The Muppets Take Manhattan


1h 34m 1984
The Muppets Take Manhattan

Brief Synopsis

Kermit and his friends try to get their musical produced on Broadway.

Film Details

Also Known As
Los Muppets conquistan Manhattan, Mupparna på Manhattan, Muppets Take Manhattan, Muppets conquistan Manhattan
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Family
Music
Sequel
Release Date
1984
Production Company
Metrocolor; R/Greenberg Associates; The Jim Henson Company; Tristar Pictures
Distribution Company
Columbia-Emi-Warner; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Tristar Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m

Synopsis

Fresh out of college, Kermit, Fozzie and the entire cast of Kermit's musical "Manhattan Melodies" head for the Big Apple with plans to turn their small play into a big hit. All they need now is someone to produce their show. But when no one in town will even meet with them, it's up to Kermit to believe hard enough for all of his friends that the show WILL go on.

Cast

Bruce Edward Hall

Beth Bear

James J Kroupa

David Rudman

Melissa Whitmire

Michael Earl Davis

Glenngo King

Tim Dehaas

Cheryl Bartholow

Martin P Robinson

Cheryl Mcfadden

Mr Price'S Secretary

Joanne Hamlin

Woman In Price'S Office

Nancy Kirsch

Screaming Woman

Viola Borden

Bingo Caller

John Eric Bentley

Train Conductor

Hector Troy

1st Cop

Norman Bush

2nd Cop

Graham Brown

Mr Wrightson

Paul Stolarsky

Aquacade Announcer

Maree Dow

Woman In The Bleachers

Don Quigley

Man In The Bleachers

Michael Connolly

Maitre D' At Sardi'S

Gary Tacon

Thief In Central Park

Joe Jamrog

Cop In Central Park

Mark Marrone

Chauffeur

Cyril Jenkins Dr

Minister

Steven Burnett

College Student

Mary Lou Harris

College Student

Ron Foster

Man In Winesop'S Office

Michael Hirsch

Man In Winesop'S Office

Vic Polizos

Construction Worker

Kenneth J Mcgregor

Construction Worker

James Bryson

Pete'S Customer

Chico Kasinoir

Pete'S Customer

Alice Spivak

Pete'S Customer

Dorothy Baxter

Elevator Passenger

Stephen Sherrard Hicks

Elevator Passenger

Susan Miller-kovens

Elevator Passenger

John Maguire

Elevator Passenger

Sinead Maguire

Elevator Passenger

Trisha Maguire

Elevator Passenger

Wade Barnes

Sardi'S Customer

Ruth Button

Sardi'S Customer

Lee-ann Carr

Sardi'S Customer

Richard Dubois

Sardi'S Customer

Diana Hayes

Sardi'S Customer

Jane Hunt

Sardi'S Customer

Jacqueline Page

Sardi'S Customer

Harriet Rawlings

Sardi'S Customer

Milton Seaman

Sardi'S Customer

Dabney Coleman

(Cameo Appearance)

John Landis

(Cameo Appearance)

Joan Rivers

(Cameo Appearance)

Gregory Hines

(Cameo Appearance)

James Coco

(Cameo Appearance)

Art Carney

(Cameo Appearance)

Linda Lavin

(Cameo Appearance)

Liza Minnelli

(Cameo Appearance)

Vincent Sardi

(Cameo Appearance)

Elliott Gould

(Cameo Appearance)

Ed Koch

(Cameo Appearance)

Brooke Shields

(Cameo Appearance)

Frances Bergen

(Cameo Appearance)

