Love That Brute


1h 25m 1950

Brief Synopsis

In 1928, Big Ed Hanley (Paul Douglas), boss of a gang of Chicago racketeers, has money and power, but he is bored. Watching some kids play in the park, he sees Ruth Manning (Jean Peters) and is interested at once. He tells her he has a couple of kids and gives her the job of taking care of them. He moves Mamie (Joan Davis) in as a housekeeper, but the best he can scrape up as a son is Harry, a pint-sized monster. A couple of henchmen sent by to rub Big Ed out by his rival, Pretty Willie (Cesar Romero), are relieved of their hardware by Quentin (Arthur Treacher), Ed's butler, and Bugs, his right-hand man. They march them downstairs, supposedly to drop in the river, but actually leave them in a very nice jail maintained by Ed for gangsters who drop by to rub him out. Ed's problems include keeping Ruth, who has begun to like him, from finding out about his activities, increasing his family and keeping uninvited guests from dropping by.

Film Details

Also Known As
Turned up Toes, X Marks the Spot
Release Date
Jun 1950
Premiere Information
New York opening: 26 May 1950
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--St. John's Military Academy, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,634ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

After two Chicago gangsters shoot a cigar store owner in a Christmas, 1928 shakedown and are shot by him, Bugs Welch, mobster Big Ed Hanley's top henchman, rushes in and plants a single white carnation on each of the corpses. Bugs expects that the flowers will indicate to the police that Ed, who always leaves white carnations at the scenes of his crimes, is claiming credit for the killings when, in fact, he had nothing to do with them. The police find Ed feeding ducks in a park and discover that he has an alibi for the time of the killings. A short while later, Ed and Bugs encounter Ruth Manning, a young lady who has come from a small town in Michigan to look for work as a singer but is currently employed by the Playtime Supervision Agency as a children's governess. Ed, who feels that there is something missing in his life, thinks she has "a lot of class" and, wanting to have her around, lies to her that he is a widower with young sons. He offers her a job, tripling her salary, and arranges for her to come to see the children on Christmas Eve. Bugs is given the task of rounding up some boys to audition as his "sons," while at his Paradise Club Ed enlists dancer Mamie Sage for the role of his housekeeper. The only boy Bugs can find is the tough-talking Detroit Harry, Jr., the orphaned son of a gangster, who lives with an alcoholic aunt. When Ruth comes a day early, Ed is forced to introduce Harry as one of his sons and tells her that the other son, "George," is spending Christmas with his grandmother. Although Harry frightens Ruth a little, she agrees to take the job after he tells her he is in the trucking business. On Christmas Eve, two of rival gangster Pretty Willie Wetzchahofsky's men are caught climbing over Ed's wall. They are dispatched to the basement, where Ed is holding, in a large cell complete with a pool table, all the mugs he has allegedly "bumped off." Ed has never killed anyone but wants to project the image of being a really tough gangster. Ed gives Ruth a fur coat for Christmas but she refuses it and starts to pack. Ed apologizes and convinces her to stay on until they can get Harry into a new school. On Christmas Day, Pretty Willie, accompanied by two of his thugs, comes to Ed's house looking for his men. After Ed and Pretty Willie adjourn to the library, Ruth wants to call the police, but Mamie dissuades her by revealing who Ed really is. Ruth is appalled but Harry is thrilled that his "dad" is Big Ed Hanley. Ed and Pretty Willie agree to a truce, whereby Pretty Willie will control mob activities north of the river and Ed will run the south side. Later, Ruth tells Ed he is despicable, and Harry "spills the beans" that he is not really Ed's son. However, Ruth stays without pay until they manage to enroll Harry in a military academy. Afterward, Ed offers to give Ruth a job as a singer at his club, but she refuses, advising him to become the decent man he could be. Ruth stays in Chicago and makes the rounds of theatrical agents. One day, an agent shows her a newspaper story announcing that Ed has sold the Paradise Club, so she feels safe in accepting an engagement there. Her opening night, which is attended by Ed and Pretty Willie, is a big success, and Ed asks her to meet him later. However, Pretty Willie, who is also interested in Ruth, visits her dressing room and tells her that the "sale" was just a ruse to get her to work there and that Ed still owns the club. To prove to Ruth Ed's continued involvement in criminal activities, Pretty Willie asks him if the party to celebrate their truce is still on for later that evening, and Ruth again rebuffs Ed. In the meantime, Mamie who thinks her gangster husband Biff has been "bumped off," announces that she has remarried, unaware that Biff is actually among the inhabitants of Ed's basement. Later, Ruth shows up at the party with news that Harry is missing from the school. Harry is soon found in Ed's kitchen, having been caught running a protection racket in the school, and says he will not return there. Bugs tells Ruth that Ed has never hurt anyone in his life and shows her the collection of a dozen "victims" in the basement cell. When one of the prisoners removes the cell door key from Bugs's pocket, they all escape to the party upstairs, where they scare everyone and cause Mamie to passout. Disappointed that Ed is not the "tough guy" he thought he was, Pretty Willie cancels their business relationship and takes Ed for "a ride" in the country, where he assigns Puggie and Louie, two of Ed's former prisoners, to "bump him off." Puggie and Louie, however, fake Ed's death as he did theirs. Ed then finds the terrified Bugs and asks him to go to the morgue and identify an unrecognizable, mangled body as his, then plant some of Ed's possessions on the body and set up Pretty Willie as his killer. Suspicion does fall on Pretty Willie, who is busy organizing the funeral of his former associate. Ruth and Harry are watching the funeral procession when Ed surprises them. Ruth tells Ed that she was going to miss him for the rest of her life and, although Ed will be broke, they decide to spend their lives together. Ed arranges for them to meet later that night and board a ship for Canada. First, however, Ed arranges for Puggie and Louie to tell the district attorney that Pretty Willie killed him. En route to the prison where he will be held until his trial, Pretty Willie is confronted by Ed in a washroom and almost has a heart attack. Not having seen Ed, the detective who is with Pretty Willie thinks he is going insane. Ed then joins Ruth, Harry and Bugs on the ship, where the captain will perform the wedding ceremony.

