Mississippi Mermaid


2h 3m 1970
Mississippi Mermaid

Brief Synopsis

A plantation owner's mail-order bride turns out to be a beautiful woman with murder on her mind.

Film Details

Also Known As
La mia droga si chiama Julie, La sirène du Mississippi
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Mystery
Thriller
Foreign
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 1970
Premiere Information
New York opening: 10 Apr 1970
Production Company
Films du Carrosse; Les Productions Artistes Associés; Produzioni Associate Delphos
Distribution Company
Lopert Pictures; United Artists
Country
France
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Waltz Into Darkness by William Irish (New York, 1947).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 3m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Louis Mahé, a millionaire tobacco plantation owner on the island of Réunion, has become engaged through the personals columns of a French newspaper to Julie Roussel and awaits her arrival on the steamer Mississippi. He is greeted by a young woman who surprises him by her beauty and explains that she sent her sister's photo to assure the sincerity of his intentions. They quickly marry, and Louis's adoration of his new bride makes him overlook incongruities with Julie's description of herself in her letters. One day, Louis's bride absconds after emptying his bank accounts. Louis meets Julie's sister, Berthe Roussel, who informs him that the woman he married was not Julie; together they hire a private detective, Comolli, to track down the impostor and find Berthe's sister. En route by plane to Nice, Louis is suddenly stricken ill. Recuperating in a sanitarium, he sees Julie on television, dancing at a nightclub in Antibes. He travels there and hides in her hotel room, intent on killing her. She offers no resistance, but, explaining that her name is Marion, she tells him of her past, including years spent in prison, and of her association with a heartless gangster, Richard. Richard was with her on the Mississippi when they met Julie Roussel and learned of her forthcoming marriage. He had fabricated a plot to kill Julie and send Marion in her place to rob Louis; and afterwards Richard had forced her to go through with the robbery. Louis quickly forgives Marion, and they decide to live together in France on profits from the plantation. In Aix-en-Provence their happiness is interrupted by Comolli, who has discovered Julie's murder. After trying in vain to bribe the detective to drop the case, Louis shoots him and buries him in the wine cellar of their house. He flees with Marion to Lyons, but she grows increasingly dissatisfied with their fugitive existence and longs to enjoy a life of luxury in Paris. To obtain funds, Louis returns briefly to Réunion and sells his share in the plantation, but upon his return he finds the police on their trail. They are again forced to flee, leaving behind the money; penniless, they hide out in a cabin in the French Alps, but Marion is restless and irritable. Louis becomes increasingly ill, and one day he becomes aware that Marion has been administering quantities of rat poison in his coffee. Near collapse, he makes an attempt to escape, but Marion brings him back to the cabin. He reveals his knowledge of her plan, and, urging her to fill his coffee glass, he affirms his acceptance of his fate, his lack of regrets, and his overwhelming love for her. Struck with shame, Marion knocks the glass from Louis's hand and vows to make amends. As he regains his strength, they flee the hut together into the snow.

Film Details

Also Known As
La mia droga si chiama Julie, La sirène du Mississippi
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Mystery
Thriller
Foreign
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 1970
Premiere Information
New York opening: 10 Apr 1970
Production Company
Films du Carrosse; Les Productions Artistes Associés; Produzioni Associate Delphos
Distribution Company
Lopert Pictures; United Artists
Country
France
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Waltz Into Darkness by William Irish (New York, 1947).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 3m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Mississippi Mermaid


1970 was an extremely prolific year for French filmmaker Francois Truffaut with two of the three films he made - The Wild Child and Bed and Board (1970), the third installment of his Antoine Doinel quintet, receiving critical acclaim and securing his reputation as one of France's most important directors. Mississippi Mermaid, the film he made between those two, however, was his most expensive production to date, and one of Truffaut's rare failures. Despite the star power of its two leads, Catherine Deneuve and Jean-Paul Belmondo, it was a box office flop and a major disappointment for the director's admirers. Yet, for Truffaut, Mississippi Mermaid remains one of his most personal films, marked by its numerous homages to favorite films and filmmakers, and one which is now considered by some film scholars to be richer and more rewarding than Truffaut's more favored work due to its idiosyncrasies and mixture of moods and genres.

