Lover Come Back


1h 47m 1961
Lover Come Back

Brief Synopsis

An ad exec in disguise courts his pretty female competitor.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Release Date
Jan 1961
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 20 Dec 1961
Production Company
7 Pictures; Arwin Productions, Inc.; Nob Hill Productions
Distribution Company
Universal-International
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 47m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

Though they have never met, Jerry Webster and Carol Templeton, account executives with rival advertising agencies, are sworn enemies. Jerry's practice of using liquor and chorus girls to land clients galls the hard-working and conscientious Carol. When she reports him to the Advertising Council, Jerry induces Rebel Davis, a sexy nightclub performer he uses to charm his prospective clients, to testify on his behalf. As a reward for helping him win an acquittal, Jerry names Rebel the VIP girl and films a series of commercials for a nonexistent product. Unfortunately, Jerry's boss, a hopeless neurotic named Peter Ramsey who is apron-stringed to his analyst, puts the commercials on television--and VIP is launched.

Frantic, Jerry engages an eccentric scientist, Dr. Linus Tyler, to invent a product that can be marketed as VIP. Carol visits Linus in an attempt to steal the account away from Jerry. When she arrives at his laboratory, she encounters Jerry, mistakes him for Linus, and announces that she will stop at nothing to get the account. Delighted by both the attractiveness of his rival and the chance to ruin her, Jerry pretends to be the scientist and allows Carol to wine and dine him. Just as he is about to complete his triumph by seducing Carol, she learns the truth. Appalled, she once more reports him to the Advertising Council, this time for advertising a nonexistent product. Jerry, however, arrives at the hearing with VIP, a mint-flavored candy he offers to one and all, including Carol. There is only one drawback: each one of Linus' wafers has the same effect as three triple martinis.

The next morning, Jerry and Carol wake up in a motel with a marriage certificate hanging on the mirror. The horrified Carol has the marriage quickly annulled while Jerry flees to his firm's west coast branch. They are reunited and remarried 9 months later, however--in a hospital maternity ward.

Photo Collections

Lover Come Back - Academy Archives
Here are archive images from Lover Come Back (1961), courtesy of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Videos

Movie Clip

Lover Come Back (1961) - It Looks Down On Madison Avenue Carol (Doris Day) has forced a hearing before the Madison Avenue ethics-enforcing “Advertising Council,” not knowing that her target, Jerry Webster (Rock Hudson, not seen) has tricked her witness, dishy model Rebel (Edie Adams) into hiding his dubious practices, in Lover Come Back, 1961.
Lover Come Back (1961) - I Wish I Were A Man Right Now! Ad man Jerry (Rock Hudson) is managing his neurotic boss and buddy Peter (Tony Randall), legacy owner of the agency, who's worried that competitor Carol (Doris Day) has filed a complaint, director Delbert Mann using the split-screen phone gimmick from Pillow Talk, 1959, early in Lover Come Back, 1961.
Lover Come Back (1961) - Until I See Him Sober Nearly 45 minutes into the movie, the stars on screen together for the firs time, Doris Day as ad-gal Carol reasonably presumes that bearded Rock Hudson, playing her rival Jerry, is actually the chemist Tyler, inventor of the so-far non-existent product “VIP,” implications abounding, in Lover Come Back, 1961.
Lover Come Back (1961) - Open, Title Song The leading lady delivers the bouncy title song by Frank De Vol and Alan Spilton, resonant early 1960's graphics, opening director Delbert Mann's much-praised romantic comedy Lover Come Back, 1961, starring Doris Day, Rock Hudson and Tony Randall.
Lover Come Back (1961) - Looks Like A Rough Day Director Delbert Mann's opening, introducing Doris Day, and later her aide Ann B. Davis, and rival Madison Avenue ad man Jerry (Rock Hudson), with an uncredited companion, then assistant Karen Norris, and a new contract up for grabs, in Lover Come Back, 1961.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Release Date
Jan 1961
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 20 Dec 1961
Production Company
7 Pictures; Arwin Productions, Inc.; Nob Hill Productions
Distribution Company
Universal-International
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 47m
Sound
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Writing, Screenplay

1962

Articles

Lover Come Back


The second - and for most critics, the best - of the three sex comedies Doris Day and Rock Hudson made together, Lover Come Back (1961) is also a sly and pointed satire of the advertising game as it was played in mid-century America. Taking off from the same winning formula as the first, hugely successful Day-Hudson pairing, Pillow Talk (1959), Lover Come Back pits Doris's virginal career girl against Rock's devious ad executive as they battle it out for a big account. They've never met, but she hates him by reputation alone; they meet, and she mistakes him for someone else, a scientist who is creating a new product called VIP. The attraction is mutual, and the complications are many and calamitous before she finally makes an honest man of him. As in Pillow Talk, Tony Randall is once again on hand as the couple's droll, neurotic foil.

During the 1950s, Day was typecast as the sunny, musical girl-next-door with a flair for comedy. Hudson, the hunky, stalwart leading man of glossy Universal melodramas, had never played comedy, and initially resisted when producer Ross Hunter offered him Pillow Talk. Hunter and Day convinced Hudson he could do it by telling him the first rule of comedy: it never works to try to be funny - you have to play it perfectly seriously. After that, Hudson said, it was just a question of following Day's lead. "Her sense of timing, her instincts - I just kept my eyes open and copied her....Doris...was an Actor's Studio all by herself. When she cried, she cried funny...and when she laughed, her laughter came boiling up from her kneecaps." The two had immediate rapport, and chemistry to burn. Audiences loved them together, and their re-teaming, along with Randall, was inevitable.

