Next Time We Love


1h 27m 1936

Brief Synopsis

Woman drops out of college to marry an ambitious, young journalist. Their happiness is delayed when a rich admirer sees that she gets an acting job just as her reporter leaves to cover the news from Rome. The marriage goes stale as separartions follow reunions, and the two pursue their respective ca

Film Details

Also Known As
Next Time We Live
Release Date
Jan 27, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
San Francisco, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Next Time We Live by Ursula Parrott (New York, 1935).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Synopsis

In 1927, Cicely Hunt is so head-over-heels in love with Christopher Tyler that she marries him in New York instead of returning to college. To make ends meet, Chris's friend, Tommy Abbott, helps Cicely find an acting job, while Chris works as a small-time journalist. Chris's joy at obtaining a management job at his newspaper's office in Rome is dampened because Cicely refuses to go with him, preferring to stay in New York to pursue her theatrical career. After he leaves, she confides in Tommy that she is pregnant, and did not want her condition to interfere with Chris's career. Months later, Chris loses his job because he leaves Europe when Tommy wires him of his wife's childbirth, instead of turning in an article on a serious political situation in Italy. In New York, he discovers he has a son named Kit, but becomes dejected when he can only find work at a lowly city news bureau. Cicely accepts Tommy's offer of a three hundred dollar loan and a part in a theater production. Chris becomes more depressed when Cicely tells him of her prospective employment, so she goes to see his former managing editor, Frank Carteret, and convinces him to offer Chris another position, even though it means he will be posted in Russia. Through the years, Chris becomes a noted journalist and Cicely becomes an acclaimed actress, but they become estranged from one another because of the long absences. One year after a brief visit from Chris, Tommy confesses to Cicely that he has always loved her, and would like her to divorce Chris and marry him. Although she is deeply fond of Tommy, Cicely is unable to let go of Chris in her heart, and vows she will wait for him, no matter how long it takes for them to be together. Unknown to Cicely, Chris has been diagnosed with a fatal disease and has resigned from his work and is living at a sanitarium in Switzerland. While Kit stays with Tommy in California, Cicely meets Chris in St. Anton, Switzerland. Chris lies and says that she should divorce him, as there are many days when she is not in his thoughts. Cicely is heartbroken, but still proposes they spend three days together. Chris secretly checks out of the hotel and boards a train for the sanitarium, but Cicely finds him and draws the truth out of him--that he is dying and has always loved her. They embrace and depart together on the train.

Film Details

Also Known As
Next Time We Live
Release Date
Jan 27, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
San Francisco, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Next Time We Live by Ursula Parrott (New York, 1935).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Articles

Next Time We Love - Margaret Sullavan & James Stewart in NEXT TIME WE LOVE on DVD


Margaret Sullavan gets top billing in Next Time We Love (1936), but James Stewart gets his first full-fledged leading role, making this otherwise fair picture of special interest. It's now out on DVD from Universal Home Entertainment as part of their James Stewart: Screen Legend Collection.

The story, a romantic melodrama based on a novel called Say Goodbye Again, has Stewart and Sullavan young and in love in New York City. He's a beginning newspaper reporter and she's on her way off to college. At the last possible moment, however, she decides to stay in New York and make a go of marriage with him. Through some connections of Stewart's actor buddy Ray Milland (billed as "Raymond Milland"), Sullavan falls into an acting career, and, as happens in these kinds of movies, quickly becomes a top Broadway star. Priorities clash when Stewart gets a plum foreign correspondent gig in Rome and expects his wife to join him, but Sullavan wants to stay and keep up her acting. As their careers veer off in different directions, the story takes a curious shift where we spend much more time with Sullavan in New York as Stewart works abroad, coming home every few months or so. Each time, it is harder for them to rekindle their romance and keep their love from disintegrating completely - even with the presence now of a baby.

It's not terribly convincing, partly because the film never really lets us feel the intensity of their love to begin with and partly because of overly melodramatic plot twists, but it is interesting to see Stewart developing his acting chops and to see the two stars together for the first of four films. They are good together, and would be even better in The Shop Around the Corner (1940) and The Mortal Storm (1940). Those, of course, are masterpieces from two of Hollywood's best-ever directors (Ernst Lubitsch and Frank Borzage), but just as important is Stewart's increased experience in front of the camera. He's simply much more at ease in those later films.