Based on the novel Waltz into Darkness by William Irish (a pseudonym for author Cornell Woolrich), which was published in France under the title La Siréne du Mississippi, Truffaut's adaptation transposed the setting from the Deep South to the French territory of La Reunion and changed Irish's downbeat ending to a more open-ended fadeout, stating "You must never end a spectacle on a downward curve. Life may descend into degradation, old age and death, but a spectacle must exalt and uplift."

The story opens with Louis Mahe (Jean-Paul Belmondo), a wealthy tobacco plantation owner, becoming engaged to a woman, Julie Roussel, through a personal column in a newspaper. When Julie (Catherine Deneuve) arrives via the riverboat Mississippi, she does not resemble her photograph nor the woman he imagined from her letters. Louis is nonetheless enchanted by Julie's beauty and they marry. Then Julie vanishes mysteriously, absconding with all of the holdings in Louis's bank account. It is soon learned from Berthe Roussel (Nelly Borgeaud) that her sister is missing and that someone impersonated her on the arrival boat. Louis and Berthe hire a private detective, Comolli (Michel Bouquet), to apprehend the impostor and find the missing Julie. Later, Louis discovers his wife is in Antibes and tracks her to her hotel room where she confesses her name is Marion and was partner-in-crime with Richard (Roland Thenot), who robbed and murdered the real Julie. Louis, still infatuated with Marion, forgives her but soon the couple find themselves on the run from the police who want to arrest Marion for murder. It is only after the couple have fled to an isolated cabin in the French Alps that Louis discovers Marion's true nature.

According to Truffaut, Mississippi Mermaid was "above all the story of a degradation of love." He also said the "film had been offered to me two years previously with Brigitte Bardot. I had adored the novel, but I had said, 'Bardot, out of the question. It will be Catherine Deneuve or no one.' I waited patiently in the wings and, as soon as the rights were available, I bought them with money lent me by Jeanne Moreau...and I shot the film as I saw fit, good or bad..."

In Francois Truffaut: Correspondence 1945-1984, the director described his first meeting with Jean-Paul Belmondo who he had long wished to use in a film: "He [Belmondo] greatly liked the novel, the characters and the plot. The only reservation he indicated to me concerned the character's age, which is indeed more advanced in the book. I believe I set his mind at rest on this point by explaining to him how I saw things, and he then expressed his wish to make the film...I told him that the adaptation would follow the book quite closely and he showed no desire to delay his acceptance until he had read the script, which would in any case be physically impossible since we will have to begin pre-production in two weeks and I plan to write most of the dialogue during the shoot, as I have almost always done in my French films."

From the start, Truffaut had to balance the two acting styles of Belmondo and Deneuve who were quite different in their preparation. In an interview in The New York Times Truffaut said, "He [Belmondo] starts out in a comic vein and the disparity with what I want is so great that I tell myself, 'I'm going to have to explain this, it's going to be difficult, it's going to take a long time,' and not at all, he says, 'Oh, you want it sadder,' and within seconds he changes it completely. That's because he has the dual theatre-movie training. He knows how to emphasize a line and how to throw a line away, whereas Catherine Deneuve is exclusively cinematic, completely untheatrical, every intonation is even. So sometimes you have to say, 'This sentence is important': you have to bring her out. I think they go well together; they're good to look at. I made Mississippi Mermaid in Cinemascope, so I could have them both on the screen most of the time. In a lot of American movies with two big stars you have a problem of vanity; each star is filmed separately so you can put little lights in their eyes, and you get the impression they didn't act together. But I didn't want one to be more important than the other so I kept them together."

