Mexicana


1h 23m 1945

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 15, 1945
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,500ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

Mexican singer "Pepe" Luis Almarena Villarreal is tired of his heartthrob status among his adoring female fans, who tear his clothes and chase him following every performance. After an appearance on a radio program, Pepe is again mobbed and returns to his hotel room with his manager, Esteban Guzman. Pepe insists that he wants to quit singing, but before he can finish his discussion with Guzman, he must eject his most ardent admirer, Cuban dancer Lupita Lopez, who has once again snuck into his room. Pepe's irritation inspires Guzman to remark that if Pepe had a wife, his fans would leave him alone. Determined to find Pepe a fake wife, Guzman discusses the subject with Beagle, the manager of noted American musical comedy star Alison Calvert. Beagle is upset because Pepe is refusing to appear with Alison in the upcoming Pan-American Festival, which could greatly help Alison's career, unless he is successful in his quest for a wife. Beagle and Guzman conspire to persuade Alison to play Pepe's wife, which she adamantly refuses to do. Alison believes that Pepe, of whom she has never heard, is merely trying to use her to increase his own prestige, but when Beagle laughingly replies that Pepe is much more famous than she is, and that Pepe needs her in order to take a break from women, she takes umbrage at Pepe's conceit and agrees to the scheme. After Guzman tells the press that Pepe and Alison married in secret several years previously, a huge crowd awaits her arrival in Mexico. Jealous of their attention to Alison, Pepe sings and steals away her fans, thereby angering Alison. Believing that the other is just a conceited windbag, Alison and Pepe continue their feud to the hotel, where they are shown to the bridal suite. Alison refuses to let Pepe stay in the suite, and, due to the vigilant presence of Lupita, Pepe is forced to spend the night in a supply closet. The feud escalates as Pepe and Alison try to force each other to be the first to quit their "marriage," until Beagle and Guzman are driven to despair. An offhand remark of Alison's companion, Bunny Ford, saves the day, however, when she mentions that a child would restore the "marriage." The managers then send the singers to a rehearsal of the Mexican Children's Choir, where their mutual love of children finally makes them soften toward each other. On the drive back, they agree to be friends and carry on with their phony marriage until after the festival. When they reach the hotel, however, they discover that Guzman and Beagle have taken two children from the choir and told the press that they are Alison and Pepe's twin son and daughter. An infuriated Alison mistakenly assumes that Pepe has played another mean trick on her, and while he tries to explain, Lupita enters with a group of reporters. Having gotten Bunny drunk, Lupita learned the truth about the situation and has now alerted the press, who hound Pepe. Alison sneaks away during the confusion, and later, a heartbroken Pepe confesses to Guzman that he is in love with the lovely American. While Pepe searches everywhere for Alison, she stays at the secluded home of sympathetic conductor Laredo, to whom she confesses that she loves Pepe. Guzman advises Alison to return to Pepe, and on the opening night of the festival, Pepe fulfills his commitment to appear, although his melancholy prevents him from enjoying himself. As he sings a romantic song, however, Pepe is thrilled to hear Alison join in, and after the sweethearts finish their number, they hide behind Pepe's hat and kiss.

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 15, 1945
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,500ft (10 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Although a August 2, 1943 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that Republic had purchased a property called Mexicana, written by Martin Martinez, and was considering producing it as a Broadway musical before filming it, Martinez' work does not appear to be related to this picture. Other Hollywood Reporter news items note that Albert J. Cohen was originally scheduled to produce the film, and that cameraman John Alton was in charge of obtaining the background and atmospheric shots of Mexico used in the picture. Although Hollywood Reporter news items include Mexican actress Zedra Conde and Aaron González, the orchestra leader at the Beverly Hills Hotel, in the cast, their appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. Mexicana marked the screen debut of Cuban dancer Estelita Rodríguez. In 1949, the film was re-edited and re-released as Beyond the Rio Grande, and in 1950, was again re-issued as Beyond the Border.