In Next Time We Love, he's OK, even charming, in some scenes, and a bit stiff in others, which tend to be underwritten to begin with. Sullavan, meanwhile, handles those underwritten scenes just fine, saving them with the sheer force of her talent, something which Stewart would yet learn to do. It's quite fascinating to watch the difference on screen.

Stewart's best scene takes place in a Geneva cafe with the crusty, cold managing editor (Robert McWade) of his paper. They have a heart-to-heart with some very good dialogue: "At my age, I've seen love so seldom that when I do, I like to stop and warm my hands before it," says McWade. Stewart's reactions - his listening - are perfectly understated and effective here.

It's likely that this cafe scene was shot well after Sullavan started giving Stewart some private acting lessons; in fact, she deserved a lot of credit for Stewart becoming widely recognized in Hollywood to begin with. The two had known each other from their New York theater days. A few years after Sullavan moved to Hollywood and became a big star, she was being driven along Hollywood Blvd. when she noticed Stewart "walking along by himself, hands in his pocket, head down" (according to Stewart biographer Marc Eliot). She picked him up and they reconnected their friendship. Stewart had been in town a short time and was under contract to MGM, which had given him small roles in two features: The Murder Man (1935) and Rosa-Marie (1936). Clearly Louis B. Mayer had no idea what to do with the gangly actor. Sullavan, on the other hand, had always felt Stewart would become a major star and now she was in a position to help make that happen. She told Universal that she would only do Next Time We Love if they hired him to play opposite her. They'd never heard of him, but ultimately she got her way.

Stewart's inexperience came through in the rushes and made the Universal brass nervous, but Sullavan took him under her wing and gave him screen acting lessons at night, explaining how body movements and voice projection were different for movie work. Rumors floated around that Sullavan (who was married to director William Wyler) and Stewart were having an affair, but Sullavan's interest seems to have been more maternal and protective. Stewart had always had a crush on the actress and undoubtedly would have liked the rumors to be true. He later said, "I'll never marry until I find a girl like Margaret Sullavan."

The other movies in this DVD collection are a strange mix indeed: the toe-tapping The Glenn Miller Story (1953), the rip-roaring Thunder Bay (1953) (both from director Anthony Mann), the minor, mid-career You Gotta Stay Happy (1948), and the minor, late-career Shenandoah (1965). The Glenn Miller Story and Shenandoah were previously issued on DVD in 2003; the others are first-time releases. Picture and sound quality of Next Time We Love are perfectly fine, though this is not a restored, unblemished print. There are no extras in this modestly-priced collection except for some trailers.

A final note: Preston Sturges worked uncredited on this screenplay, though the film doesn't really bear any of his personality.

For more information about Next Time We Love, visit Universal Home Entertainment. To order Next Time We Love (available as part of James Stewart: Screen Legends Collection only), go to TCM Shopping.

by Jeremy Arnold
Next Time We Love - Margaret Sullavan & James Stewart In Next Time We Love On Dvd

Next Time We Love - Margaret Sullavan & James Stewart in NEXT TIME WE LOVE on DVD

