Night Of The Creeps


1h 25m 1986
Night Of The Creeps

Brief Synopsis

An alien craft crashes to Earth in 1959. The ship contains slug-like parasites that take over their hosts, turning them into murdering zombies, and one of these kills a young person on lover's lane. Then in 1986, a couple of nerdy college boys come across that body, which has been cryogenically frozen.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Horror
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Synopsis

In 1959, an alien craft crashes to Earth. The ship contains slug-like parasites that take over their hosts, turning them into murdering zombies, and one of these kills a young person on lover's lane. Then in 1986, a couple of nerdy college boys come across that body, which has been cryogenically frozen in their science lab, and steal it for a prank. When the parasite from outer space breaks free of hit host, it quickly begins infecting the student body.

Crew

Tim Abbatoye

Transportation Captain

Mark Allan

Assistant Director

John P Allen

Assistant Camera Operator

Paul Anka

Song

Paul Anka

Song Performer

Billy G Arter

Transportation Coordinator

Bill Augorola

Sound Editor

Jeff Behlendorf

Other

Richard L Bennett

Visual Effects Supervisor

Howard Berger

Makeup

Moe Blay

Driver

Michael Bloecher

Associate Editor

Gary Bolger

Sound

Michael Bolner

Electrician

Stephen Burg

Other

James Burkhart

Assistant Art Director

Bruce Byall

Grip

John J Cahill

Driver

Frankie Campbell

Hair

Jon Carpenter

Driver

Maria Caso

Set Decorator

Maria Caso

Art Director

Phillip Christon

Assistant Director

Clark Conrad

Sound Editor

George Costello

Production Designer

Christina Criscione

Song Performer

Gordon L Day

Sound

Bonita Dehaven

Hair

Bonita Dehaven

Makeup

Fred Dekker

Screenplay

Jo Anne Depauk

Production Assistant

Barry Devorzon

Music

Dick Dixon

Production Auditor

Richard Bryan Douglas

Construction Coordinator

Paul Elliott

Camera Operator

Earl Ellis

Makeup

Lee Elmendorf

Driver

Preston Epps

Song Performer

Gayle Evans

Costume Supervisor

Margaret E. Fannin

Production Coordinator

Ernest D. Farino

Titles

Ernest D. Farino

Main Title Design

Dale Fay

Miniatures

Joe Fineman

Sound Editor

William R. Finnegan

Executive Producer

James Dean Fisher

Foley Artist

Erica Fox

Assistant Director

Roger George

Special Effects

Mickey Gilbert

Stunt Coordinator

Charles Gordon

Producer

Douglas N Gray

Sound Editor

Jim Grce

Electrician

Larry Greenberg

Production Assistant

Reatha Grey

Casting

Todd Griffith

Grip

Stephen Halbert

Boom Operator

Matthew J Hannon

Carpenter

Tim Hannon

Carpenter

David Harshbarger

Props

Frieder K Hochheim

Gaffer

Hilda Hodges

Foley Artist

Barbara Issak

Sound Editor

John M Jarvis

Driver

Adam Johnston

Foley Editor

John A Joleaud

Electrician

David Jones

Miniatures

William C Jones

Carpenter

Michael Karp

Motion Control

Eileen Kennedy

Costume Designer

Michael N Knue

Editor

Robert Kurtzman

Makeup

Tony Laudati

Animator

Tim Lawrence

Makeup

David Eric Lee

Carpenter

Joseph A Liuzzi

Location Manager

Cindy Lovelady

Other

Charles Lutkus

Makeup

Mark Maitre

Makeup

Sara Markowitz

Costumes

Todd Masters

Animator

John H. Maxwell

Carpenter

Shawn Mcenroe

Makeup

Damon Medlen

Art Assistant

Kurt Meisenbach

Set Decorator

David B Miller

Other

David B Miller

Makeup

Vahan Moonsekian

Production Supervisor

Brian J Moore

Accountant

Jerry Moore

Apprentice

Patrick J Moore

Assistant Editor

Robert Moore

Driver

Malcolm T Morain

Art Assistant

Sandy Nelson

Song Performer

Robert New

Director Of Photography

Warren S Oliver

Craft Service

Gregory Pruss

Storyboard Artist

Ted Rae

Animator

Joseph Rainey

Assistant Art Director

Cynthia Rebman

On-Set Dresser

Linda Rebman

