Night and Day


2h 8m 1946
Night and Day

Brief Synopsis

Fanciful biography of songwriter Cole Porter, who rose from high society to find success on Tin Pan Alley.

Photos & Videos

Night and Day - Scene Stills
Night and Day - Jane Wyman Publicity Stills

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Musical
Biography
Release Date
Aug 3, 1946
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 26 Jul 1946
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Universal City--Providencia Ranch, California, United States; Warner Bros. Ranch, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 8m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Yale University law student Cole Porter's studies suffer because of his interest in the theater. During the 1914 Christmas holidays, Cole travels home to Indiana with his sympathetic law professor, Monty Woolley, and his friend, Ward Blackburn. Also visiting the Porter home are Cole's cousin Nancy and her roommate, the well-to-do Linda Lee. At home, Cole tells his disapproving grandfather Omer that he does not intend to return to Yale, but will instead try to earn a living as a songwriter. Upon returning to the city, Cole and Monty put together a theatrical show called See America First , starring Cole's friend, Gracie Harris. Nancy, Ward and Linda are in the audience on opening night, but Cole's mother remains in Indiana with his grandfather, who refuses to come. The Lusitania is sunk by the Germans the same night, and Cole's show closes after one performance. Cole then joins the French army and is injured. While recuperating in a French hospital, he encounters Linda, who is working there as a nurse. In an effort to ease Cole's despondency, Linda buys a piano for the hospital and Cole recovers enough to write "Night and Day." Linda proposes that Cole join her in a villa on the Riviera, and although Cole loves Linda, he explains that he does not want to take her money anymore than he wanted to take his family's money and intends to return to America to work on his own. In New York, Cole takes a job playing the piano in a music store. Tired of trying to sell the same old songs, Cole's partner, singer Carole Hill, sings one of his compositions, and encouraged by its warm reception, Cole and Monty, who is now working as an actor, produce another show, The New Yorkers . This show is an enormous hit, as is Cole's following show. Eventually Cole is offered the opportunity to write a show in England. There he once again meets Linda, whom he has never stopped loving, and they marry. Immediately after the wedding, Cole and Linda return to New York, where Cole goes into production on yet another show. Cole continues to promise Linda that they will take a trip together, but as soon as one show is completed, he begins another. Finally, Linda becomes tired of Cole's promises and leaves for Europe alone. When Cole's mother telephones with the news that his grandfather is dying, Cole immediately flies to Indiana, and before Omer dies, he and Cole are reconciled. A disheartened Cole stays on in Indiana and, during a storm, is severely injured when he is thrown by a horse. The injury aggravates Cole's war wounds, and he loses the use of his legs. Before he undergoes a long series of operations, Cole forbids Monty to tell Linda about his injury. Later, Cole attends a tribute at Yale. Monty arranges for Linda to surprise him there, and the couple is reunited.

