The Moon's Our Home


1h 20m 1936

Brief Synopsis

A writer and an actress meet and marry without really knowing each other--they are even unaware that both bride and groom are equally famous. During the honeymoon, all hell breaks loose as a comedic war of the sexes leads inevitably to love.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 10, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Walter Wanger Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Moon's Our Home by Faith Baldwin (New York, 1936).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 20m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Synopsis

Famous screen star Cherry Chester is called back home to New York by her stern grandmother Lucy Van Steedan, who insists that Cherry marry her dimwitted cousin Horace Van Steedan, despite Cherry's protests. At the same time, famous adventurer/writer Anthony Amberton is in New York signing copies of his new book. Cherry and Anthony are scornful of each other, although they are not acquainted. When Anthony is overcome by the smell of Cherry's signature perfume in a department store, he runs out, chased by a mob of adoring fans, and leaps into Cherry's horse-drawn carriage. Unaware of each other's identity, they are instantly attracted and talk familiarly without introducing themselves. Anthony hurriedly leaves, but deposits a card in Cherry's hand as an invitation to his favorite winter hotel in Moonsocket, New Hampshire. Lucy arranges an ocean cruise to Europe where she intends to have Cherry and Horace marry, but Cherry disappears at the docks and travels to Moonsocket. There, she and Anthony introduce themselves by their real names, Sarah Brown and John Smith, and fall in love. They get married on a whim, but on their wedding night, Cherry uses some of her perfume, making Anthony unbearably ill. Ignorant of the reason behind his strange behavior, Cherry becomes irate and returns to New York, where she arranges to meet Horace. As he is an old acquaintance of Horace, Anthony attends his engagement party and discovers that Cherry is Horace's fiancée. Upon revealing their celebrity identities to each other, Cherry and Anthony have a knockdown fight. Cherry then leaves with Horace to catch a flight for California, where they intend to marry. After Anthony reveals to Lucy his marriage to Cherry, she has Horace temporarily arrested under false pretenses, thereby allowing Anthony time to catch up with Cherry at the airport, where they reconcile.

Film Details

Release Date
Apr 10, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Walter Wanger Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Moon's Our Home by Faith Baldwin (New York, 1936).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 20m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Faith Baldwin's novel was serialized in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (Sep 1935-January 1936). According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, actor Dick Talmadge cancelled a six-film arrangement with Reliance Pictures to be second unit director on this film. Motion Picture Herald's "Cutting Room" notes that in the original ending, character "Cherry Chester" is about to board a ship to Europe when "Anthony Amberton" catches up to her and convinces her to make the voyage their honeymoon. A news item in Hollywood Reporter notes that snow scenes were filmed on location in Big Bear, CA, while copyright publicity items claim the scenes were shot in the high Sierras in Northern California; however, a modern source credits Lake Tahoe as the site for the winter scenes.

Miscellaneous Notes

Shown at AFI/ Los Angeles International Film Festival (All Night Movie Marathon: "Comedies of Elegance") June 23 - July 7, 1994.

Shown in New York City (Walter Reade) as part of program "American Romantics: Frank Borzage and Margaret Sullavan" August 22 - September 16, 1997.

b&w