Margaret Sullavan gets top billing in Next Time We Love (1936), but James Stewart gets his first full-fledged leading role, making this otherwise fair picture of special interest. It's now out on DVD from Universal Home Entertainment as part of their James Stewart: Screen Legend Collection. The story, a romantic melodrama based on a novel called Say Goodbye Again, has Stewart and Sullavan young and in love in New York City. He's a beginning newspaper reporter and she's on her way off to college. At the last possible moment, however, she decides to stay in New York and make a go of marriage with him. Through some connections of Stewart's actor buddy Ray Milland (billed as "Raymond Milland"), Sullavan falls into an acting career, and, as happens in these kinds of movies, quickly becomes a top Broadway star. Priorities clash when Stewart gets a plum foreign correspondent gig in Rome and expects his wife to join him, but Sullavan wants to stay and keep up her acting. As their careers veer off in different directions, the story takes a curious shift where we spend much more time with Sullavan in New York as Stewart works abroad, coming home every few months or so. Each time, it is harder for them to rekindle their romance and keep their love from disintegrating completely - even with the presence now of a baby. It's not terribly convincing, partly because the film never really lets us feel the intensity of their love to begin with and partly because of overly melodramatic plot twists, but it is interesting to see Stewart developing his acting chops and to see the two stars together for the first of four films. They are good together, and would be even better in The Shop Around the Corner (1940) and The Mortal Storm (1940). Those, of course, are masterpieces from two of Hollywood's best-ever directors (Ernst Lubitsch and Frank Borzage), but just as important is Stewart's increased experience in front of the camera. He's simply much more at ease in those later films. In Next Time We Love, he's OK, even charming, in some scenes, and a bit stiff in others, which tend to be underwritten to begin with. Sullavan, meanwhile, handles those underwritten scenes just fine, saving them with the sheer force of her talent, something which Stewart would yet learn to do. It's quite fascinating to watch the difference on screen. Stewart's best scene takes place in a Geneva cafe with the crusty, cold managing editor (Robert McWade) of his paper. They have a heart-to-heart with some very good dialogue: "At my age, I've seen love so seldom that when I do, I like to stop and warm my hands before it," says McWade. Stewart's reactions - his listening - are perfectly understated and effective here. It's likely that this cafe scene was shot well after Sullavan started giving Stewart some private acting lessons; in fact, she deserved a lot of credit for Stewart becoming widely recognized in Hollywood to begin with. The two had known each other from their New York theater days. A few years after Sullavan moved to Hollywood and became a big star, she was being driven along Hollywood Blvd. when she noticed Stewart "walking along by himself, hands in his pocket, head down" (according to Stewart biographer Marc Eliot). She picked him up and they reconnected their friendship. Stewart had been in town a short time and was under contract to MGM, which had given him small roles in two features: The Murder Man (1935) and Rosa-Marie (1936). Clearly Louis B. Mayer had no idea what to do with the gangly actor. Sullavan, on the other hand, had always felt Stewart would become a major star and now she was in a position to help make that happen. She told Universal that she would only do Next Time We Love if they hired him to play opposite her. They'd never heard of him, but ultimately she got her way. Stewart's inexperience came through in the rushes and made the Universal brass nervous, but Sullavan took him under her wing and gave him screen acting lessons at night, explaining how body movements and voice projection were different for movie work. Rumors floated around that Sullavan (who was married to director William Wyler) and Stewart were having an affair, but Sullavan's interest seems to have been more maternal and protective. Stewart had always had a crush on the actress and undoubtedly would have liked the rumors to be true. He later said, "I'll never marry until I find a girl like Margaret Sullavan." The other movies in this DVD collection are a strange mix indeed: the toe-tapping The Glenn Miller Story (1953), the rip-roaring Thunder Bay (1953) (both from director Anthony Mann), the minor, mid-career You Gotta Stay Happy (1948), and the minor, late-career Shenandoah (1965). The Glenn Miller Story and Shenandoah were previously issued on DVD in 2003; the others are first-time releases. Picture and sound quality of Next Time We Love are perfectly fine, though this is not a restored, unblemished print. There are no extras in this modestly-priced collection except for some trailers. A final note: Preston Sturges worked uncredited on this screenplay, though the film doesn't really bear any of his personality. For more information about Next Time We Love, visit Universal Home Entertainment. To order Next Time We Love (available as part of James Stewart: Screen Legends Collection only), go to TCM Shopping. by Jeremy Arnold

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Ursula Parrott's novel was first titled Say Goodbye Again and was serialized in McCall's from December 1934-April 1935 under that title. The working title of the film was Next Time We Live. According to a Daily Variety news item, director Edward Griffith and studio executives debated over the title of the film, because Griffith felt that the title Next Time We Live would attract patrons because it was the title of the novel, while executives felt that the novel's title "might deflect prospective patrons who don't like reincarnation ring." Daily Variety news items also report the following: Three weeks into production, writer Doris Anderson was "teamed" with Melville Baker to complete the script. Shooting had begun with only half of the script written by Baker. Francis Lederer was originally cast for the lead role, but was unavailable due to prior commitments. Production was delayed because Margaret Sullavan was busy shooting retakes for Paramount's film So Red the Rose (see below). Universal gaffer Max Nippel's newborn infant appeared in the film. Assistant director Ralph Slosser testified at a National Labor Relations Board investigation in 1938 that he directed some scenes for this film in San Francisco using doubles, following a request that he do so by the studio, and that he also directed some studio scenes; the investigation was concerned with the question of whether assistant directors were ever called on to direct scenes. According to a modern source, Sullavan was responsible for the casting of James Stewart in this role.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1936

Released in United States 1997

Released in United States 1936

Released in United States 1997 (Shown in New York City (Walter Reade) as part of program "American Romantics: Frank Borzage and Margaret Sullavan" August 22 - September 16, 1997.)