Cast

Cary Grant

Cole Porter

Alexis Smith

Linda Lee Porter

Monty Woolley

Himself

Ginny Simms

Carole Hill

Jane Wyman

Gracie Harris

Eve Arden

Gabrielle

Victor Francen

Anatole Giron

Alan Hale

Leon Dowling

Dorothy Malone

Nancy

Tom D'andrea

Bernie

Selena Royle

Kate Porter

Donald Woods

Wardrobe Blackburn

Henry Stephenson

Omer Porter

Paul Cavanagh

Bart McClelland

Sig Ruman

Wilowsky

Carlos Ramirez

Specialty singer

Milada Mladova

Specialty dancer

Estelle Sloan

Specialty dancer

George Zoritch

Specialty dancer

Adam Digatano

Specialty

Jayne Digatano

Specialty

Mary Martin

Herself

Jimmie Dodd

Student

John Compton

Student

Boyd Davis

Dean

Frank Dae

Professor

Boyd Irwin

Professor

Sam Flint

Professor

Charles Miller

Professor

John Miles

Student

Art Kassel

Student

Paul Garkie

Student

Laddie Rucker

Student

John Alvin

Petey

Harlan Briggs

Doorman

Harry Seymour

Clarence, piano player

Clarence Muse

Caleb

Jo Ann Marlowe

Tina

Regina Wallace

Tina's mother

Frank Ferguson

Tina's father

George Meader

Minister

Virginia Sale

Minister's wife

Bertha Woolford

Servant

Armba Dandridge

Servant

Gregory Muradian

Small caroler

Lisa Golm

Foreigner

Ernest Golm

Foreigner

John Goldsworthy

Yale gentleman

Garry Owen

Bartender

Henry Hastings

Bartender

Louis Gasnier

Bartender

Crane Whitley

Commercial artist

Lynne Baggett

Sexy woman

Rebel Randall

Chorus girl

Arlyne Roberts

Chorus girl

Paula Drew

Specialty trio member

Pat Clark

Specialty trio member

Jane Harker

Specialty trio member

Creighton Hale

Man in theater

Frank Elliott

Man in theater

Paul Gustine

Man in theater

Bob Mckenzie

Hansom cab driver

Alan Schute

English officer

Bill Nind

English officer

Eric Wilton

English officer

Edgar Caldwell

American officer

George Volk

American officer

Allen Marston

American officer

Leon Lenoir

French officer

Mischa Panaieff

French officer

Pierre Duval

French officer

Ellen Lowe

Nurse

Joan Winfield

Nurse

Ruth Matthews

Nurse

Betty Blair

Nurse

Valerie Ardis

Nurse

Edna Morris

Nurse

Paula Mae

Nurse

Eva Novak

Nurse

Emile Kilb

Orchestra leader

Bernard Deroux

Assistant to Giron

Marie Melesh

Scrub woman

Adrian Dooshout

Man at bar

Rene Mimieux

Man at bar

Fred Dosh

French waiter

Maurice Brierre

French waiter

Albert Petit

French waiter

Frank Marlowe

Army driver

Rune Hultman

American lieutenant

Peter Camlin

French lieutenant

George Riley

O'Halloran

Fern Emmett

Secretary

Dick Erdman

Young customer

Robert Arthur

Young customer

Caren Marsh

Young customer

Patsy Harmon

Young customer

Dorothy Reisner

Young customer

Claire Meade

Customer

Charles Williams

Customer

Mayo Newhall

Bearded man

George Nokes

Wardrobe Blackburn, as a child

Gordon Richards

Cochran

Laura Treadwell

Woman in theater

Howard Freeman

Producer

Bobby Watson

Director

Philip Van Zandt

Librettist

Harry Crocker

Newspaperman

John "red" Pierson

1st "Peaches"

Herman Bing

2nd "Peaches"

Tom Herbert

Drunk

Gladys Turney

Society woman

Chester Clute

Music publisher

Dick Bartell

Photographer

Joyce Compton

Chorine

Helen O'hara

Chorine

Susanne Rosser

Chorine

Louis Quince

Man in couple

Marion Gray

Woman in couple

Rudy Friml

Orchestra leader

Willis Claire

Man in couple

Leota Lorraine

Woman in couple

Eddie Kelly

Callboy

Helen Pender

Pretty nurse

William A. Boardway

Surgeon

Jack Richardson

Surgeon

Tom Mcguire

Surgeon

Ed Biby

Surgeon

Laurie Sherman

Intern

Hobart Cavanaugh

Man in hospital corridor

Almira Sessions

Woman in hospital corridor

Gene Garrick

Soldier

Jack Chefe

Headwaiter

Eddie Kane

Headwaiter

Hans Herbert

Headwaiter

Wheaton Chambers

Assistant headwaiter

Henry Desoto

Waiter

George Suzanne

Waiter

Nick Stewart

Waiter

Jacqueline Milo

French girl

Skelton Knaggs

Newspaper vendor

George Kirby

Cab driver

Wally Scott

Chauffeur

Colin Kenny

Doorman

Herbert Evans

Bobby

Mike Lally

Doctor

Gladden James

Doctor

Dick Earle

Doctor

J. M. Johnstone

Doctor

Buddy Gorman

English page boy

Harold Debecker

English workman

Jack Mower

Livery chauffeur

Elizabeth Valentine

Matron in hospital

Cyril Ring

Husband

Vivian Oakland

Wife

Pat Gleason

Dance director

Don Roy

Band leader

Barbara Slater

Tall showgirl

Gloria Anderson

Tall showgirl

Ruth Costello

Twin in dance team

Dorothy Costello

Twin in dance team

George Boyce

Stage manager

Fred Deming

Guest

Bert Moorhouse

Yale alumnus

Marshall Ruth

Yale alumnus

Fred Santley

Yale alumnus

Joe Kirkwood

Cole Porter's classmate

Gene Stanley

Cole Porter's classmate

John Vosper

Crew

Milton Ager

Composer

Gene Alden

Stand-in for Donald Woods

Gerald W. Alexander

Re-rec and Effects mixer

Milo Anderson

Wardrobe

Fred Applegate

Screenplay clerk

Miriam Bellah

Stand-in for Dorothy Malone

Diane Bernard

Stand-in for Jane Wyman

Lester H. Blackburn

Gaffer

William Bowers

Screenwriter

Everett A. Brown

Sound

Herschel Brown

Grip

Jean Burk

Hairstylist

Robert Burks

Special Effects

Dudley Chambers

Vocal Arrangements

Herschel Daugherty

Dialogue Director

Paul Detlefsen

Matte paintings

Rex Dewitt

Stand-in for Monty Wooley

Betty Dietrich

Stand-in for Alexis Smith

Leonard Doss

Associate (Color)