Art Assistant

Brian H Reynolds

Dolly Grip

Rick Riccobono

Music Supervisor

Stan Ridgway

Song Performer

Phil Roberts

Art Department

Phil Roberts

Other

David Roessell

Assistant

Lise Romanoff

Special Effects Assistant

Brian Ruberg

Sound

Joyce Rudolph

Photography

Anton Rupprecht

Animator

Lane G Russell

Assistant Camera Operator

Rocky Sagebiel

Security

Jacqueline Saunders

Script Supervisor

Roger Schweitzer

Video Playback

Joan Scoccimarro

Assistant

Richard D Scott

Carpenter

Marian Shambo

Other

Paul Sharpe

Sound

William Shea

Production Assistant

Phil Sloane

Key Grip

Donna Smith

Associate Producer

Donna Smith

Production Manager

Jeffrey S Smith

Dolly Grip

Ilene Starger

Casting

David Stipes

Visual Effects Supervisor

Gary H Swink

Electrician

Allen Terry

Construction Coordinator

The Diamonds

Song Performer

The Platters

Song Performer

Philip E Thomas

Casting Associate

Bud Thompson

Driver

Val Thorgusen

Driver

James Thornton

Sound Mixer

Ronald Thornton

Miniatures

Doug Timm

Music

Doug Timm

Original Music

Kyle Rae Tucy

Makeup

Thaddeus Wadleigh

Electrician

Jane Wiedlin

Song Performer

Brian A Williams

Accounting Assistant

Chino Williams

Security

Diana Williams

Animator

Gregory Wolf

Property Master

James Wolvington

Sound Editor

Bruce Zahlava

Makeup

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Horror
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m

Articles

Night of the Creeps


Growing up in the San Francisco Bay area during the early 1970s, Fred Dekker collected comic books, made amateur films, and indulged in a passion for classic monsters. At the age of 12, Dekker and a friend got to show off their homemade Planet of the Apes (1968) masks on Bob Wilkins' legendary Creature Features program on KTVU, where George Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) had its television debut. Eager to study film but rejected by the cinema departments of both University of California-Los Angeles and the University of Southern California, Dekker instead entered UCLA as an English major, where he fell in with a crowd that included future Hollywood screenwriters Shane Black (Lethal Weapon, 1987), Chris Matheson (Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure, 1989), and Ryan Rowe (Charlie's Angels, 2000). With another college roommate, Ethan Wiley, Dekker crafted the original story for the lighthearted horror lampoon House (1986), the success of which promoted Wiley to the director's chair for House II: The Second Story (1987) and Dekker to spearhead his feature film debut, Night of the Creeps (1986), released by TriStar Pictures in the summer of 1986.

Though Dekker's concept for House had been a spare black-and-white psychological thriller influenced by William Friedkin's The Exorcist (1973), horror comedies were par for the course mid-decade. In competition, Dan O'Bannon's goofy, antic The Return of the Living Dead (1985) had bested George Romero's grim, lugubrious Day of the Dead (1985) and good-natured yuks were the soul of the plots of Gremlins (1984), Fright Night (1985), and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Part 2 (1986). Crafting his maiden voyage in the genre as an homage to the films and filmmakers who had inspired him, Dekker set the tongue-in-cheek but decidedly gnarly Night of the Creeps at the fictional Corman University, where extraterrestrial parasites have turned the student body into a legion of killer zombies. Tipping his hat to a host of influences, Dekker named characters after George Romero, David Cronenberg, John Landis, Tobe Hooper, Sam Raimi, and John Carpenter and anchored the film's cast of fresh faces with Tom Atkins, star of Carpenter's The Fog (1980) and the Carpenter-produced Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982).