Jim Henson

Voice Of Kermit The Frog/Rowlf/Dr Teeth/Swedish Chef/Waldorf

Frank Oz

Voice Of Miss Piggy/Fozzie Bear/Animal

Dave Goelz

Voice Of Gonzo/Chester Rat/Bill The Frog/Zoot

Steve Whitmire

Voice Of Rizzo The Rat/Gil The Frog

Richard Hunt

Voice Of Scooter/Statler/Janice/Sweetums Beaker

Jerry Nelson

Voice Of Floyd Pepper/Camilla/Lew Zealand

Kathryn Mullen

Voice Of Jill The Frog

Karen Prell

Voice Of Yolanda Rat

Brian Muehl

Voice Of Tatooey Rat

Bruce Edward Hall

Voice Of Masterson Rat

Lonny Price

Voice Of Ronnie Crawford

Louis Zorich

Voice Of Pete

Juliana Donald

Voice Of Jenny

Crew

Lauren Antinello

Construction

Lauren Antinello

Muppet Design

Lee Austin

Wardrobe Supervisor

Patricia Barrow

Production Assistant

Cheryl Blackman

Stunt Man

Cheryl Blalock

Construction

Cheryl Blalock

Muppet Design

Stan Bochner

Sound Editor

Timothy M. Bourne

Assistant Director

Ron Bozman

Assistant Director

Fred Buchholz

Muppet Design

Fred Buchholz

Construction

Fern Buchner

Makeup

Ralph Burns

Music

Lou Cerborino

Sound Editor

Al Cerullo

Pilot

Chris Chadman

Choreography (Rats Kitchen Number)

Christopher Chadman

Choreographer

Edward C Christie

Muppet Design

Edward C Christie

Construction

Anthony Ciccolini

Sound Editor Supervisor

Charlie Clifton

Sound Recording

Frank Comito

Production Assistant

Paul Coombe

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Cliff Cudney

Stunt Driver

John F. Davis

Storyboards

Janet Delvoye

Construction

Janet Delvoye

Muppet Design

Lee Dichter

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Leigh Donaldson

Special Effects (Muppets)

Edward Drohan

Special Effects

Robert Drumheller

Set Decorator

Paul Eads

Art Direction

Tony Farentino

Stunt Driver

Prudence Farrow

Production Assistant

Faz Fazakas

Special Effects (Muppets)

Bob Flanagan

Muppet Design

Bob Flanagan

Construction

Michael K Frith

Design Consultant

Anthony Gittelson

Assistant Director

Jane Gootnick

Other

Lee Gottsegen

Production Assistant

W Steven Graham

Art Direction

Joanne Green

Costumes (Muppets)

James W Greenhut

Studio Manager

Jerry Gum

Construction

Jerry Gum

Muppet Design

Calista Hendrickson

Costumes (Muppets)

Stephen Hendrickson

Production Designer

Brian Henson

Special Effects (Muppets)

Jim Henson

Executive Producer

Jim Henson

Choreography

Amy Herman

Production Assistant

Vito L Ilardi

Sound Recording Mixer

Larry Jameson

Special Effects (Muppets)

Tom Jung

Sound Recording (Music)

Todd Kasow

Sound Editor (Music)

Debra Louis Katz

Wardrobe

Marian Keating

Muppet Design

Marian Keating

Construction

Thomas L Keller

Costumes

Ian C Kelly

Video Engineer Supervisor

Richard Kratina

Camera Operator

Rollin Krewson

Other

Robin Kusten

Construction

Robin Kusten

Muppet Design

Les Lazarowitz

Sound Recording Mixer

David Lazer

Producer

Evan Lottman

Editor

Dick Loveless

Special Effects (Muppets)

Denise Lucadamo

Stunt Man

Vic Magnotta

Stunt Coordinator

Maria Mcnamara

Construction

Maria Mcnamara

Muppet Design

Tim Miller

Muppet Design

Tim Miller

Construction

David Misch

Special Consultant

Jeff Moss

Music

Sandy Nelson

Location Coordinator

Tom Newby

Special Effects (Muppets)

Peter R Norman

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Frank Oz

Screenwriter

Tom Patchett

From Story

Tom Patchett

Screenwriter

Tom Patchett

Story By

Bruce Patterson

Production Office Coordinator

Robert Paynter

Dp/Cinematographer

Robert Paynter

Director Of Photography

Connie Peterson

Construction

Connie Peterson

Muppet Design

Jan Rosenthal

Construction

Jan Rosenthal

Muppet Design

Karen Roston

Costume Designer

Maurice Schell

Sound Editor

Jody Schoffner

Construction

Jody Schoffner

Muppet Design

Justin Scoppa

Set Decorator

Polly Smith

Costume Designer

James Sorice

Master Scenic Artist

Carol Spier

Costumes (Muppets)

Muriel Stockdale

Costumes (Muppets)

Chris Stoia

Production Assistant

Ezra Swerdlow

Production Manager

Jay Tarses

Screenwriter

Jay Tarses

From Story

Jay Tarses

Story By

Norman Tempia

Muppet Design

Norman Tempia

Construction

Richard Termine

Muppet Design

Richard Termine

Construction

Christa Tomasulo

Stunt Man (Miss Piggy)