George Dye

Technicolor tech

Leo F. Forbstein

Music Director

Charles David Forrest

Music mixer

David Forrest

Sound

Jack Fresholtz

Stills gaffer

Bert Glennon

Director of Photography

Ida Greenfield

Wardrobe

Frank Heath

Assistant Director

Ray Heindorf

Prod numbers orch and Conductor

Charles Hoffman

Screenwriter

John Hughes

Art Director

Natalie Kalmus

Technicolor col Director

Cliff King

Stills

Mario Larrinaga

Matte paintings

James Leicester

Montage

Pat Malone

Stand-in for Henry Stephenson

Peverell Marley

Director of Photography

Armor Marlowe

Set Decoration

Wiley Martin

Assistant Camera

William Mcgann

Special Effects

Mel Merrihugh

Stand-in for Cary Grant

Jack Moffitt

Adaptation

George Nogle

Camera Operator

Herbert Plews

Props

Cole Porter

Composer

Jean Porter

Stand-in for Selena Royle

Norman Pringle

Makeup

Leroy Prinz

Dance nos created and Director

Roe Ramsey

Wardrobe

Leon Roberts

Wardrobe

Arthur Schwartz

Producer

Clair Sealey

Best boy

Sue Shannon

Wardrobe

William V. Skall

Director of Photography

Harvey L. Slocomb

Technicolor Assistant Camera

Eric Stacey

Unit Manager

Max Steiner

Addl Music comp and Adapted

Leo Townsend

Screenwriter

Travilla

Dance Costume Designer

Robert Turner

Props

Robert Vreeland

Assistant Director

Jack L. Warner

Executive Producer

Robert G. Wayne

Re-rec and Effects mixer

David Weisbart

Film Editor

Perc Westmore

Makeup Artist

Jack Yellen

Composer

Photo Collections

Night and Day - Scene Stills
Here are a few scene stills from Night and Day (1946), starring Cary Grant as songwriter Cole Porter.
Night and Day - Jane Wyman Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity photos featuring Jane Wyman, taken to publicize Night and Day (1946).

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Musical
Biography
Release Date
Aug 3, 1946
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 26 Jul 1946
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Universal City--Providencia Ranch, California, United States; Warner Bros. Ranch, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 8m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Score

1946

Articles

Night and Day


"Night and Day, you are the one; / Only you beneath the moon and under the sun." These opening lyrics to Cole Porter's pop music standard, "Night and Day," could very well describe Porter himself. He stood high atop the pantheon of American popular music as one of its supreme composers and lyricists. And the film biography, Night and Day (1946), reminds us of a time in America when composers and songwriters were as famous and revered as the music video celebrities of today. During the 20th century, arguably the most creative period in American popular music, music fans were treated to the songs of such gifted artists as Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Jimmy McHugh, Hoagy Carmichael, Richard Rodgers and the Gershwins. But none of them received more accolades than Cole Porter.

Night and Day professes to give us the true story of Cole Porter; but in reality, it's just a grand showcase for Cole Porter's most famous tunes. Seamless set pieces shot in vivid Technicolor are highlighted by dazzling dance numbers and glamorous fashions, but music is always at the center of everything. Some of the highlights include Cary Grant and Ginny Simms performing a medley of Porter's songs originally introduced on Broadway by Ethel Merman. And, yes, Cary holds his own, especially while warbling, "You're the Top." There's a bright and colorful song and dance mini-operetta performed to "Begin the Beguine." And the inimitable Mary Martin reprises her polite striptease number, "My Heart Belongs to Daddy." She initially introduced the tune in the Broadway musical, Leave it to Me (1938). Some of the other songs featured in Night and Day are popular favorites like "I've Got You Under my Skin," "I Get a Kick Out of You," "Let's Do It," and "What Is This Thing Called Love." This elegant collection of tunes seems to summarize Porter's sensual approach to life: lush, rhythmic melodies with witty and sometimes risqu¿yrics.

Born into wealth in Indiana, Porter had to struggle very little in his chosen career, but his health was a different matter; he suffered physical hardships and was subjected to over thirty operations in his lifetime. His near crippling leg injuries he supposedly attributed from time to time to his stint with the French Army during World War One. However, most biographers claim that Porter had a creative imagination and that all of his injuries were acquired as a result of a horse falling on him. In actuality he was never a soldier in the French Army, but a member of a relief organization in France during the war, where he spent most of his time organizing and enjoying an endless series of parties. And of course, because Night and Day was made in 1946, there is no mention of Porter's homosexuality or of his actual "war" experiences. Nor was there any hint that his marriage to older divorcee, Linda Howard, was strictly a marriage of convenience. The fact that Linda's ex-husband had been abusive and that Cole was gay made their business-like marriage more agreeable to both. Yet, Linda was always one of Porter's chief supporters, both spiritually and financially, until her death in 1954. Unfortunately, Cole Porter's last years were not happy ones. He finally had to have one of his legs amputated in 1958, and after that he led a lonely and reclusive life. In 1960 Yale honored him with a honorary doctorate. He died in October of 1964 at the age of 72, leaving behind a rich, voluminous musical legacy.

Night and Day was Cary Grant's first film in color, and it gave him a chance to strut in what is essentially a musical. He had turned down all other opportunities to work that year before deciding to do the Porter biography. At the time, his marriage to Barbara Hutton was breaking up and in one last effort to patch things up, he had taken an extended "home vacation" in an attempt to revive his relationship with his heiress wife. However, this did little to keep the two of them from growing apart, especially after Barbara's son, Lance, was taken from the Grant home by his biological father. Feeling isolated and alone, Grant finally decided to immerse himself in acting once again, and agreed to play Cole Porter in Night and Day after repeated encouragements from the actual composer.

