Night Club Scandal


1h 10m 1937
Night Club Scandal

Brief Synopsis

Dr. Ernest Tindal kills his wife and plants clues pointing to her lover, Frank Marsh. Vera, Frank's sister, enlists the aid or reporter Russell Kirk in proving the innocence of her brother. Detective McKinley thinks that gangster Jack Reed is involved and shoots Reed when he attempts to escape. Reed gets away but goes to Dr. Tindal for treatment of his wound and Tindal kills him on the operating table. Kirk has uncovered some new evidence and confronts Tindal with it.

Film Details

Also Known As
City Hall Scandal
Release Date
Nov 19, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Riddle Me This by Daniel N. Rubin (New York, 25 Feb 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

Dr. Ernest Tindal murders his wife Ruth, who has been having an affair, then goes out for the evening. In the hallway he meets his friend, and they can hear what sounds like his wife playing the piano, thus Tindal has created a perfect alibi. On the night of the murder, Ruth's lover Frank Marlan, who had a rendezvous with Ruth, finds her body lying on the floor of her apartment. At the sound of approaching voices, Frank panics and runs, after leaving his fingerprints on a doorknob. The case is investigated by Captain McKinley and his reporter friend, Russell Kirk, who are always in competition for the same woman. Kirk instantly determines that the murder involves infidelity, and the fingerprints lead them to the Marlan home. Kirk meets Frank's sister Vera, and immediately falls in love with her. She is unable to provide her brother with an alibi when Kirk remembers seeing her leave a nightclub alone the night of the murder. Julia and Jack Reed, notorious gangsters, also try to vouch for Frank, but botch their alibi, after which Frank is convicted and sentenced to execution. Kirk's attraction to Vera leads him to help her try to get an appeal, but the governor refuses. During a fight with McKinley, in which McKinley tries to strangle him, Kirk realizes Frank must be innocent, because Ruth would have grabbed her assailant's wrists, just as he grabbed McKinley's wrists during the struggle. Frank was arrested because his watch charm was found in Ruth's hand and was used as evidence against him, however, watch charms rest on the midriff, not the wrists. They immediately suspect the Reeds, but Tindal tips the Reeds off and they escape. Jack is shot by McKinley, however, and Julia calls Tindal to their hideout to save him. Knowing that Jack is the only witness to the murder because Jack stole the watch charm for him, Tindal kills Jack, then tells Vera that he died from his injury. Distraught, Julia attempts to kill McKinley at headquarters, but fails. A coroner reports that Jack died at the hands of his surgeon, and all realize that Tindal must be guilty. They stop Tindal, who was nonchalantly dressing to attend Frank's execution, and Kirk reveals that his investigation proves that Tindal bought a player piano shortly before his wife's death. He used this to form his alibi that Ruth was alive when he left on the eve of her murder. By attaching a length of paper to the music sheet, the piano had a delay before it began playing. A stay of execution is granted for Frank, and Tindal is arrested. Vera expresses her thanks to Kirk for his assistance, but to his dismay, she is already engaged to someone else.

Film Details

Also Known As
City Hall Scandal
Release Date
Nov 19, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Riddle Me This by Daniel N. Rubin (New York, 25 Feb 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of the film was City Hall Scandal. A contemporary news item in Box Office gives Harold Hurley producing credit, however, the Screen Achievements Bulletin credits William Lackey as producer. This is a remake of Paramount's 1932 film, Guilty as Hell.