Shemping Corman University out of parts of USC and the campus of the California State University-Northridge, Dekker and his crew set up a soundstage inside the shell of an old Woolworth's department store and shot exteriors at the manmade Lake Castaic and Hollywood's Griffith Park Observatory, a popular film location with appearances in Rebel Without a Cause (1955), Teen-Age Crime Wave (1955), War of the Colossal Beast (1958), and The Terminator (1984). Zombie makeup effects were created for the film by Howard Berger, who would go on to found with Gregory Nicotero and Robert Kurtzman the KNB Efx Group, whose creations can be seen in such films as Scream (1996), Boogie Nights (1997), Kill Bill, Vol. 1-2 (2003-2004), The Mist (2007), and AMC's continuing, weekly zombie series The Walking Dead. Night of the Creeps was also an early credit for character actor David Paymer, who later went on to acclaim for his work in Quiz Show (1994), City Hall (1996), and Mr. Saturday Night (1992), for which he received an Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor.

A multiplex nonstarter in its day, Night of the Creeps was quickly remaindered onto video cassette, where it developed a cult following due to its party favorite pacing - an anything goes aesthetic that anticipated the juicy excess of Peter Jackson's Dead Alive (1992) and the recursive curlicues of Reservoir Dogs (1992) and Scream. Dekker's next at bat was the similarly nostalgic The Monster Squad (1987), which brought Dracula, the Frankenstein Monster, the Wolfman and other classic monsters into contemporary times. Cowritten with Shane Black, the film was another box-office failure that ultimately found favor on the home entertainment scene. Dekker's third and final film to date was RoboCop 3 (1993), the critically barracked second sequel to Paul Verhoeven's well-regarded original. That film's inability to recoup its $22,000,000 budget seemed to spell the end of days for Fred Dekker as a director-for-hire, though the filmmaker has felt vindicated by the attention and enthusiasm bestowed upon commemorative DVD releases of both Night of the Creeps and The Monster Squad and by sold-out cast and crew reunion screenings at the Alamo Draft House in Austin, Texas.

Producer: Charles Gordon
Director: Fred Dekker
Writer: Fred Dekker
Cinematographer: Robert C. New
Music: Barry De Vorzon
Editor: Michael N. Knue
Special effects makeup: Howard Berger
Cast: Jason Lively (Chris Romero), Steve Marshall (J. C. Hooper), Jill Whitlow (Cindy Cronenberg), Tom Atkins (Det. Ray Cameron), Wally Taylor (Det. Landis), Bruce Solomon (Sgt. Raimi), Vic Polizos (Coroner), Allan Kayser (Brad), Ken Heron (Johnny), Dick Miller (Walt), David Paymer (Young Scientist), Shane Black (Cop at Police Station), Robert Kurtzman (Beta Zombie), Howard Berger (Beta Zombie), Greg Nicotero (Extra).
C-88 min.