Although he hadn't worked in a year, and was suffering from the effects of marital discord, Grant was still able to stir up excitement on the set. Co-star Alexis Smith, who plays Linda Howard, had a fond memory of doing her first scene in the movie with Grant, one in which she and Grant were to kiss one another while standing under some mistletoe. As she remembers in Evenings With Cary Grant: Recollections in His Own Words and by Those Who Knew Him Best by Nancy Nelson, "The line following the kiss was mine. Well, when we came out of the kiss and I looked at him, I couldn't remember my name, much less my line...I was in a state of shock. It hadn't been very long since I'd been a schoolgirl, sitting in the balcony at Saturday matinees on Hollywood Boulevard, swooning over Cary Grant."

Not all the memories from making Night and Day were pleasant ones. Being a perfectionist by nature, Grant created some problems on the set. According to Charles Higham and Roy Moseley in Cary Grant: The Lonely Heart, Grant caused difficulties for the makeup staff and felt little rapport with director Michael Curtiz, the same man who had directed Casablanca (1942) and had earned the reputation as a stern taskmaster. Grant also had a problem with the script, which would undergo many changes; several of them initiated by Grant. He complained about dialogue, characterizations and even the most minute details of the studio sets. According to Higham and Moseley's book, Alexis Smith remembers Grant reprimanding Curtiz concerning a shirt that Grant was asked to wear: "Do you see these cuffs? There's a quarter of an inch showing. It should be an eighth of an inch." This could sound like someone using his power for petty purposes. But to Smith this wasn't just some celebrity taking advantage of his stardom, this was a fine actor who was totally dedicated to his art and craft. As she later recounted, "I would rather have him be fussy about a quarter of an inch on a cuff and give the performance he did, because it was that care and attention that carried him through everything he did. His acting wasn't an eighth of an inch off."

Still, there were additional problems during the making of Night and Day. Monty Woolley suffered from a severe bladder problem; the cameraman, Bert Glennon, walked off the set when he overheard Curtiz criticizing his daily rushes; and an oppressive heat wave lowered the morale of almost everyone involved. Yet, despite all the problems, Night and Day opened to long lines at the box office. According to Warren G. Harris in Cary Grant, A Touch of Elegance, "In a period when the average movie ticket cost forty-one cents, Warner Brothers earned four million dollars in rentals." It was Grant's biggest moneymaker up to that time.

Producer: Arthur Schwartz
Director: Michael Curtiz
Screenplay: Jack Moffitt, Leo Townsend, William Bowers, Charles Hoffman
Costume Design: Milo Anderson, Travilla
Cinematography: J. Peverell Marley, William V. Skall
Editing: David Weisbart
Music: Max Steiner
Art Direction: John Hughes
Cast: Cary Grant (Cole Porter), Alexis Smith (Linda Lee Porter), Monty Woolley (as himself), Ginny Simms (Carole Hill), Jane Wyman (Gracie Harris), Eve Arden (Gabrielle), Alan Hale (Leon Dowling), Dorothy Malone (Nancy), Victor Francen (Anatole Giron), Tom D'Andrea (Bernie), Henry Stephenson (Omar Cole).
C-129m. Closed captioning.

