The Mad Miss Manton


1h 5m 1938
The Mad Miss Manton

Brief Synopsis

A daffy socialite gets her friends mixed up in a murder investigation.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Crime
Release Date
Oct 21, 1938
Premiere Information
Milwaukie (WI) opening: 8 Oct 1938
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Burbank--Columbia Ranch, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Sound
Mono (RCA Victor System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Late one night, Melsa Manton, a young heiress and leader of the "Park Avenue Pranksters," sees Ronnie Belden fleeing from George and Sheila Lane's house and, investigating, finds a diamond brooch and a corpse inside. Terrified, she runs to telephone the police, but when they inspect the house, the body and brooch are gone. Convinced that Melsa is playing a trick, Lieutenant Mike Brent dismisses her declarations, and the next day, Melsa reads a scathing editorial about the incident in the Morning Clarion . After threatening the author, editor Peter Ames, with a libel suit, Melsa calls the other six pranksters together to locate the missing corpse. While scouring the Lane house, the girls stumble across Peter and promptly gag and tie him, and then move on to Ronnie's apartment, where they find the brooch and Ronnie's body in the refrigerator. After the pranksters deposit the new corpse at the Clarion , Brent drills a scornful Melsa about Ronnie. Grateful for Peter's unexpected help in locating her lawyer, Melsa reveals to him that she has the brooch. As they are leaving the station, however, Brent apprehends Melsa and the jewel, just as the police discover George Lane's body in Ronnie's car. Now suspecting the absent Sheila Lane, who was having an affair with Ronnie, Peter, the police and the pranksters descend on a charity ball that is co-sponsored by the widow. Melsa, overhearing Peter and Brent discussing Lane's life insurance policy, takes prankster Helen and sneaks over to Lane's brokerage firm, where they are met by Peter and a professional safecracker. In the company safe, they find incriminating papers about Sheila's first husband, criminal Eddie Norris, who then shows up with a gun. After Peter overwhelms Eddie, Melsa, who believes Eddie is innocent, conducts travel time tests to prove his murder alibi to the police. However, when Melsa receives threatening phone calls and Peter is shot at from a passing car, the police decide to use Melsa as a decoy. In the end, Melsa determines that Eddie actually was the killer and is saved from his bullets by Peter, who has finally won her stubborn heart.

Cast

Barbara Stanwyck

Melsa Manton

Henry Fonda

Peter Ames

Sam Levene

Lieutenant Mike Brent

Frances Mercer

Helen Frayne

Stanley Ridges

Edward Norris

Whitney Bourne

Pat James

Leona Maricle

Sheila Lane

James Burke

Sullivan

Penny Singleton

Frances Glesk

Vicki Lester

Kit Beverly

Ann Evers

Lee Wilson

Catherine O'quinn

Dora Fenton

Linda Perry

Myra Frost

Eleanor Hansen

Jane

Hattie Mcdaniel

Hilda

Paul Guilfoyle

Bat Regan

Kay Sutton

Gloria Hamilton

Miles Mander

Mr. Thomas

John Qualen

Subway watchman

Grady Sutton

District attorney's secretary

Olin Howland

Mr. X

Leonard Mudie

Newspaper owner

Byron Foulger

Assistant news editor

Buster Slaven

Messenger boy

Harry Bailey

Booking sergeant

Charles Halton

Poppsie

Gerald Pierce

Newsboy

Otto Fries

Homocide man

Jack Rice

Doctor

Walter Sander

Reporter

Clarence Wilson

Norris' attorney

Robert Middlemass

District Attorney

Paul Everton

Newspaper editor

Tommy Mullens

Cab driver

Lynton Brent

Clerk

Virginia Dabney

Secretary

Wade Crosby

Writer

John Butler

Writer

Ted Oliver

Policeman

Frank Anthony

Policeman

George Magrill

Policeman

Mike Stark

Policeman

Douglas Williams

Policeman

Emory Parnell

Doorman

Matt Mchugh

Waiter

Pierre Watkin

Mr. Fenton

Irving Bacon

Mr. Spangler

William Corson

Ronnie Beldon

Harry Campbell

Harold

Don Kerr

Buck Mack

George Denormand

Robert Mitchell

Charles Trowbridge

Hal Finley

Harry Fleischman

Ed Chandler

Peggy Carroll

Lillian Miles

Fred Rapport

Barrett Whitelaw

Larry Steers

Jack Arnold

Cy Slocum

James Carlyle

Charles Sullivan

Harvey Perry

Jane Woodworth

Bill Tannen

Tom Costello

Carlie Taylor

Ed Thomas

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Crime
Release Date
Oct 21, 1938
Premiere Information
Milwaukie (WI) opening: 8 Oct 1938
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Burbank--Columbia Ranch, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Sound
Mono (RCA Victor System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