David Weinman

Set Dresser

Caroly Wilcox

Muppet Design

Caroly Wilcox

Construction

Mel Zelniker

Adr Recording

Film Details

Also Known As
Los Muppets conquistan Manhattan, Mupparna på Manhattan, Muppets Take Manhattan, Muppets conquistan Manhattan
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Family
Music
Sequel
Release Date
1984
Production Company
Metrocolor; R/Greenberg Associates; The Jim Henson Company; Tristar Pictures
Distribution Company
Columbia-Emi-Warner; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Tristar Pictures

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m

Award Nominations

Best Score

1984

Articles

The Muppets Take Manhattan


1984 saw the return of Jim Henson's beloved Muppets to the silver screen in The Muppets Take Manhattan, the third film offering from the creator of the Sesame Street characters. The enormous success of the television series The Muppet Show (1976-81) paved the way for the first feature film, the aptly-named The Muppet Movie (1979), which was followed by The Great Muppet Caper three years later. Kermit, Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear, and the rest of the gang are back in The Muppets Take Manhattan, this time banding together to get their musical revue to Broadway. As usual, complications ensue and star cameos are plentiful, with such lively tunes as "Rat Scat" sprinkled throughout the action.

Longtime Muppet collaborator Frank Oz directed the film in addition to co-writing the screenplay and providing the voices for such characters as Miss Piggy, Fozzie, and Animal. Oz, also known as the voice of Yoda from the Star Wars film franchise, helmed another Henson production, The Dark Crystal (1982) as well as various non-puppet pictures - Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988), What About Bob? (1991), and The Score (2001). Oz had been working with Henson since the early sixties-in fact, it was Jim who recommended Frank for the Yoda role to George Lucas. Henson, who named his creations because they were a cross between puppets and marionettes, was also the voice for Kermit, Rowlf, and the Swedish Chef in addition to his executive producer duties. He also staged one of the most difficult scenes in the film, the one where the rats fix breakfast in the diner.

In this scene, puppeteers had to convince the audience that five rats can cook the important meal of the day. To do so, interesting challenges had to be resolved, like how to sew a fried egg to a rat puppet. Answer? Scrap the egg and make it a piece of toast instead. When a paint mixture created to resemble pancake batter proved so caustic as to etch into metal surfaces, the effects team decided just to use actual batter instead. After several failed attempts at simulating butter pats for a rat to skate around on to grease the griddle, Jim simply suggested, "Let's try the butter." It worked.

Henson experimented with more complex scenarios for his Muppets on film; for example, having them ride bicycles or dance around a room. For such sequences, a marionette version of the Muppet was created for full body shots, with the original hand puppet used for close-up work. When the two types of shot were spliced together in the editing room, the use of different types of puppets is seamless to audiences. The maintenance of believability was very important to Henson, who explained, "As soon as the audience starts thinking about the cleverness of it all, then they're not thinking about the performances. When the Muppets are on the screen, I want the audience to believe in the moment. The audience can see that most of the characters end at the waist most of the time, and they can know who talks for them-none of that seems to kill the moment. But when they're watching us perform, believing the moment is everything."

The list of stars making appearances in The Muppets Take Manhattan is impressive, and includes Liza Minnelli, Art Carney, Gregory Hines, Linda Lavin, Brooke Shields, Elliott Gould, and Joan Rivers. Even ex-NYC mayor Ed Koch gets in on the fun, as well as the wife of puppeteer legend Edgar Bergen (and mother of actress Candice), Frances Bergen. Henson's young adult children Brian and Heather also have bit roles, on and off-screen. All of the locations for the film were in the New York area, with the campus of Vassar College selected for Kermit's graduation scene (the scene was filmed in the college's dining hall). The Muppets Take Manhattan was nominated for an Oscar® in the Original Score category and spawned a spin-off: the animated Muppet Babies (1984-91) series, inspired by the fantasy sequence in the film. In the playful spirit of the film, watchful viewers will notice the names gracing two of the kennel cages at Rowlf's vet office: Jim and Frank.

