Of Mice and Men


1h 50m 1992

Brief Synopsis

Story about the friendship between two ranch hands during the Depression.

Film Details

Also Known As
Des Souris et des Hommes, Möss och människor, souris et des hommes
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Santa Ynez Valley, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m

Synopsis

Story about the friendship between two ranch hands during the Depression.

Crew

Tamara Allen

Assistant Production Coordinator

Don Ames

Special Thanks To

Trent Anderson

Assistant Camera Operator

Frida Aradottir

Hair

Ron Ashmore

Other

Gerard Averill

Production Assistant

Adam Beason

Set Production Assistant

Kenneth B Belsky

Stunts

Alan C. Blomquist

Executive Producer

Alan C. Blomquist

Unit Production Manager

Lynn Bopeley

Boom Operator

Charles Brewer

Stunts

David Brownlow

Sound Mixer

Kip Brundage

Special Thanks To

Tom Carlson

Music Editor

Alan Caso

Director Of Photography

Alan Caso

Dp/Cinematographer

John Ceniceros

On-Set Dresser

Tim Christenson

Production Associate

Sharal Churchill

Music

Jim Clark

Special Thanks To

Bryan Stewart Constans

Production Assistant

Andrew Cooper

Photography

Charlie Croughwell

Stunt Coordinator

Kerrie Cullen

Stunts

Shay Cunliffe

Costume Designer

Thomas A Davila

Production Accountant

Daniel R Davis

Art Director

Bonita Dehaven

Makeup Artist

Carlos Delarios

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Linda Distenfield

Special Thanks To

Giles Dunning

Assistant Camera Operator

Charlie Edwards

Grip

David Elliott

Construction Coordinator

Noreen Evans

Assistant Editor

Joel Fein

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Horton Foote

Screenplay

Wayne Forman

Caterer

Carla Christina Formica

Assistant Editor

Mary J Gamble

Special Thanks To

Stanley Garner

Special Thanks To

Cara Giallanza

Assistant Director

Joyce Anne Gilstrap

Set Decorator

Franklyn M Gottbetter

Video Playback

David Granis

Foley Editor

Mark Green

Assistant Property Master

David Gropman

Production Designer

Barbara A Hall

Production Coordinator

Peggy Hannaman

Hair Assistant

Terry Haskell

Property Master

Paul Hauser

Electrician

Annette Haywood-carter

Script Supervisor

Gary Hecker

Foley Mixer

Wayne Heitman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Dave Higby

Production Assistant

Pieter Hubbard

Sound Editor

Mark Isham

Music

Greg Jackson

Casting Associate

Tony Jefferson

Stunts

Howard Jensen

Special Effects

Amanda Mackey Johnson

Casting

Andy Kopetzky

Sound Editor

Stephen Krause

Music

Jackie Krost

Music

Ken Kugler

Music Conductor

Ken Kugler

Music

Robert Leitelt

Grip

Packy Lennon

Electrician

Jimmy Ling

Adr Editor

Kenneth Macmillan

Dp/Cinematographer

Kenneth Macmillan

Director Of Photography

Michael Magne

Craft Service

Mary Lamar Mahler

Other

Steven Maines

Stunts

Daniel E Maltese

Assistant Art Director

William Mann

Dolly Grip

David Mcklveen

Foreman

Andrew Miller

Assistant Director

Mike Moad

Dolly Grip

Marshall Moore

Location Manager

Rocky Moriana

Foley Editor

Douglas Mosebar

Special Thanks To

Austin Myers

Assistant Costume Designer

Wayne Nelson

Transportation Coordinator

Ann Pala

Makeup Assistant

Michele Panelli-venetis

Assistant Director

Les Percy

Key Grip

Marsha Perloff

Wardrobe Supervisor

Terry Jon Pfrang

Assistant Camera Operator

Bill Phillips

Sound Editor

John Phillips

Sound Editor

Ray Prado

Storyboard Artist

Buford Randall

Other

Spiro Razatos

Stunts

Chris Reddish

Electrician

Patrick Reddish

Lighting Technician

Don Reddy

Camera Operator

Paul "sled" Reynolds

Animal Trainer

Michael Riba

Assistant Camera Operator

Hector Roca

Special Thanks To

Hal Sanders

Sound Editor

Cathy Sandrich Gelfond

Casting

Karen Schulz Gropman

Set Decorator

Michael A Shapiro

On-Set Dresser

Dan Sharp

Other

Steve Sheridan

Color Timer

Gary Sinise

Producer

Robert Sinise

Editor

Charles C Smith

Grip

Cheryl T Smith

Set Designer

Russell Smith

Producer

Gordon A Spencer

Wrangler

Elaine Steinbeck

Special Thanks To

John Steinbeck

Source Material (From Novel)

Danny L Swanson

Transportation Captain

Robert John Teitelbaum

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Steven Timinskas

Assistant Production Accountant

Christopher Todd

Sound Editor

Edward Ulrich

Stunt Coordinator

Daniel Valverde

Assistant Editor

John Vecchio

Electrician

Joanne Verkler

Assistant Location Manager

Madonna Wade-reed

Assistant

Beverly Walters

Special Thanks To

Timothy Wegman

Set Costumer

Harry W Welton

Scenic Artist

Film Details

Also Known As
Des Souris et des Hommes, Möss och människor, souris et des hommes
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Santa Ynez Valley, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 50m

Articles

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)


Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72.

Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others.

Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981).

By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama.

His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role.

In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72. Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others. Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981). By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama. His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role. In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 2, 1992

Released in United States on Video March 3, 1993

Based on John Steinbeck's novel and play of the same name.

Began shooting September 16, 1991.

Completed shooting November 20, 1991.

Lewis Milestone directed the first film adaptation in 1939 at United Artists.

Expanded released in USA October 16, 1992.

Released in United States on Video March 3, 1993

Limited Release in United States October 2, 1992

Limited Release in United States October 2, 1992

Released in United States Fall October 2, 1992