The Mad Miss Manton



In The Lady Eve (1941), co-stars Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda play out Preston Sturges' sparkling dialogue and witty screwball situations in one of the most notable pairings in the genre; arguably, their onscreen chemistry is the best in any Sturges film. The Mad Miss Manton (1938) was released three years earlier; it has been called a dress rehearsal for the later classic, but it can also stand on its own as a delightful and neglected entry in the comedy-mystery subgenre.

Park Avenue heiress Melsa Manton (Barbara Stanwyck) is walking her poodles in the wee hours of the morning, when she sees a man dart out of luxury apartment building on 14th Street and speed off in a convertible. Curious, she investigates and discovers a dead man lying in a pool of blood. When the police arrive ten minutes later, they meet Miss Manton on the street below. Lt. Mike Brent (Sam Levene) and his men have a difficult time believing Manton's story - for one thing, she is dressed as Little Bo Peep under her overcoat, having just come from a costume party, and more importantly, the body has disappeared without a trace. Newspaper editor Peter Ames (Henry Fonda) sees this latest incident as another in a series of pranks that Manton and her debutante girlfriends pull to gain publicity (in the name of charity). Melsa goes to Ames' office, slaps him, and announces her intention to sue the paper for libel. To the bemusement and irritation of her maid Hilda (Hattie McDaniel), Melsa and her seven society girlfriends ignore anonymous threats while investigating the murder, dragging Ames into the proceedings as well.

Barbara Stanwyck became involved in the RKO semi-screwball comedy when Katherine Hepburn turned it down. Hepburn had already appeared in an RKO comedy earlier the same year, in Howard Hawks' Bringing Up Baby (1938). That film didn't exactly set the box-office on fire, so Hepburn was not anxious to make a follow-up. Stanwyck, who was on suspension at RKO and in need of a film assignment at the time, inherited the role. For the male lead, Henry Fonda was borrowed from Walter Wanger Productions. As Axel Madsin wrote in his biography Stanwyck, Fonda "...hated his role, hated the script's sneering repartee with his leading lady, and tried his best to ignore everybody." Fonda himself later said, "I was so mad on this picture - I resented it." The script, written by Philip G. Epstein from an unpublished novel by Wilson Collison, is clearly meant as a female star vehicle, and Fonda probably did not appreciate the scenes in which he was beaten up by eight flighty debutantes!

Director Leigh Jason keeps the comedy elements of The Mad Miss Manton sprightly, but he is also willing to let the mystery angle have some bite. The cinematography by Nicholas Musuraca (who was to later help define the look of Film Noir in Out of the Past - 1947), is appropriately dark and ominous during the menacing scenes. Jason also had a large cast to contend with; as Ella Smith writes in Starring Miss Barbara Stanwyck, "...the picture was an exercise in group directing. There were seven lively girls surrounding Stanwyck, and most of them - except for Frances Mercer, who played the largest of the roles - had never been before a camera...it was a challenge just to keep them straight. There was a temptation to put numbers on their backs, but Jason resisted and gave them bits of business that would keep them in the scene." Indeed, one of the socialites is forever finding something to eat, thinking nothing of eating a sandwich in a kitchen in which a corpse has just fallen from an icebox. Another of the debutantes, Dora, is forever politically-minded; in one scene Melsa is attempting to have the girls split up to search a house. She assigns Helen to go upstairs, upon which Helen replies, "Oh, no! I was never much of an individualist. If the upstairs has to be searched, we'll search it together." At this, Dora says, "Why, that's communism!"

Filming on The Mad Miss Manton was sometimes a trying experience. Exteriors of New York City were shot on the Columbia Ranch in Burbank, California in mid-summer, forcing the debutantes to run around in fur stoles in 100-degree heat. There was also a one-week shutdown of production when Stanwyck took ill. Director Jason had the highest regard for his leading lady though; he was later quoted as saying, "I've worked with perhaps eight or nine hundred actors and actresses. Barbara Stanwyck is the nicest."