By 1961, advertising was a glamorous, sexy profession, ripe for satire, and Lover Come Back delivered the goods. Stanley Shapiro, who had co-written Pillow Talk, once again collaborated on a scintillating screenplay which had critics comparing Lover Come Back to the great screwball comedies of the 1930s. Bosley Crowther of the New York Times praised the script, saying it "has some of the sharpest and funniest situations you could wish, and some of the fastest, wittiest dialogue that has spewed out of a comedy in years." Most of the other reviews were also raves and Shapiro, who had won an Academy Award for Pillow Talk, was nominated again for Lover Come Back.

Although it seems tame by today's standards, Lover Come Back was considered very risque at the time. Doris Day, who really was the "good girl" that she played so often, went along with the fun, as long as it didn't cross over into what she considered vulgarity. For a scene in which she and Hudson get drunk and end up in bed together, she insisted that it be made clear that during their drunken bender, they've gone to a justice of the peace and gotten married...just like in those '30s screwball comedies.

Day and Hudson would make one more film together, Send Me No Flowers (1964), and would remain friends until Hudson's death in 1985. One of his last public appearances was at a benefit for one of Day's animal causes.

Producer: Stanley Shapiro, Martin Melcher
Director: Delbert Mann
Screenplay: Stanley Shapiro, Paul Henning
Editor: Marjorie Fowler
Cinematography: Arthur E. Arling
Costume Design: Irene
Art Direction: Alexander Golitzen, Robert Clatworthy
Music: Frank DeVol
Principal Cast: Rock Hudson (Jerry Webster), Doris Day (Carol Templeton), Tony Randall (Peter Ramsey), Edie Adams (Rebel Davis), Jack Oakie (J. Paxton Miller), Jack Kruschen (Dr. Linus Tyler), Ann B. Davis (Millie), Jack Albertson (Fred), Donna Douglas (Deborah), Joe Flynn (Hadley), Howard St. John (Mr. John Brackett).
C-107m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Margarita Landazuri
Lover Come Back

Lover Come Back

The second - and for most critics, the best - of the three sex comedies Doris Day and Rock Hudson made together, Lover Come Back (1961) is also a sly and pointed satire of the advertising game as it was played in mid-century America. Taking off from the same winning formula as the first, hugely successful Day-Hudson pairing, Pillow Talk (1959), Lover Come Back pits Doris's virginal career girl against Rock's devious ad executive as they battle it out for a big account. They've never met, but she hates him by reputation alone; they meet, and she mistakes him for someone else, a scientist who is creating a new product called VIP. The attraction is mutual, and the complications are many and calamitous before she finally makes an honest man of him. As in Pillow Talk, Tony Randall is once again on hand as the couple's droll, neurotic foil. During the 1950s, Day was typecast as the sunny, musical girl-next-door with a flair for comedy. Hudson, the hunky, stalwart leading man of glossy Universal melodramas, had never played comedy, and initially resisted when producer Ross Hunter offered him Pillow Talk. Hunter and Day convinced Hudson he could do it by telling him the first rule of comedy: it never works to try to be funny - you have to play it perfectly seriously. After that, Hudson said, it was just a question of following Day's lead. "Her sense of timing, her instincts - I just kept my eyes open and copied her....Doris...was an Actor's Studio all by herself. When she cried, she cried funny...and when she laughed, her laughter came boiling up from her kneecaps." The two had immediate rapport, and chemistry to burn. Audiences loved them together, and their re-teaming, along with Randall, was inevitable. By 1961, advertising was a glamorous, sexy profession, ripe for satire, and Lover Come Back delivered the goods. Stanley Shapiro, who had co-written Pillow Talk, once again collaborated on a scintillating screenplay which had critics comparing Lover Come Back to the great screwball comedies of the 1930s. Bosley Crowther of the New York Times praised the script, saying it "has some of the sharpest and funniest situations you could wish, and some of the fastest, wittiest dialogue that has spewed out of a comedy in years." Most of the other reviews were also raves and Shapiro, who had won an Academy Award for Pillow Talk, was nominated again for Lover Come Back. Although it seems tame by today's standards, Lover Come Back was considered very risque at the time. Doris Day, who really was the "good girl" that she played so often, went along with the fun, as long as it didn't cross over into what she considered vulgarity. For a scene in which she and Hudson get drunk and end up in bed together, she insisted that it be made clear that during their drunken bender, they've gone to a justice of the peace and gotten married...just like in those '30s screwball comedies. Day and Hudson would make one more film together, Send Me No Flowers (1964), and would remain friends until Hudson's death in 1985. One of his last public appearances was at a benefit for one of Day's animal causes. Producer: Stanley Shapiro, Martin Melcher Director: Delbert Mann Screenplay: Stanley Shapiro, Paul Henning Editor: Marjorie Fowler Cinematography: Arthur E. Arling Costume Design: Irene Art Direction: Alexander Golitzen, Robert Clatworthy Music: Frank DeVol Principal Cast: Rock Hudson (Jerry Webster), Doris Day (Carol Templeton), Tony Randall (Peter Ramsey), Edie Adams (Rebel Davis), Jack Oakie (J. Paxton Miller), Jack Kruschen (Dr. Linus Tyler), Ann B. Davis (Millie), Jack Albertson (Fred), Donna Douglas (Deborah), Joe Flynn (Hadley), Howard St. John (Mr. John Brackett). C-107m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Margarita Landazuri

Quotes

You kissed me and I was thrilled!
- Carol Templeton
A kiss? What does that prove? It's like finding out you can light a stove. It doesn't make you a cook.
- Jerry Webster
Okay, so I've sewn a few wild oats.
- Jerry Webster
A few? You could qualify for a farm loan!
- Carol Templeton

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted One of the Year's Ten Best Films by the 1962 New York Times Film Critics.

Released in United States 1961

Released in United States 1961