by Joseph D'Onofrio
Night And Day

Night and Day

"Night and Day, you are the one; / Only you beneath the moon and under the sun." These opening lyrics to Cole Porter's pop music standard, "Night and Day," could very well describe Porter himself. He stood high atop the pantheon of American popular music as one of its supreme composers and lyricists. And the film biography, Night and Day (1946), reminds us of a time in America when composers and songwriters were as famous and revered as the music video celebrities of today. During the 20th century, arguably the most creative period in American popular music, music fans were treated to the songs of such gifted artists as Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Jimmy McHugh, Hoagy Carmichael, Richard Rodgers and the Gershwins. But none of them received more accolades than Cole Porter. Night and Day professes to give us the true story of Cole Porter; but in reality, it's just a grand showcase for Cole Porter's most famous tunes. Seamless set pieces shot in vivid Technicolor are highlighted by dazzling dance numbers and glamorous fashions, but music is always at the center of everything. Some of the highlights include Cary Grant and Ginny Simms performing a medley of Porter's songs originally introduced on Broadway by Ethel Merman. And, yes, Cary holds his own, especially while warbling, "You're the Top." There's a bright and colorful song and dance mini-operetta performed to "Begin the Beguine." And the inimitable Mary Martin reprises her polite striptease number, "My Heart Belongs to Daddy." She initially introduced the tune in the Broadway musical, Leave it to Me (1938). Some of the other songs featured in Night and Day are popular favorites like "I've Got You Under my Skin," "I Get a Kick Out of You," "Let's Do It," and "What Is This Thing Called Love." This elegant collection of tunes seems to summarize Porter's sensual approach to life: lush, rhythmic melodies with witty and sometimes risqu¿yrics. Born into wealth in Indiana, Porter had to struggle very little in his chosen career, but his health was a different matter; he suffered physical hardships and was subjected to over thirty operations in his lifetime. His near crippling leg injuries he supposedly attributed from time to time to his stint with the French Army during World War One. However, most biographers claim that Porter had a creative imagination and that all of his injuries were acquired as a result of a horse falling on him. In actuality he was never a soldier in the French Army, but a member of a relief organization in France during the war, where he spent most of his time organizing and enjoying an endless series of parties. And of course, because Night and Day was made in 1946, there is no mention of Porter's homosexuality or of his actual "war" experiences. Nor was there any hint that his marriage to older divorcee, Linda Howard, was strictly a marriage of convenience. The fact that Linda's ex-husband had been abusive and that Cole was gay made their business-like marriage more agreeable to both. Yet, Linda was always one of Porter's chief supporters, both spiritually and financially, until her death in 1954. Unfortunately, Cole Porter's last years were not happy ones. He finally had to have one of his legs amputated in 1958, and after that he led a lonely and reclusive life. In 1960 Yale honored him with a honorary doctorate. He died in October of 1964 at the age of 72, leaving behind a rich, voluminous musical legacy. Night and Day was Cary Grant's first film in color, and it gave him a chance to strut in what is essentially a musical. He had turned down all other opportunities to work that year before deciding to do the Porter biography. At the time, his marriage to Barbara Hutton was breaking up and in one last effort to patch things up, he had taken an extended "home vacation" in an attempt to revive his relationship with his heiress wife. However, this did little to keep the two of them from growing apart, especially after Barbara's son, Lance, was taken from the Grant home by his biological father. Feeling isolated and alone, Grant finally decided to immerse himself in acting once again, and agreed to play Cole Porter in Night and Day after repeated encouragements from the actual composer. Although he hadn't worked in a year, and was suffering from the effects of marital discord, Grant was still able to stir up excitement on the set. Co-star Alexis Smith, who plays Linda Howard, had a fond memory of doing her first scene in the movie with Grant, one in which she and Grant were to kiss one another while standing under some mistletoe. As she remembers in Evenings With Cary Grant: Recollections in His Own Words and by Those Who Knew Him Best by Nancy Nelson, "The line following the kiss was mine. Well, when we came out of the kiss and I looked at him, I couldn't remember my name, much less my line...I was in a state of shock. It hadn't been very long since I'd been a schoolgirl, sitting in the balcony at Saturday matinees on Hollywood Boulevard, swooning over Cary Grant." Not all the memories from making Night and Day were pleasant ones. Being a perfectionist by nature, Grant created some problems on the set. According to Charles Higham and Roy Moseley in Cary Grant: The Lonely Heart, Grant caused difficulties for the makeup staff and felt little rapport with director Michael Curtiz, the same man who had directed Casablanca (1942) and had earned the reputation as a stern taskmaster. Grant also had a problem with the script, which would undergo many changes; several of them initiated by Grant. He complained about dialogue, characterizations and even the most minute details of the studio sets. According to Higham and Moseley's book, Alexis Smith remembers Grant reprimanding Curtiz concerning a shirt that Grant was asked to wear: "Do you see these cuffs? There's a quarter of an inch showing. It should be an eighth of an inch." This could sound like someone using his power for petty purposes. But to Smith this wasn't just some celebrity taking advantage of his stardom, this was a fine actor who was totally dedicated to his art and craft. As she later recounted, "I would rather have him be fussy about a quarter of an inch on a cuff and give the performance he did, because it was that care and attention that carried him through everything he did. His acting wasn't an eighth of an inch off." Still, there were additional problems during the making of Night and Day. Monty Woolley suffered from a severe bladder problem; the cameraman, Bert Glennon, walked off the set when he overheard Curtiz criticizing his daily rushes; and an oppressive heat wave lowered the morale of almost everyone involved. Yet, despite all the problems, Night and Day opened to long lines at the box office. According to Warren G. Harris in Cary Grant, A Touch of Elegance, "In a period when the average movie ticket cost forty-one cents, Warner Brothers earned four million dollars in rentals." It was Grant's biggest moneymaker up to that time. Producer: Arthur Schwartz Director: Michael Curtiz Screenplay: Jack Moffitt, Leo Townsend, William Bowers, Charles Hoffman Costume Design: Milo Anderson, Travilla Cinematography: J. Peverell Marley, William V. Skall Editing: David Weisbart Music: Max Steiner Art Direction: John Hughes Cast: Cary Grant (Cole Porter), Alexis Smith (Linda Lee Porter), Monty Woolley (as himself), Ginny Simms (Carole Hill), Jane Wyman (Gracie Harris), Eve Arden (Gabrielle), Alan Hale (Leon Dowling), Dorothy Malone (Nancy), Victor Francen (Anatole Giron), Tom D'Andrea (Bernie), Henry Stephenson (Omar Cole). C-129m. Closed captioning. by Joseph D'Onofrio

Cary Grant: The Signature Collection


Five Cary Grant DVD Debuts from Warner Home Video

Warner Home Video (WHV) is proud to celebrate Cary Grant's centennial with the Signature Collection DVD debut of five films from Hollywood's acclaimed screen legend whose gallantry and courtly charm spanned an illustrious career of 76 films. This collection includes Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer, My Favorite Wife, Destination Tokyo and Night and Day. Each of the DVDs includes the extra bonus features

. "Grant was indeed Hollywood's quintessential leading man," says George Feltenstein, WHH's Senior Vice President Classic Catalog. "Equally comfortable at comedy or drama, his popularity is unwavering and is still the standard by which romantic, sophisticated leading men are judged."