In 1938, African-American character actress Hattie McDaniel was only one year away from her signature role as Mammy in Gone with the Wind (1939). In The Mad Miss Manton she plays Hilda, the house servant to the title character, but she is not exactly the subservient type: in fact, she gets in several great lines making fun of the flighty debutantes. At one point, Miss Manton mildly berates Hilda for being rude to one of her guests; "I didn't ask her up" is Hilda's reply. One of the socialites says, "Comes the revolution, and we'll start being exploited by our help." Melsa shoots a glance at Hilda and says, "In my home, the revolution is here." A few eyebrows were raised when Hilda, on standing orders from Melsa, tosses water in the face of Peter Ames when he shows up at the door. Hilda approves of him as a suitor though, and says, "It was orders. But I used distilled water!" No doubt such memorable supporting roles as the one she played in The Mad Miss Manton helped Hattie McDaniel win the Oscar® the following year.

Producer: P. J. Wolfson
Director: Leigh Jason
Screenplay: Philip G. Epstein, Story by Wilson Collison
Cinematography: Nicholas Musuraca
Film Editing: George Hively
Art Direction: Van Nest Polglase
Music: Roy Webb
Costume Design: Edward Stevenson
Cast: Barbara Stanwyck (Melsa Manton), Henry Fonda (Peter Ames), Sam Levene (Lieutenant Mike Brent), Frances Mercer (Helen Frayne), Stanley Ridges (Edward 'Eddie' Norris), Whitney Bourne (Pat James), Vickie Lester (Kit Beverly), Ann Evers (Lee Wilson), Catherine O'Quinn (Dora Fenton), Hattie McDaniel (Hilda).
BW-80m.

