The Marines Are Coming


1h 8m 1934

Brief Synopsis

When Lt. "Wild Bill" Traynor, bad boy of the Marine Corps, arrives at a San Diego Marine Base, he is surprised to discover he has been assigned to duty under his old rival, Captain Benton (Conrad Nagel). While eluding the advances of Rosita (Armida), a Latin dancer, Bill becomes involved with Benton's fiancee, Dorothy Manning (Esther Ralston), whom he quickly wins and Benton accepts the impending marriage. On his wedding eve, Bill, in the company of Rosita, becomes involved in a fracas in a gambling joint in nearby Tia Juana. Rosita disappears and Dorothy calls off the wedding. As Dorthy sails for Latin America, Bill resigns in disgrace from the Marines, but re-enters as a Private. Ordered to duty in Ponta Miguel, Bill discovers that Dorothy's father (Hale Hamilton) is the governor. His old nemesis Benton has Bill sent to the guardhouse and Bill is vowing revenge when he is released, only to find that Benton is being held prisoner by a jungle bandit known as The Torch (George Regas.) Posing as a drunk and renegade, Bill enters the bandit's camp and, by mending a disabled machine gun, wins the confidence of the bandit leader. Bill later mans the gun against the bandits who have prepared a trap for the Marine patrol searching for Benton.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Marines Have Landed
Release Date
Nov 20, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Mascot Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Mascot Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Burbank--Union Air Terminal, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

Following his latest romantic intrigue, Lieutenant "Wild Bill" Traylor returns to his Marine base in San Diego and discovers that he has been assigned to his old rival, the respectable Captain Benton. Although tracked from Alaska by his ardent admirer Rosita, a Latin dancer, Bill pursues Dorothy Manning, who is engaged to Benton. Eventually Bill convinces Dorothy to break her engagement to Benton and marry him, and Benton accepts his defeat with grace. On the eve of their wedding, however, Bill and his orderly, Buck Martin, are caught in a gambling house brawl in Tijuana. That same night, Dorothy sees Bill with Rosita and sails for Latin America without her fiancé. Because of the brawl, Bill is forced to resign his commission, but re-enlists with Buck as a private and is sent to a base in Ponta Miguel, where Dorothy's father is the governor. Bill is confined to the guardhouse by Benton, who has been transferred to the base, and vows revenge on his superior. However, when Benton is captured by The Torch and his gang of bandits, Bill pretends to be drunk in the village and falls in with two intoxicated bandits, who take him to their fort. There, Bill feigns hate for Benton and convinces The Torch that he has turned renegade. Then, as The Torch makes plans to ambush Benton's rescue patrol, Bill overwhelms him, mans a machine gun and, with Benton's help, holds off the other bandits until the Marines arrive. After the rescue, Bill reunites with a forgiving Dorothy but, realizing that she belongs with the more virtuous Benton, feigns disinterest in her and embraces Rosita. Bill then leaves for Washington, D.C. to retake his commission examination and return to the faithful Rosita as an officer.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Marines Have Landed
Release Date
Nov 20, 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Mascot Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Mascot Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Burbank--Union Air Terminal, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 8m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was The Marines Have Landed. The film was also reviewed as Marines Are Coming. According to a pre-production ad, story writers John Rathmell and Colbert Clark were former Marines. According to a Hollywood Reporter production chart, Clark and another writer, Wallace MacDonald, worked on the screenplay with credited scenarist James Gruen. Their contribution to the final screenplay has not been determined. Hollywood Reporter production charts add the following actors to the cast: Chris-Pin Martin, Wes Warner, Bill Hoyt, Frank Leyva, Gino Corrado, Joe Dominguez, Harvey Irwin, S. W. Robinson, Gene Daguna and Yancey Lane. Their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Atmospheric scenes for the picture were shot at Union Air Terminal in Burbank, according to news items. For those scenes, Ernest Miller acted as cinematographer while William Nobles operated the camera. The Variety reviewer complained about the "Russian accent of some of the Central America characters" in the film.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1934

Released in United States 1934