The Mouse and His Child


1h 23m 1977

Brief Synopsis

A wind-up mouse and his son are trying to find a way to become self-winding when they accidentally fall off a shelf and are thrown out in the garbage. After this, they are imprisoned by an evil rat and have to find a way to escape.

Film Details

Also Known As
Extraordinary Adventures of the Mouse and His Child, The, Mouse and His Child
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1977

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color

Synopsis

A wind-up mouse and his son are trying to find a way to become self-winding when they accidentally fall off a shelf and are thrown out in the garbage. After this, they are imprisoned by an evil rat and have to find a way to escape.

Crew

Maria Alvarez

Graphics

Irv Anderson

Animator

Lorraine Andrina

Supervisor

Richard Blair

Background Artist

Bonnie Blough

Graphics

Dave Brain

Animator

Bob Bransford

Animator

Christina Cartusciello

Graphics

Brad Case

Animator

Jules Chaikin

Music Supervisor

Judy Champin

Graphics

Sam Clayberger

Background Artist

Corny Cole

Animator

Don Coorough

Production Assistant

Fred Craig

Other

Laura Craig

Graphics

Mari Daugherty

Graphics

Vincent Davis

Animator

Vincent Davis

Production Designer

Vincent Davis

Other

Walt Defaria

Producer

Malcolm Draper

Animator

Jim Duffy

Animator

Marsha Hunt Eshnaur

Graphics

Donna Evans

Production Coordinator

Kassiani Galinos

Graphics

Paulino Garcia

Graphics

John Gibbs

Animator

Milt Gray

Animator

Lu Guarnier

Animator

Wilma Guenot

Color Supervisor

Rich Harrison

Editor Supervisor

Noriko Horiuchi Hawks

Graphics

Russell Hoban

Source Material (From Novel)

Jacqueline Hooks

Graphics

Paro Hozumi

Background Artist

Paro Hozumi

Graphics

Colin Chastain Kellaway

Song Performer ("Tell Me My Name")

Roger Kellaway

Music

Roger Kellaway

Songs ("Scat Rat" "Much In Little" "Tell Me My Name")

Roger Kellaway

Song Performer ("Scat Rat")

Amy Kenney

Production Manager

Corry Kingsbury

Graphics

Sam Kirson

Production Designer

Mike Kubina

Production Assistant

Lynn Lascaro

Background Artist

Karan J Lee-storr

Graphics

Gene Lees

Songs ("Scat Rat" "Much In Little" "Tell Me My Name")

Gene Lees

Lyrics

Warren Lockhart

Executive Producer

Alex Lucas

Associate Producer

Bud Luckey

Animator

David Mcmacken

Art Direction

Joanne Mcpherson

Other

Wally Menuoch-anicam

Cinematography (Animation)

Celine Miles

Other

Loni Miller

Graphics

Bob Mitchell

Production Designer

Gary Mooney

Animator

Russell Mooney

Animator

Peggy Lynn Nakaguchi

Graphics

Linda Navroth

Graphics

Carol Mon Pere

Screenwriter

Diana Proud

Graphics

Willis Pyle

Animator

Pamela Randles

Graphics

Gerry Ray

Animator

Robin Reed

Song Performer ("Much In Little")

June Rose Ross

Graphics

Deborah Rykoff

Graphics

Mike Sanger

Animator

Bob Schaefer

Background Artist

Al Sheath

Production Designer

Olaya Stephenson

Graphics

Ann Sutherland

Graphics

Joan Swanson

Animator

Charles Swenson

Animator

Robert Taylor

Animator

Robert Taylor

Animator

Richard Trueblood

Animator

Gisele Van Bark

Graphics

Robin Belle Wagner

Graphics

Tim Walker

Animator

Denise Wethington

Graphics

Jeannette Whiteaker

Graphics

Tasia Williams

Graphics

Bill Wolf

Animator

Fred Wolf

Animator

Patty Wolf

Graphics

Ron Wong

Graphics

Alice Wright

Graphics

Elizabeth Wright

Supervisor

Joyse Yuen

Graphics

Bob Zamboni

Animator

Michele Zurcher

Graphics

Film Details

Also Known As
Extraordinary Adventures of the Mouse and His Child, The, Mouse and His Child
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1977

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color

Articles

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)


Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82.

He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut.

His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942).

He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough.

After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following.

Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960).

The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964).

He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986).

Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency.

Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82. He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut. His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942). He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough. After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following. Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960). The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964). He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986). Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency. Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1977

Released in United States 1977