murderous archbishop in Foul Play (1978), died in Encino, California of a heart attack on July 28. He was 75. Born on September 22, 1928, in Boston, Massachusettes, Roche began his career when he was still in High School, doing voice characterization on radio in his native Boston. After he graduated, he served in the Army, then studied drama on the G.I. bill at Emerson College. Concentrating on acting, he found much stage work in San Francisco in the early `50s, then headed for New York in the early `60s and began appearing on televison (Naked City, Route 66) and on Broadway.  It wasn't until he was in his forties did Roche began to get really good parts. His open, friendly face and stocky build made him the ideal choice to play the likable POW, Edgar Derby in Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five. His role as Edgar who saves an intact porcelain figurine from the ruins of Dresden only to be executed by his German captors for looting, may have been brief, but it was instantly memorable. Fine roles continued to come his way in films throughout the decade, the highlights included: They Might Be Giants (1971), Mr. Ricco (1975), The Late Show (1977), Corvette Summer (a deft comic performance as a high school auto shop teacher who is secretly running a car theft ring), and Foul Play (both 1978). Yet, it would be on television where Roche would find lasting success. He became a household face when, as Squeaky Clean, he became the spokesman for Ajax household cleaner. Then he struck gold in sitcoms: Archie Bunker's practical joking nemesis, Pinky Peterson on All in the Family (1976-78), the madly romantic attorney, Ronald Mallu on Soap (1978-81), and the lovable landlord Bill Parker on Webster (1984-86). Roche is survived by his wife, Anntoni; his brother, John; his sister, Clara Hewes; nine children, one of which, a son Eamonn, is a successful working actor; and nine grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

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Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1984

Released in United States 1984