Once told by an interviewer "Everybody would like to be Cary Grant," Grant is said to have replied: "So would I." Born Archibald Leach in Bristol, England, on January 18, 1904, Grant left school at 14 to join the Bob Pender Troupe of knockabout comedians touring the English provinces. In 1920, Grant first came to America when the troupe appeared on Broadway in Good Times.

In 1933, Mae West picked Grant for She Done Him Wrong and I'm No Angel and his movie career was off and running. In the late '30s, Grant became one of the first stars to work as a "free agent," making films for multiple studios including MGM, Columbia and RKO. In 1936, he first teamed with Katharine Hepburn and director George Cukor for Sylvia Scarlett, the initial film to fully demonstrate Grant's inspired comic flair. Among the films that followed were The Awful Truth, Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday, Topper, Philadelphia Story, Suspicion, Arsenic and Old Lace and None but the Lonely Heart, for which he won an Oscar® nomination. In 1970, the actor was given a special Academy Award® for career achievement.

Notably, Grant appeared in four of Alfred Hitchcock's best films, including the romantic thrillers North by Northwes with Eva Marie Saint; Notorious opposite Ingrid Bergman; Suspicion opposite Joan Fontaine and To Catch A Thief with Grace Kelly. Seemingly growing more handsome and charming as he got older, Grant retained his star status into the 1960s, appearing in such box-office hits as Operation Petticoat and Charade. He retired from the screen in 1966, but spent the next twenty years in the public eye, as a board member for companies such as Faberge, MGM and Hollywood Park. Despite constant offers, Grant refused to return to the screen, although he did consent to a series of retrospective Q&A evenings across America with his beloved fans. He enjoyed the experiences immeasurably, as did the audiences. It was in Davenport, Iowa while rehearsing for one of these "in-person" events that Cary Grant suffered a sudden stroke and died on November 29, 1986.

The Films in Cary Grant: The Signature Collection

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House - Goodbye city life; hello Connecticut, with plenty of laugh stops along the way. This movie classic - named by AFI as one of America's 100 Funniest Movies - about the frustrations and joys of building and owning a home features Grant as a New York ad exec who's taken on the task of building a house from the ground up. Will he lose everything, including his sanity, or become a happy suburban homeowner? Myrna Loy, as his extremely patient wife and Melvyn Douglas join in the fun.

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House will have the following extra content:
· Two Radio Productions:
- October 10, 1949 LUX Radio Theatre Broadcast starring Grant and Irene Dunne
- June 9, 1950 Screen Directors Playhouse Broadcast starring Grant and (his then-wife) Betsy Drake
· "The House of Tomorrow" Classic M-G-M Tex Avery Cartoon
· Cary Grant Trailer Gallery
· Theatrical Trailer

The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer - 1947 Academy Award® winner for Best Original Screenplay (by Sidney Sheldon), the film stars Cary Grant with Myrna Loy and a teen-aged Shirley Temple. In this very entertaining romantic comedy, Grant plays Richard Nugent, a bachelor minding his own business who finds a love-sick girl (Shirley Temple) asleep on his couch. The older sister of the teen is a Judge (Myrna Loy), and she "sentences" Nugent to go out with the bobby-soxer until she is no longer infatuated.

The extra features included on the DVD are:
· June 13, 1949 LUX Radio theatre Radio Production starring Grant and Temple
· "Little Tinker" Classic Tex Avery M-G-M cartoon
· Cary Grant Trailer Gallery
· Theatrical Trailer

My Favorite Wife - Grant skillfully plays the romantic hunk and the comedic buffoon in this movie about marital mix-ups. Nick Arden (Grant) is on his way to the honeymoon suite with his new bride (Gail Patrick) when he runs into the wife (Irene Dunne) who was lost at sea and presumed dead seven years ago. The marriage knots have to be untied as the real Mrs. Arden steps up to claim her husband in this quirky romance filled with high jinks and big laughs.

My Favorite Wife will contain the following bonus content:
· Vintage M-G-M Robert Benchley short subject "Home Movies"
· December 7, 1949 Screen Director¿s Playhouse Radio Production starring Grant and Dunne
· Theatrical Trailer

Destination Tokyo - Grant is a military hero in this action-filled war drama. As Captain Cassidy, Grant pilots the U.S. submarine Copperfin through the dangerous waters of the enemy's front yard. Delmer Daves makes his directorial debut with this film that critics say remains "a classic war drama." This is the only military drama Grant made during World War II.

Destination Tokyo will contain these bonus features:
· Warner Bros. WWII short: "Gem of the Ocean"
· Cary Grant Trailer Gallery
· Theatrical Trailer

Night And Day - Appearing in his first Technicolor motion picture, Grant portrays Cole Porter, the legendary, sophisticated songwriter whose life was marked by triumph and tragedy. He's joined by a superb cast including Alexis Smith, Jane Wyman, Eve Arden and Monty Woolley as himself. The film contains more than 20 of Porter's songs which have been enjoyed by many generations over the years. One of the film's most famous moments is Mary Martin re-creating her Broadway performance of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy," the show-stopper that made her an overnight star. Even Cary gets into the act singing "You're the Top" with `40s chanteuse Ginny Simms. Interestingly, Hollywood is once again bringing Porter's life to the screen later this year, with Kevin Kline portraying the composer in Irwin Winkler's film "DeLovely."