Truffaut's source of inspiration throughout the filming of Mississippi Mermaid was, according to John Wakeham in World Film Directors, "Jean Renoir, to whom the film is dedicated because...every time he got stuck with the improvisation, he asked himself how Renoir would have solved the problem. But notwithstanding the model, and ample allusions to the master himself - the thematic link with La Chienne [1931], an open ending like La Grande Illusion [1937], clips from La Marseillaise [1938], and an allusion to Le Crime de M. Lange [1936] in the title of a film within the film," Mississippi Mermaid also paid homages to writer Honore de Balzac, directors Nicholas Ray, Jean Cocteau and Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo (1958), actor Humphrey Bogart, and a Cahiers Du Cinema editor whose name Comolli was used for the detective played by Michel Bouquet. There are even parallels and references to Truffaut's own work such as Shoot the Piano Player (1960) - the same mountain cabin hideout was used for the snowy climax in Mississippi Mermaid - and The Bride Wore Black (1968), which featured a heroine who was both a vision of beauty and a destroying angel to men, not unlike Deneuve's siren. (The Bride Wore Black was also based on a William Irish novel.)

Despite Truffaut's emotional and artistic investment in the film, the critical response to Mississippi Mermaid was decidedly mixed during its initial release. Variety reported that "Truffaut has come up with an uneven film mixing a love story, femme duality, suspense, but not quite getting the intertwining of wry tenderness, cohesive characterization and punctilious but charming insights that marked his recent pix." British critic Derek Elly wrote, "The director seems unsure whether to make a thriller, an homage, or a love story," but added that "beneath the trimmings, it is one of his most personal works...Truffaut's poem to the eternal bitch-goddess figure - and more particularly to Catherine Deneuve." (According to Truffaut's co-scenarist Bernard Revon, Deneuve was "the most beautiful love of his life.").

Truffaut was diplomatic about the criticisms, admitting that Mississippi Mermaid suffered a lack of cohesion because, for the sake of economy, he had to omit sections from the novel that would have added clarity and plausibility to the narrative and characters. He also realized that the casting of Belmondo and Deneuve created expectations in the audience that weren't met by his treatment of the material. "Perhaps what I had tried to do before in Tirez sur le pianiste [Shoot the Piano Player] and La Mariée était en noir [The Bride Wore Black] - combine an adventure story and a love story - worked less well here....as those who don't like it constitute 95%, I have to admit something went wrong."

Since its 1970 release, however, Mississippi Mermaid has been critically reappraised by many critics. David Thomson in The New Biographical Dictionary of Film wrote that it "actually masters Hitchcockian themes and turns into a rhapsody on a fatal obsession." And at a festival of Truffaut's work in 1999 at San Francisco's Castro Theatre, Edward Guthmann of the San Francisco Chronicle wrote "The decision to open the retrospective with "Mississippi Mermaid'' might seem odd, since the film was poorly received when released in the United States and has been held in such low esteem in the Truffaut canon...A classic case of a film being altered by overzealous cutting, ``Mermaid'' was released in the United States with 13 minutes missing. Now restored, those scenes give the film a clarity it lacked before and flesh out the characters in ways that justify their actions...The pieces all fit, and the result is a cool combo of film noir, star vehicle and picaresque romance. It's vintage Truffaut, and a great way to get acquainted or reacquainted with one of cinema's true masters."

Producers: Marcel Berbert and Francois Truffaut
Director: Francois Truffaut
Screenplay: Francois Truffaut; William Irish (novel "Waltz into Darkness")
Cinematography: Denys Clerval
Art Direction: Claude Pignot (Production Design, Set Decoration)
Music: Antoine Duhamel
Film Editing: Agnes Guillemot
Cast: Louis Mahe (Jean-Paul Belmondo), Julie Roussel/Marion Vergano (Catherine Deneuve), Berthe (Nelly Borgeaud), Landlady (Martine Ferriere), Jardine (Marcel Berbert)
C-124m. Closed captioning.

by Jeff Stafford

SOURCES:
Truffaut by Don Allen
Francois Truffaut by Annette Insdorf Francois Truffaut: Correspondence 1945-1984 edited by Gilles Jacob & Claude de Givray
World Film Directors, Vol. II, 1945-1985 by John Wakeham
IMDB
Mississippi Mermaid