by John M. Miller

The Mad Miss Manton

The Mad Miss Manton

In The Lady Eve (1941), co-stars Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda play out Preston Sturges' sparkling dialogue and witty screwball situations in one of the most notable pairings in the genre; arguably, their onscreen chemistry is the best in any Sturges film. The Mad Miss Manton (1938) was released three years earlier; it has been called a dress rehearsal for the later classic, but it can also stand on its own as a delightful and neglected entry in the comedy-mystery subgenre. Park Avenue heiress Melsa Manton (Barbara Stanwyck) is walking her poodles in the wee hours of the morning, when she sees a man dart out of luxury apartment building on 14th Street and speed off in a convertible. Curious, she investigates and discovers a dead man lying in a pool of blood. When the police arrive ten minutes later, they meet Miss Manton on the street below. Lt. Mike Brent (Sam Levene) and his men have a difficult time believing Manton's story - for one thing, she is dressed as Little Bo Peep under her overcoat, having just come from a costume party, and more importantly, the body has disappeared without a trace. Newspaper editor Peter Ames (Henry Fonda) sees this latest incident as another in a series of pranks that Manton and her debutante girlfriends pull to gain publicity (in the name of charity). Melsa goes to Ames' office, slaps him, and announces her intention to sue the paper for libel. To the bemusement and irritation of her maid Hilda (Hattie McDaniel), Melsa and her seven society girlfriends ignore anonymous threats while investigating the murder, dragging Ames into the proceedings as well. Barbara Stanwyck became involved in the RKO semi-screwball comedy when Katherine Hepburn turned it down. Hepburn had already appeared in an RKO comedy earlier the same year, in Howard Hawks' Bringing Up Baby (1938). That film didn't exactly set the box-office on fire, so Hepburn was not anxious to make a follow-up. Stanwyck, who was on suspension at RKO and in need of a film assignment at the time, inherited the role. For the male lead, Henry Fonda was borrowed from Walter Wanger Productions. As Axel Madsin wrote in his biography Stanwyck, Fonda "...hated his role, hated the script's sneering repartee with his leading lady, and tried his best to ignore everybody." Fonda himself later said, "I was so mad on this picture - I resented it." The script, written by Philip G. Epstein from an unpublished novel by Wilson Collison, is clearly meant as a female star vehicle, and Fonda probably did not appreciate the scenes in which he was beaten up by eight flighty debutantes! Director Leigh Jason keeps the comedy elements of The Mad Miss Manton sprightly, but he is also willing to let the mystery angle have some bite. The cinematography by Nicholas Musuraca (who was to later help define the look of Film Noir in Out of the Past - 1947), is appropriately dark and ominous during the menacing scenes. Jason also had a large cast to contend with; as Ella Smith writes in Starring Miss Barbara Stanwyck, "...the picture was an exercise in group directing. There were seven lively girls surrounding Stanwyck, and most of them - except for Frances Mercer, who played the largest of the roles - had never been before a camera...it was a challenge just to keep them straight. There was a temptation to put numbers on their backs, but Jason resisted and gave them bits of business that would keep them in the scene." Indeed, one of the socialites is forever finding something to eat, thinking nothing of eating a sandwich in a kitchen in which a corpse has just fallen from an icebox. Another of the debutantes, Dora, is forever politically-minded; in one scene Melsa is attempting to have the girls split up to search a house. She assigns Helen to go upstairs, upon which Helen replies, "Oh, no! I was never much of an individualist. If the upstairs has to be searched, we'll search it together." At this, Dora says, "Why, that's communism!" Filming on The Mad Miss Manton was sometimes a trying experience. Exteriors of New York City were shot on the Columbia Ranch in Burbank, California in mid-summer, forcing the debutantes to run around in fur stoles in 100-degree heat. There was also a one-week shutdown of production when Stanwyck took ill. Director Jason had the highest regard for his leading lady though; he was later quoted as saying, "I've worked with perhaps eight or nine hundred actors and actresses. Barbara Stanwyck is the nicest." In 1938, African-American character actress Hattie McDaniel was only one year away from her signature role as Mammy in Gone with the Wind (1939). In The Mad Miss Manton she plays Hilda, the house servant to the title character, but she is not exactly the subservient type: in fact, she gets in several great lines making fun of the flighty debutantes. At one point, Miss Manton mildly berates Hilda for being rude to one of her guests; "I didn't ask her up" is Hilda's reply. One of the socialites says, "Comes the revolution, and we'll start being exploited by our help." Melsa shoots a glance at Hilda and says, "In my home, the revolution is here." A few eyebrows were raised when Hilda, on standing orders from Melsa, tosses water in the face of Peter Ames when he shows up at the door. Hilda approves of him as a suitor though, and says, "It was orders. But I used distilled water!" No doubt such memorable supporting roles as the one she played in The Mad Miss Manton helped Hattie McDaniel win the Oscar® the following year. Producer: P. J. Wolfson Director: Leigh Jason Screenplay: Philip G. Epstein, Story by Wilson Collison Cinematography: Nicholas Musuraca Film Editing: George Hively Art Direction: Van Nest Polglase Music: Roy Webb Costume Design: Edward Stevenson Cast: Barbara Stanwyck (Melsa Manton), Henry Fonda (Peter Ames), Sam Levene (Lieutenant Mike Brent), Frances Mercer (Helen Frayne), Stanley Ridges (Edward 'Eddie' Norris), Whitney Bourne (Pat James), Vickie Lester (Kit Beverly), Ann Evers (Lee Wilson), Catherine O'Quinn (Dora Fenton), Hattie McDaniel (Hilda). BW-80m. by John M. Miller

Quotes

Look, lady, it's been ten minutes since you called us. The murderer, that is if there is a murderer, could be in Brooklyn by now - that is, if anybody *wants* to be in in Brooklyn.
- Lt. Mike Brent
Helen, you search the upstairs.
- Melsa Manton
Oh, no! I was never much of an individualist. If the upstairs has to be searched, we'll search it together.
- Helen Frayne
Why, that's communism!
- Dora Fenton
You know, psychiatrists say hate's just a step away from love.
- Dora Fenton
Yeah, but it's the lull in between that drives you crazy.
- Helen Frayne
You're up to your beautiful hips in murder!
- Peter Ames

Trivia

Notes

Screen Achievements Bulletin lists Wilson Collison's story as an "unpublished novel." According to 1937 Hollywood Reporter news items, Irene Dunne and Katharine Hepburn were first considered for the lead in this picture. Henry Fonda, who acted with Barbara Stanwyck for the first time in the production, was borrowed from Walter Wanger, to whom he was under contract. Stanwyck and Fonda made only two other films together, The Lady Eve and You Belong to Me, both 1941. According to modern sources, Stanwyck, who had been on suspension from RKO, made this film to fulfill requirements in her non-exclusive contract. RKO production files indicate that shooting was halted for one week in late July 1938 after Stanwyck became ill. Production files also note that the exterior New York scenes were shot at the Columbia Ranch in Burbank, CA. Although modern sources claim that Frances Mercer was the only actress among the other "pranksters" who had acted in films before, all but two of the "debs" (Catherine O'Quinn and Linda Terry) had prior film experience.