by Richard Harland Smith
Night Of The Creeps

Night of the Creeps

Growing up in the San Francisco Bay area during the early 1970s, Fred Dekker collected comic books, made amateur films, and indulged in a passion for classic monsters. At the age of 12, Dekker and a friend got to show off their homemade Planet of the Apes (1968) masks on Bob Wilkins' legendary Creature Features program on KTVU, where George Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) had its television debut. Eager to study film but rejected by the cinema departments of both University of California-Los Angeles and the University of Southern California, Dekker instead entered UCLA as an English major, where he fell in with a crowd that included future Hollywood screenwriters Shane Black (Lethal Weapon, 1987), Chris Matheson (Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure, 1989), and Ryan Rowe (Charlie's Angels, 2000). With another college roommate, Ethan Wiley, Dekker crafted the original story for the lighthearted horror lampoon House (1986), the success of which promoted Wiley to the director's chair for House II: The Second Story (1987) and Dekker to spearhead his feature film debut, Night of the Creeps (1986), released by TriStar Pictures in the summer of 1986. Though Dekker's concept for House had been a spare black-and-white psychological thriller influenced by William Friedkin's The Exorcist (1973), horror comedies were par for the course mid-decade. In competition, Dan O'Bannon's goofy, antic The Return of the Living Dead (1985) had bested George Romero's grim, lugubrious Day of the Dead (1985) and good-natured yuks were the soul of the plots of Gremlins (1984), Fright Night (1985), and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Part 2 (1986). Crafting his maiden voyage in the genre as an homage to the films and filmmakers who had inspired him, Dekker set the tongue-in-cheek but decidedly gnarly Night of the Creeps at the fictional Corman University, where extraterrestrial parasites have turned the student body into a legion of killer zombies. Tipping his hat to a host of influences, Dekker named characters after George Romero, David Cronenberg, John Landis, Tobe Hooper, Sam Raimi, and John Carpenter and anchored the film's cast of fresh faces with Tom Atkins, star of Carpenter's The Fog (1980) and the Carpenter-produced Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982). Shemping Corman University out of parts of USC and the campus of the California State University-Northridge, Dekker and his crew set up a soundstage inside the shell of an old Woolworth's department store and shot exteriors at the manmade Lake Castaic and Hollywood's Griffith Park Observatory, a popular film location with appearances in Rebel Without a Cause (1955), Teen-Age Crime Wave (1955), War of the Colossal Beast (1958), and The Terminator (1984). Zombie makeup effects were created for the film by Howard Berger, who would go on to found with Gregory Nicotero and Robert Kurtzman the KNB Efx Group, whose creations can be seen in such films as Scream (1996), Boogie Nights (1997), Kill Bill, Vol. 1-2 (2003-2004), The Mist (2007), and AMC's continuing, weekly zombie series The Walking Dead. Night of the Creeps was also an early credit for character actor David Paymer, who later went on to acclaim for his work in Quiz Show (1994), City Hall (1996), and Mr. Saturday Night (1992), for which he received an Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor. A multiplex nonstarter in its day, Night of the Creeps was quickly remaindered onto video cassette, where it developed a cult following due to its party favorite pacing - an anything goes aesthetic that anticipated the juicy excess of Peter Jackson's Dead Alive (1992) and the recursive curlicues of Reservoir Dogs (1992) and Scream. Dekker's next at bat was the similarly nostalgic The Monster Squad (1987), which brought Dracula, the Frankenstein Monster, the Wolfman and other classic monsters into contemporary times. Cowritten with Shane Black, the film was another box-office failure that ultimately found favor on the home entertainment scene. Dekker's third and final film to date was RoboCop 3 (1993), the critically barracked second sequel to Paul Verhoeven's well-regarded original. That film's inability to recoup its $22,000,000 budget seemed to spell the end of days for Fred Dekker as a director-for-hire, though the filmmaker has felt vindicated by the attention and enthusiasm bestowed upon commemorative DVD releases of both Night of the Creeps and The Monster Squad and by sold-out cast and crew reunion screenings at the Alamo Draft House in Austin, Texas. Producer: Charles Gordon Director: Fred Dekker Writer: Fred Dekker Cinematographer: Robert C. New Music: Barry De Vorzon Editor: Michael N. Knue Special effects makeup: Howard Berger Cast: Jason Lively (Chris Romero), Steve Marshall (J. C. Hooper), Jill Whitlow (Cindy Cronenberg), Tom Atkins (Det. Ray Cameron), Wally Taylor (Det. Landis), Bruce Solomon (Sgt. Raimi), Vic Polizos (Coroner), Allan Kayser (Brad), Ken Heron (Johnny), Dick Miller (Walt), David Paymer (Young Scientist), Shane Black (Cop at Police Station), Robert Kurtzman (Beta Zombie), Howard Berger (Beta Zombie), Greg Nicotero (Extra). C-88 min. by Richard Harland Smith

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 22, 1986

Todd-AO

Released in United States Summer August 22, 1986