The extra content in Night And Day will be:
· Vintage Warner Bros. Shorts: Desi Arnaz and His Orchestra and "Musical Movieland"
· Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd in "The Big Snooze" a classic Looney Tunes cartoon
· Cole Porter Trailer Gallery

Each DVD will be presented in a format preserving the aspect ratio of its original theatrical exhibition and will include subtitles in English, French and Spanish. All except The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer are in Dual-Layer format.

To order Cary Grant: The Signature Collection, click here. Explore more Cary Grant titles here.

Cary Grant: The Signature Collection

Five Cary Grant DVD Debuts from Warner Home Video Warner Home Video (WHV) is proud to celebrate Cary Grant's centennial with the Signature Collection DVD debut of five films from Hollywood's acclaimed screen legend whose gallantry and courtly charm spanned an illustrious career of 76 films. This collection includes Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer, My Favorite Wife, Destination Tokyo and Night and Day. Each of the DVDs includes the extra bonus features. "Grant was indeed Hollywood's quintessential leading man," says George Feltenstein, WHH's Senior Vice President Classic Catalog. "Equally comfortable at comedy or drama, his popularity is unwavering and is still the standard by which romantic, sophisticated leading men are judged." Once told by an interviewer "Everybody would like to be Cary Grant," Grant is said to have replied: "So would I." Born Archibald Leach in Bristol, England, on January 18, 1904, Grant left school at 14 to join the Bob Pender Troupe of knockabout comedians touring the English provinces. In 1920, Grant first came to America when the troupe appeared on Broadway in Good Times. In 1933, Mae West picked Grant for She Done Him Wrong and I'm No Angel and his movie career was off and running. In the late '30s, Grant became one of the first stars to work as a "free agent," making films for multiple studios including MGM, Columbia and RKO. In 1936, he first teamed with Katharine Hepburn and director George Cukor for Sylvia Scarlett, the initial film to fully demonstrate Grant's inspired comic flair. Among the films that followed were The Awful Truth, Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday, Topper, Philadelphia Story, Suspicion, Arsenic and Old Lace and None but the Lonely Heart, for which he won an Oscar® nomination. In 1970, the actor was given a special Academy Award® for career achievement. Notably, Grant appeared in four of Alfred Hitchcock's best films, including the romantic thrillers North by Northwes with Eva Marie Saint; Notorious opposite Ingrid Bergman; Suspicion opposite Joan Fontaine and To Catch A Thief with Grace Kelly. Seemingly growing more handsome and charming as he got older, Grant retained his star status into the 1960s, appearing in such box-office hits as Operation Petticoat and Charade. He retired from the screen in 1966, but spent the next twenty years in the public eye, as a board member for companies such as Faberge, MGM and Hollywood Park. Despite constant offers, Grant refused to return to the screen, although he did consent to a series of retrospective Q&A evenings across America with his beloved fans. He enjoyed the experiences immeasurably, as did the audiences. It was in Davenport, Iowa while rehearsing for one of these "in-person" events that Cary Grant suffered a sudden stroke and died on November 29, 1986. The Films in Cary Grant: The Signature Collection Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House - Goodbye city life; hello Connecticut, with plenty of laugh stops along the way. This movie classic - named by AFI as one of America's 100 Funniest Movies - about the frustrations and joys of building and owning a home features Grant as a New York ad exec who's taken on the task of building a house from the ground up. Will he lose everything, including his sanity, or become a happy suburban homeowner? Myrna Loy, as his extremely patient wife and Melvyn Douglas join in the fun. Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House will have the following extra content: · Two Radio Productions: - October 10, 1949 LUX Radio Theatre Broadcast starring Grant and Irene Dunne - June 9, 1950 Screen Directors Playhouse Broadcast starring Grant and (his then-wife) Betsy Drake · "The House of Tomorrow" Classic M-G-M Tex Avery Cartoon · Cary Grant Trailer Gallery · Theatrical Trailer The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer - 1947 Academy Award® winner for Best Original Screenplay (by Sidney Sheldon), the film stars Cary Grant with Myrna Loy and a teen-aged Shirley Temple. In this very entertaining romantic comedy, Grant plays Richard Nugent, a bachelor minding his own business who finds a love-sick girl (Shirley Temple) asleep on his couch. The older sister of the teen is a Judge (Myrna Loy), and she "sentences" Nugent to go out with the bobby-soxer until she is no longer infatuated. The extra features included on the DVD are: · June 13, 1949 LUX Radio theatre Radio Production starring Grant and Temple · "Little Tinker" Classic Tex Avery M-G-M cartoon · Cary Grant Trailer Gallery · Theatrical Trailer My Favorite Wife - Grant skillfully plays the romantic hunk and the comedic buffoon in this movie about marital mix-ups. Nick Arden (Grant) is on his way to the honeymoon suite with his new bride (Gail Patrick) when he runs into the wife (Irene Dunne) who was lost at sea and presumed dead seven years ago. The marriage knots have to be untied as the real Mrs. Arden steps up to claim her husband in this quirky romance filled with high jinks and big laughs. My Favorite Wife will contain the following bonus content: · Vintage M-G-M Robert Benchley short subject "Home Movies" · December 7, 1949 Screen Director¿s Playhouse Radio Production starring Grant and Dunne · Theatrical Trailer Destination Tokyo - Grant is a military hero in this action-filled war drama. As Captain Cassidy, Grant pilots the U.S. submarine Copperfin through the dangerous waters of the enemy's front yard. Delmer Daves makes his directorial debut with this film that critics say remains "a classic war drama." This is the only military drama Grant made during World War II. Destination Tokyo will contain these bonus features: · Warner Bros. WWII short: "Gem of the Ocean" · Cary Grant Trailer Gallery · Theatrical Trailer Night And Day - Appearing in his first Technicolor motion picture, Grant portrays Cole Porter, the legendary, sophisticated songwriter whose life was marked by triumph and tragedy. He's joined by a superb cast including Alexis Smith, Jane Wyman, Eve Arden and Monty Woolley as himself. The film contains more than 20 of Porter's songs which have been enjoyed by many generations over the years. One of the film's most famous moments is Mary Martin re-creating her Broadway performance of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy," the show-stopper that made her an overnight star. Even Cary gets into the act singing "You're the Top" with `40s chanteuse Ginny Simms. Interestingly, Hollywood is once again bringing Porter's life to the screen later this year, with Kevin Kline portraying the composer in Irwin Winkler's film "DeLovely." The extra content in Night And Day will be: · Vintage Warner Bros. Shorts: Desi Arnaz and His Orchestra and "Musical Movieland" · Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd in "The Big Snooze" a classic Looney Tunes cartoon · Cole Porter Trailer Gallery Each DVD will be presented in a format preserving the aspect ratio of its original theatrical exhibition and will include subtitles in English, French and Spanish. All except The Bachelor and The Bobby-Soxer are in Dual-Layer format. To order Cary Grant: The Signature Collection, click here. Explore more Cary Grant titles here.