Mississippi Mermaid

1970 was an extremely prolific year for French filmmaker Francois Truffaut with two of the three films he made - The Wild Child and Bed and Board (1970), the third installment of his Antoine Doinel quintet, receiving critical acclaim and securing his reputation as one of France's most important directors. Mississippi Mermaid, the film he made between those two, however, was his most expensive production to date, and one of Truffaut's rare failures. Despite the star power of its two leads, Catherine Deneuve and Jean-Paul Belmondo, it was a box office flop and a major disappointment for the director's admirers. Yet, for Truffaut, Mississippi Mermaid remains one of his most personal films, marked by its numerous homages to favorite films and filmmakers, and one which is now considered by some film scholars to be richer and more rewarding than Truffaut's more favored work due to its idiosyncrasies and mixture of moods and genres. Based on the novel Waltz into Darkness by William Irish (a pseudonym for author Cornell Woolrich), which was published in France under the title La Siréne du Mississippi, Truffaut's adaptation transposed the setting from the Deep South to the French territory of La Reunion and changed Irish's downbeat ending to a more open-ended fadeout, stating "You must never end a spectacle on a downward curve. Life may descend into degradation, old age and death, but a spectacle must exalt and uplift." The story opens with Louis Mahe (Jean-Paul Belmondo), a wealthy tobacco plantation owner, becoming engaged to a woman, Julie Roussel, through a personal column in a newspaper. When Julie (Catherine Deneuve) arrives via the riverboat Mississippi, she does not resemble her photograph nor the woman he imagined from her letters. Louis is nonetheless enchanted by Julie's beauty and they marry. Then Julie vanishes mysteriously, absconding with all of the holdings in Louis's bank account. It is soon learned from Berthe Roussel (Nelly Borgeaud) that her sister is missing and that someone impersonated her on the arrival boat. Louis and Berthe hire a private detective, Comolli (Michel Bouquet), to apprehend the impostor and find the missing Julie. Later, Louis discovers his wife is in Antibes and tracks her to her hotel room where she confesses her name is Marion and was partner-in-crime with Richard (Roland Thenot), who robbed and murdered the real Julie. Louis, still infatuated with Marion, forgives her but soon the couple find themselves on the run from the police who want to arrest Marion for murder. It is only after the couple have fled to an isolated cabin in the French Alps that Louis discovers Marion's true nature. According to Truffaut, Mississippi Mermaid was "above all the story of a degradation of love." He also said the "film had been offered to me two years previously with Brigitte Bardot. I had adored the novel, but I had said, 'Bardot, out of the question. It will be Catherine Deneuve or no one.' I waited patiently in the wings and, as soon as the rights were available, I bought them with money lent me by Jeanne Moreau...and I shot the film as I saw fit, good or bad..." In Francois Truffaut: Correspondence 1945-1984, the director described his first meeting with Jean-Paul Belmondo who he had long wished to use in a film: "He [Belmondo] greatly liked the novel, the characters and the plot. The only reservation he indicated to me concerned the character's age, which is indeed more advanced in the book. I believe I set his mind at rest on this point by explaining to him how I saw things, and he then expressed his wish to make the film...I told him that the adaptation would follow the book quite closely and he showed no desire to delay his acceptance until he had read the script, which would in any case be physically impossible since we will have to begin pre-production in two weeks and I plan to write most of the dialogue during the shoot, as I have almost always done in my French films." From the start, Truffaut had to balance the two acting styles of Belmondo and Deneuve who were quite different in their preparation. In an interview in The New York Times Truffaut said, "He [Belmondo] starts out in a comic vein and the disparity with what I want is so great that I tell myself, 'I'm going to have to explain this, it's going to be difficult, it's going to take a long time,' and not at all, he says, 'Oh, you want it sadder,' and within seconds he changes it completely. That's because he has the dual theatre-movie training. He knows how to emphasize a line and how to throw a line away, whereas Catherine Deneuve is exclusively cinematic, completely untheatrical, every intonation is even. So sometimes you have to say, 'This sentence is important': you have to bring her out. I think they go well together; they're good to look at. I made Mississippi Mermaid in Cinemascope, so I could have them both on the screen