Freedom Fighter


1h 31m 1988

Brief Synopsis

Colonel Virelli and a team of mercenaries are hired by an African nation to dispose of a tribe of people who are trying to block a proposed dam. However, after the men learn that the tribe is merely fighting for the lives and livelihoods of its people, the mercenaries must decide which side they sho

Film Details

Also Known As
Freedom Fighters, Mercenary Fighter, Mercenary Fighters
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Burbank Studios
Distribution Company
Paris Filmes
Location
Zimbabwe; South Africa

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m

Synopsis

Colonel Virelli and a team of mercenaries are hired by an African nation to dispose of a tribe of people who are trying to block a proposed dam. However, after the men learn that the tribe is merely fighting for the lives and livelihoods of its people, the mercenaries must decide which side they should be fighting on.

Crew

Michael Alden

Post-Production Supervisor

Dick Alexander

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Ed Anders

Stunts

Terry Asbury

Additional Dialogue

Terry Asbury

Screenplay

Terry Asbury

2nd Assistant Director

Wenden K Baldwin

Title Design

Raymond Bark

1st Assistant Director

Hugh Barrett

Set Dresser

Howard Bashew

Director Of Photography 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Dianne Beatty

Production Coordinator

Barbara Bergman

Production Accountant

John Bergman

Sound Recording Mixer

Jojo Bergman

Boom Operator

Jeff Birch

Aerial Pilot 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Callie Bristow

Casting (Additional)

Connie Brown

Dialogue Coach

Leonardo Coen Cagli

Production Designer

Kimbo Campbell

Stunts

Elton Chatz

Stunts

Lyndsey Coates

Wardrobe 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Gary Copeland

Camp Manager

Chip Cronkite

2nd Assistant Editor

Tracy Crystal

Makeup

B J Davis

Stunt Coordinator

Tyron Deche

Stunts

Alfie Defreitas

Other

Andrew Deutsch

Screenwriter

Maria Domingo

Apprentice Editor

Dave Dunn-yarker

Aerial Photography

Thys Duplooy

Stunts

Claire Dykins

Continuity 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Donald Fair

Property Master

Trevor Fish

Location Manager

Rolf Fleischmann

1st Assistant Editor

Les Fresholtz

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Michael L Games

Production Manager

Eitan Gartushka

Chief Gaffer

Ludwig Gertzen

Grip

Yoram Globus

Producer

Menahem Golan

Producer

Dean Goodhill

Editor

Michael Goodhill

Editor

David Gur

Stills

Lisa Hart

Set Dresser

Carol Hickson

Production Coordinator

Pieter Hubearb

Sound Editor

Alain Jakubowicz

Post-Production Supervisor

Melvin Jones

Stunts

Morris Kaplan

Stunts

Kelly Kerby

Special Effects Supervisor

Patrick Kerby

Special Effects Crew Member

Richard Kille

Production Assistant

Graham Kolbe

Set Dresser

Avi Koren

Other

Lynn Kwitt

Publicist

Larry Larson

Transportation Coordinator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Mark Lawrie

1st Assistant 2nd Unit Director (2nd Unit)

Avi Lerner

Executive Producer

Maria Lesebo

Wardrobe Assistant

Rob Leslie

Caterer

Shmuel Levi

Key Grip

Scully Levine

Aerial Pilot 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Dory Lubliner

Music Editor

Dory Lubliner

Associate Editor

Garth Lucas

Grip

Peter Macdougall

Other

Joe Mafela

Casting (Crowds)

Veronique Malherbe

Production Assistant

Billy Mashigo

Stunts

Isaac Mavimbela

Stunts

Michelle Meyburgh

Wardrobe Assistant

Jayen Meyer

Set Dresser

David Meyerowitz

Grip

Guy Micheletti

Grip

Robert Miscia

Hairstyles

Harold Morgan

Music

Dirk Mostert

Camera Operator

Gerry Mostert

Production Manager 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Marcelle Mouton

2nd Assistant Editor

Shadrach Oepeng

Gaffer Assistant

Chris Olley

Stunts

Bill Olmstead

Aerial Pilot 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Dominic Orpen

Production Assistant

Dick Oswald

Sound Editor

Paul Otten

Other

Rocky Palmer

Other

John Pasternak

Stunts

Monte Perlin

Stunts

Bill Phillips

Sound Editor Supervisor

John Phillips

Sound Editor

Vern Poore

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Gus Pringle

Stunts

Liz Quinn

Property Master

Brian Rayner

Other

Mary Reid

Makeup

Mickey Rooney

Set Dresser

Nico Sachse

3rd Assistant Director

Hall Sanders

Sound Editor

Bud Schaetzle

From Story

Bud Schaetzle

Screenwriter

Danny Schneor

Director Of Photography

Lana Schwartz

Production Assistant

Martin Shaban

Casting Coordinator

Paul Siebert

Stunts

Heather Sisson

Accountant Assistant

Danny Smart

Gaffer Assistant

Robyn Smith

Costume Designer

Cesar Soldenhof

Gaffer Assistant

Danielle Stevens

Continuity

Dymphna Straatman

Transportation Coordinator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Joe Swana

Gaffer Assistant

Omer Tal

Editor

Gys Ten Haaft

Grip

Bruce Thomas

Gaffer Assistant

Dean Tschetter

Screenwriter

Dean Tschetter

From Story

Dawie Van Heerden

Other

Massimo Vico

Special Effects Crew Member

Gerhard Voges

Set Dresser

Anton Voster

Other

Rachia Wellner

2nd Assistant Editor

Mark West

2nd Assistant Director

Russel Wilken

Stunts

Sandra Wilson

Other

Rony Yacov

Executive In Charge Of Production

Caroline Zelder

Casting Associate

Tivi Zichroni

1st Assistant Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
Freedom Fighters, Mercenary Fighter, Mercenary Fighters
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Burbank Studios
Distribution Company
Paris Filmes
Location
Zimbabwe; South Africa

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m

Articles

Ron O'Neal (1937-2003) - Ron O'Neal (1937-2003)


Ron O'Neal, the handsome, athletic black actor who shot to fame in the '70s for his role as the Harlem drug dealer "Youngblood Priest" in the cult flick, Superfly (1972), died of cancer in Los Angeles on January 14th. He was 66.