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Songwriter Cole Porter was born into a wealthy family in Peru, IN on June 9, 1891. He was educated at Yale University and studied law at Harvard. In 1916, his first musical comedy, See America First, failed after fifteen performances. In 1919, he married Linda Lee Thomas, a wealthy, socially prominent divorcee, eight years older than he. Biographies have indicated that Porter, a secret homosexual, and his wife lived separate lives for much of their marriage. Porter wrote many successful shows including Fifty Million Frenchmen, Wake Up and Dream, Anything Goes, DuBarry Was a Lady and Silk Stockings, as well as film scores. Contrary to the film's story, Monty Woolley was not a professor of Porter's, but a fellow student, and Porter was never wounded in World War I, although he did have a serious horseback riding accident in the mid-1930s which eventually resulted in the amputation of one leg in 1956. The film's credits state that it was "based on the career of Cole Porter." The chronology of Porter's songs and musical plays was altered for the film. Modern sources speculate that the character of "Carol Hall" was based on Ethel Merman. Mary Martin first attracted attention for her singing of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy" in Porter's musical Leave It To Me, and the song became her signature. Night and Day marked Martin's last major film appearance, although she did appear as herself in the 1953 M-G-M release Main Street to Broadway.
       Hal B. Wallis was slated to produce the picture, but left the studio before the start of filming because of a disagreement with Jack L. Warner. According to a September 20, 1945 Hollywood Reporter news item, the film's pre-production costs were almost $4,000,000, with $1,000,000 being spent just on developing the script. Papers in the Warner Bros. Collection at the USC Cinema-Television Library add the following information about the production: Elick Moll, Steve Fisher, Tom D'Andrea, Philip G. Epstein, Stephen Morehouse Avery and Joseph Than all worked on various versions of the screenplay. The extent of their contribution to the final film is not known. In a telegram dated September 15, 1945, Jack Moffitt, who is credited onscreen with the adaptation, protested his credit. The scenes at Yale University were actually filmed on location at Los Angeles City College, CA. Other scenes were filmed in California at the Busch Gardens in Pasadena, the Warner Bros. Ranch, the Providencia Ranch in Universal City and in Beverly Hills. Cinematographer Bert Glennon was replaced by Peverell Marley on June 26, 1945, two weeks after production began. From 6 October to October 12, 1945, strike conditions stopped work on the film.
       Ray Heindorf and Max Steiner were nominated for an Academy Award for their musical score. The film clip of Roy Rogers singing "Don't Fence Me In" is from the 1945 Republic picture of the same name. In 2004 De-Lovely, another film biography of Porter, was released. That film, directed by Irwin Winkler and starring Kevin Kline as Porter and Ashley Judd as his wife, combined musical numbers based on Porter's songs with biographical scenes. The film centered on the complex relationship between the Porters and the songwriter's bisexuality, a fact not publicly discussed until after his death in 1964.