most of the time. In a lot of American movies with two big stars you have a problem of vanity; each star is filmed separately so you can put little lights in their eyes, and you get the impression they didn't act together. But I didn't want one to be more important than the other so I kept them together." Truffaut's source of inspiration throughout the filming of Mississippi Mermaid was, according to John Wakeham in World Film Directors, "Jean Renoir, to whom the film is dedicated because...every time he got stuck with the improvisation, he asked himself how Renoir would have solved the problem. But notwithstanding the model, and ample allusions to the master himself - the thematic link with La Chienne [1931], an open ending like La Grande Illusion [1937], clips from La Marseillaise [1938], and an allusion to Le Crime de M. Lange [1936] in the title of a film within the film," Mississippi Mermaid also paid homages to writer Honore de Balzac, directors Nicholas Ray, Jean Cocteau and Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo (1958), actor Humphrey Bogart, and a Cahiers Du Cinema editor whose name Comolli was used for the detective played by Michel Bouquet. There are even parallels and references to Truffaut's own work such as Shoot the Piano Player (1960) - the same mountain cabin hideout was used for the snowy climax in Mississippi Mermaid - and The Bride Wore Black (1968), which featured a heroine who was both a vision of beauty and a destroying angel to men, not unlike Deneuve's siren. (The Bride Wore Black was also based on a William Irish novel.) Despite Truffaut's emotional and artistic investment in the film, the critical response to Mississippi Mermaid was decidedly mixed during its initial release. Variety reported that "Truffaut has come up with an uneven film mixing a love story, femme duality, suspense, but not quite getting the intertwining of wry tenderness, cohesive characterization and punctilious but charming insights that marked his recent pix." British critic Derek Elly wrote, "The director seems unsure whether to make a thriller, an homage, or a love story," but added that "beneath the trimmings, it is one of his most personal works...Truffaut's poem to the eternal bitch-goddess figure - and more particularly to Catherine Deneuve." (According to Truffaut's co-scenarist Bernard Revon, Deneuve was "the most beautiful love of his life."). Truffaut was diplomatic about the criticisms, admitting that Mississippi Mermaid suffered a lack of cohesion because, for the sake of economy, he had to omit sections from the novel that would have added clarity and plausibility to the narrative and characters. He also realized that the casting of Belmondo and Deneuve created expectations in the audience that weren't met by his treatment of the material. "Perhaps what I had tried to do before in Tirez sur le pianiste [Shoot the Piano Player] and La Mariée était en noir [The Bride Wore Black] - combine an adventure story and a love story - worked less well here....as those who don't like it constitute 95%, I have to admit something went wrong." Since its 1970 release, however, Mississippi Mermaid has been critically reappraised by many critics. David Thomson in The New Biographical Dictionary of Film wrote that it "actually masters Hitchcockian themes and turns into a rhapsody on a fatal obsession." And at a festival of Truffaut's work in 1999 at San Francisco's Castro Theatre, Edward Guthmann of the San Francisco Chronicle wrote "The decision to open the retrospective with "Mississippi Mermaid'' might seem odd, since the film was poorly received when released in the United States and has been held in such low esteem in the Truffaut canon...A classic case of a film being altered by overzealous cutting, ``Mermaid'' was released in the United States with 13 minutes missing. Now restored, those scenes give the film a clarity it lacked before and flesh out the characters in ways that justify their actions...The pieces all fit, and the result is a cool combo of film noir, star vehicle and picaresque romance. It's vintage Truffaut, and a great way to get acquainted or reacquainted with one of cinema's true masters." Producers: Marcel Berbert and Francois Truffaut Director: Francois Truffaut Screenplay: Francois Truffaut; William Irish (novel "Waltz into Darkness") Cinematography: Denys Clerval Art Direction: Claude Pignot (Production Design, Set Decoration) Music: Antoine Duhamel Film Editing: Agnes Guillemot Cast: Louis Mahe (Jean-Paul Belmondo), Julie Roussel/Marion Vergano (Catherine Deneuve), Berthe (Nelly Borgeaud), Landlady (Martine Ferriere), Jardine (Marcel Berbert) C-124m. Closed captioning. by Jeff Stafford SOURCES: Truffaut by Don Allen Francois Truffaut by Annette Insdorf Francois Truffaut: Correspondence 1945-1984 edited by Gilles Jacob & Claude de Givray World Film Directors, Vol. II, 1945-1985 by John Wakeham IMDB