Producer: Jim Henson, David Lazer
Director: Frank Oz
Screenplay: Tom Patchett, Jay Tarses, Frank Oz
Cinematography: Robert Paynter
Film Editing: Evan A. Lottman
Art Direction: Paul Eads, W. Steven Graham
Music: Ralph Burns
Cast: Jim Henson (Kermit the Frog), Frank Oz (Miss Piggy/Fozzie), Dave Goelz (Gonzo), Steve Whitmire (Rizzo the Rat).
C-94m. Letterboxed.

by Eleanor Quin
The Muppets Take Manhattan

The Muppets Take Manhattan

1984 saw the return of Jim Henson's beloved Muppets to the silver screen in The Muppets Take Manhattan, the third film offering from the creator of the Sesame Street characters. The enormous success of the television series The Muppet Show (1976-81) paved the way for the first feature film, the aptly-named The Muppet Movie (1979), which was followed by The Great Muppet Caper three years later. Kermit, Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear, and the rest of the gang are back in The Muppets Take Manhattan, this time banding together to get their musical revue to Broadway. As usual, complications ensue and star cameos are plentiful, with such lively tunes as "Rat Scat" sprinkled throughout the action. Longtime Muppet collaborator Frank Oz directed the film in addition to co-writing the screenplay and providing the voices for such characters as Miss Piggy, Fozzie, and Animal. Oz, also known as the voice of Yoda from the Star Wars film franchise, helmed another Henson production, The Dark Crystal (1982) as well as various non-puppet pictures - Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988), What About Bob? (1991), and The Score (2001). Oz had been working with Henson since the early sixties-in fact, it was Jim who recommended Frank for the Yoda role to George Lucas. Henson, who named his creations because they were a cross between puppets and marionettes, was also the voice for Kermit, Rowlf, and the Swedish Chef in addition to his executive producer duties. He also staged one of the most difficult scenes in the film, the one where the rats fix breakfast in the diner. In this scene, puppeteers had to convince the audience that five rats can cook the important meal of the day. To do so, interesting challenges had to be resolved, like how to sew a fried egg to a rat puppet. Answer? Scrap the egg and make it a piece of toast instead. When a paint mixture created to resemble pancake batter proved so caustic as to etch into metal surfaces, the effects team decided just to use actual batter instead. After several failed attempts at simulating butter pats for a rat to skate around on to grease the griddle, Jim simply suggested, "Let's try the butter." It worked. Henson experimented with more complex scenarios for his Muppets on film; for example, having them ride bicycles or dance around a room. For such sequences, a marionette version of the Muppet was created for full body shots, with the original hand puppet used for close-up work. When the two types of shot were spliced together in the editing room, the use of different types of puppets is seamless to audiences. The maintenance of believability was very important to Henson, who explained, "As soon as the audience starts thinking about the cleverness of it all, then they're not thinking about the performances. When the Muppets are on the screen, I want the audience to believe in the moment. The audience can see that most of the characters end at the waist most of the time, and they can know who talks for them-none of that seems to kill the moment. But when they're watching us perform, believing the moment is everything." The list of stars making appearances in The Muppets Take Manhattan is impressive, and includes Liza Minnelli, Art Carney, Gregory Hines, Linda Lavin, Brooke Shields, Elliott Gould, and Joan Rivers. Even ex-NYC mayor Ed Koch gets in on the fun, as well as the wife of puppeteer legend Edgar Bergen (and mother of actress Candice), Frances Bergen. Henson's young adult children Brian and Heather also have bit roles, on and off-screen. All of the locations for the film were in the New York area, with the campus of Vassar College selected for Kermit's graduation scene (the scene was filmed in the college's dining hall). The Muppets Take Manhattan was nominated for an Oscar® in the Original Score category and spawned a spin-off: the animated Muppet Babies (1984-91) series, inspired by the fantasy sequence in the film. In the playful spirit of the film, watchful viewers will notice the names gracing two of the kennel cages at Rowlf's vet office: Jim and Frank. Producer: Jim Henson, David Lazer Director: Frank Oz Screenplay: Tom Patchett, Jay Tarses, Frank Oz Cinematography: Robert Paynter Film Editing: Evan A. Lottman Art Direction: Paul Eads, W. Steven Graham Music: Ralph Burns Cast: Jim Henson (Kermit the Frog), Frank Oz (Miss Piggy/Fozzie), Dave Goelz (Gonzo), Steve Whitmire (Rizzo the Rat). C-94m. Letterboxed. by Eleanor Quin

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003


Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57.

Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California.

Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances.

His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991).

He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57. Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California. Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances. His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991). He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States July 1984

Released in United States Summer July 1, 1984

Completed shooting March 1984.

Released in United States July 1984

Released in United States Summer July 1, 1984