O'Neal was born on September 1, 1937 in Utica, New York, but he grew up in Cleveland. After graduating high school in 1955, he joined the city's widely acclaimed Karamu House, an experimental interracial theatrical troupe. During his nine-year stint with the playhouse, he had roles in such varied productions as A Raisin in the Sun, A Streetcar Named Desire and Kiss Me Kate.

After moving to New York City in the mid-'60s, he taught acting classes in Harlem and performed in summer stock. He came to critical notice in the off-Broadway production of Charles Gordone's Pulitzer Prize-winning No Place to be Somebody where he earned an Obie Award (the off-Broadway Tony) for his work. The producers of Superfly saw him in that production and cast him in the film's lead role of "Youngblood Priest". The film was a box-office smash, and O'Neal, looking slick and ultra-stylish in his big fedora hat, leather boots, flowing scarf, and floor length trench coat, became a pop culture icon of the "blaxsploitation" genre overnight.

O'Neal would try his hand at directing when he took on the sequel Superfly T.N.T. (1973). Unfortunately, his lack of experience showed as the poorly directed film lacked its predecessor's wit and pace, and proved a resounding commercial flop. Sadly, O'Neal's fame (as well as the blaxsploitation genre itself), would inevitably fade, and by the decade's end, O'Neal would be co-starring in such B-films as When a Stranger Calls, and the Chuck Norris actioner A Force of One (both 1979).

His fortunes did brighten in the mid-'80s with television, earning semi-regular roles in two of the more popular shows of the day: The Equalizer (1985-89) and A Different World (1987-93). Better still, as scholars and film fans rediscovered his performance in Superfly, O'Neal gathered some movie work again. He was cast alongside fellow blaxsploitation stars Pam Grier, Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Richard Roundtree in the genre's tribute film Original Gangstas (1996); the film was a modest hit, and O'Neal made the rounds in a few more urban action thrillers, most notably his final film On the Edge (2002), co-starring rap and televisions star, Ice-T. O'Neal is survived by his wife Audrey Pool O'Neal, and sister, Kathleen O'Neal.

by Michael T. Toole
Ron O'neal  (1937-2003) - Ron O'neal (1937-2003)

Ron O'Neal (1937-2003) - Ron O'Neal (1937-2003)

Ron O'Neal, the handsome, athletic black actor who shot to fame in the '70s for his role as the Harlem drug dealer "Youngblood Priest" in the cult flick, Superfly (1972), died of cancer in Los Angeles on January 14th. He was 66. O'Neal was born on September 1, 1937 in Utica, New York, but he grew up in Cleveland. After graduating high school in 1955, he joined the city's widely acclaimed Karamu House, an experimental interracial theatrical troupe. During his nine-year stint with the playhouse, he had roles in such varied productions as A Raisin in the Sun, A Streetcar Named Desire and Kiss Me Kate. After moving to New York City in the mid-'60s, he taught acting classes in Harlem and performed in summer stock. He came to critical notice in the off-Broadway production of Charles Gordone's Pulitzer Prize-winning No Place to be Somebody where he earned an Obie Award (the off-Broadway Tony) for his work. The producers of Superfly saw him in that production and cast him in the film's lead role of "Youngblood Priest". The film was a box-office smash, and O'Neal, looking slick and ultra-stylish in his big fedora hat, leather boots, flowing scarf, and floor length trench coat, became a pop culture icon of the "blaxsploitation" genre overnight. O'Neal would try his hand at directing when he took on the sequel Superfly T.N.T. (1973). Unfortunately, his lack of experience showed as the poorly directed film lacked its predecessor's wit and pace, and proved a resounding commercial flop. Sadly, O'Neal's fame (as well as the blaxsploitation genre itself), would inevitably fade, and by the decade's end, O'Neal would be co-starring in such B-films as When a Stranger Calls, and the Chuck Norris actioner A Force of One (both 1979). His fortunes did brighten in the mid-'80s with television, earning semi-regular roles in two of the more popular shows of the day: The Equalizer (1985-89) and A Different World (1987-93). Better still, as scholars and film fans rediscovered his performance in Superfly, O'Neal gathered some movie work again. He was cast alongside fellow blaxsploitation stars Pam Grier, Fred Williamson, Jim Brown and Richard Roundtree in the genre's tribute film Original Gangstas (1996); the film was a modest hit, and O'Neal made the rounds in a few more urban action thrillers, most notably his final film On the Edge (2002), co-starring rap and televisions star, Ice-T. O'Neal is survived by his wife Audrey Pool O'Neal, and sister, Kathleen O'Neal. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring April 8, 1988

Began shooting November 24, 1986.

Released in United States Spring April 8, 1988