Quotes

Attends! Je vais t'expliquer. Attends!
- Louis
Je t'attends.
- Marion
Je vais plus te parler de ta beaute. Je peux meme te dire que t'es moche, si tu veux. Je vais essayer de te decrire comme si tu etais une photo. Ou une peinture. Tais-toi. Ton visage... Ton visage est une paysage. Tu vois, je suis neutre et impartial. Il y a les deux yeux... Deux petits lacs marrons.
- Louis
Marron-verts.
- Marion
Deux petits lacs marron-verts. Ton front, c'est une plaine. Ton nez... Une petite montagne, petite. Ta bouche, un volcan. Ouvre un peu. J'aime voir tes dents. Non, non, pas trop. Voila! Comme ca. Tu sais ce qui sort de ta bouche, quand tu es mechante? Des crapauds! Si, si, des crapauds. Et des colliers de perles, quand tu es gentille. Attends!
- Louis
Bois ca, mon cheri. Ca ira mieux.
- Marion
Remplis-le jusqu'en haut. Je sais ce que tu es en train de faire. Je l'accepte. Je regrette pas de t'avoir rencontree. Je regrette pas d'avoir tue un homme pour toi. Je regrette pas t'aimer. Je regrette rien, seulement maintenant ca me fais tres mal dans le ventre. Ca me brule partout. Alors je voudrais que ca aille vite. Tres vite. Remplis-le!
- Louis
Tu savais tout et tu te laissais faire! J'ai honte! J'ai honte! J'ai honte! Aucune femme ne merite d'etre aimee comme ca. Je suis indigne. Mais il n'est pas trop tard. Je vais te soigner. Tu vas vivre. Nous allons partir loin d'ici. Tous les deux. J'ai assez de force pour deux. Tu vivras, tu m'entends? Tu vivras! Personne ne te prendra a moi. Je t'aime, Louis. Je t'aime. Peut-etre que tu ne me crois pas, mas il y a des choses incroyables qui sont vraies. Courage, mon amour. Nous allons partir loin d'ici, et puis nous resterons toujours ensemble... Si tu veux encore de moi.
- Marion
Mais c'est toi que je veux. Rien que toi. Telle que tu es, absolument. Allez, pleure pas. C'est ton bonheur que je veux, pas tes larmes.
- Louis
Je viens a l'amour, Louis. J'ai mal, Louis. Ca fait mal. Est-ce que c'est ca l'amour? Est-ce que l'amour fait mal?
- Marion
Oui, ca fait mal.
- Louis
Elle etait pas mal, cette cabane.
- Marion
Tu es si belle. Quand je te regarde, c'est une souffrance.
- Louis
Pourtant hier, tu disais qu c'etait une joie.
- Marion
C'est une joie et une souffrance.
- Louis
Je vous aime.
- Marion
Je te crois.
- Louis

Trivia

The film is dedicated to Jean Renoir.

Notes

Location scenes filmed in Réunion, Antibes, Aix-en-Provence, Lyons, and near Grenoble. Dedicated to Jean Renoir; a clip from Renoir's La Marseillaise appears in the film in an exposition of Réunion's history. Paris opening: June 1969 as La sirène du Mississippi; released in Italy in 1970(?) as La mia droga si chiama Julie.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1999

Released in United States August 16, 1985

Released in United States on Video September 25, 1991

Released in United States Spring April 1970

Re-released in United States January 15, 1999

Shown at "Truffaut Plus", a film Society of Lincoln Center Retrospective August 16, 1985.

The 1999 re-release is the director's cut, restoring 13 minutes that were excised from its original U.S. release in 1969.

The character "Comolli", the detective, is named after Truffaut's editor at "Cahiers du Cinema" when the director was one of the critics there.

Dyaliscope

Released in United States 1999 (Shown in New York City (Film Forum) as part of program "Tout Truffaut" April 23 - June 24, 1999.)

Re-released in United States January 15, 1999 (Film Forum; New York City)

Released in United States Spring April 1970

Released in United States August 16, 1985 (Shown at "Truffaut Plus", a film Society of Lincoln Center Retrospective August 16, 1985.)

Released in United States on Video September 25, 1991