Cast

Paul Douglas

Big Editor Hanley

Jean Peters

Ruth Manning

Cesar Romero

Pretty Willie Wetzchahofsky

Keenan Wynn

Bugs Welch

Joan Davis

Mamie Sage

Arthur Treacher

Quentin

Peter Price

Detroit Harry, Jr.

Jay C. Flippen

Biff Sage

Barry Kelley

Burly detective

Leon Belasco

Ducray

Edwin Max

Puggie

Sid Tomack

Louie

Kenneth Tobey

Gunman

Jack Elam

Gunman

Phil Tully

Detective lieutenant

Clara Blandick

Landlady

Jimmy Hawkins

Freddie Van Zandt

Judith Ann Vroom

Gwendolyn

Bill Chaney

Newsboy

Dan Riss

District Attorney

Tiny Timbrell

Santa Claus

Charles Lane

Cigar store owner

Frank "billy" Mitchell

Bootblack

Marion Marshall

Dawn O'Day

Sid Marion

Bartender

Charles Evans

Governor Logan

Leif Erickson

Military school commandant

Mauritz Hugo

Purser

Alan Wells

Gangster

Ott George

Gangster

John Marshall

Gangster

Dick Wessel

Gangster

John Doucette

Gangster

Frank Richards

Gangster

Joe Gray

Gangster

David Newell

Policeman

Jack Daley

Policeman

Charles Flynn

Policeman

Paul "tiny" Newlan

Policeman

Mary Meade

Blonde in park

Robert Gist

Rookie policeman

Robert Foulk

Delivery man

Frank Kreig

Delivery man

Robert Williams

Waiter

Arthur O'connell

Reporter

Eugene Gericke

Reporter

Don Garner

Page boy

Grayce Hampton

Ship passenger

Loren Raker

Steward

Joe Recht

Bellboy

Charles B. Smith

Receptionist

Lester Allen

Agent

Virginia Dale

Maid

Paula Hill

Maid

Rodney Bell

Mug

Richard Karlan

Mug

Henry Kulky

Mug

Ben Moselle

Mug

Nedrick Young

Mug

Ann Corcoran

Moll

Cay Forester

Moll

Laurette Luez

Moll

Torchy Rand

Moll

Susan Scott

Moll

Gail Bonney

Dorothy Neumann

Film Details

Also Known As
Turned up Toes, X Marks the Spot
Release Date
Jun 1950
Premiere Information
New York opening: 26 May 1950
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--St. John's Military Academy, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,634ft (9 reels)

Articles

Kenneth Tobey (1917-2003)


Kenneth Tobey, the sandy-haired, tough-looking American character actor who appeared in over 100 films, but is best remembered as Captain Patrick Hendry in the Sci-Fi classic, The Thing From Another World (1951), died on December 22nd of natural causes at a hospital in Rancho Mirage, California. He was 86.

Born in Oakland, California on March 23, 1917, Tobey originally intended to be a lawyer before a stint with the University of California Little Theater changed his mind. From there, he went straight to New York and spent nearly two years studying acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse, where his classmates included Gregory Peck, Eli Wallach and Tony Randall. Throughout the '40s, Tobey acted on Broadway and in stock before relocating to Hollywood. Once there, Tobey soon found himself playing a tough soldier in films like I Was a Male War Bride and Twelve O' Clock High (both 1949); or a tough police officer in Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye and Three Secrets (both 1950). Such roles were hardly surprising, given Tobey's craggy features, unsmiling countenance and rough voice.

Needless to say, no-nonsense, authority figures would be Tobey's calling for the remainder of his career; yet given the right role, he had the talent to make it memorable: the smart, likeable Captain Hendrey in The Thing From Another World (1951); the gallant Colonel Jack Evans in the "prehistoric dinosaur attacks an urban center" genre chiller The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953, a must-see film for fans of special effects wizard, Ray Harryhausen; and as Bat Masterson, holding his own against Kirk Douglas and Burt Lancaster in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957).

Television would also offer Tobey much work: he had his own action series as chopper pilot Chuck Martin in Whirlybirds (1957-59); and had a recurring role as Assistant District Attorney Alvin in Perry Mason (1957-66). He would also be kept busy with guest appearances in countless westerns (Gunsmoke, Bonanza, The Virginian) and cop shows (The Rockford Files, Barnaby Jones, Ironside) for the next two decades. Most amusingly, the tail end of Tobey's career saw some self-deprecating cameo spots in such contemporary shockers as The Howling (1981); Strange Invaders (1983) and his role reprisal of Captain Hendry in The Attack of the B-Movie Monsters (2002). Tobey is survived by a daughter, two stepchildren, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Kenneth Tobey (1917-2003)

Kenneth Tobey (1917-2003)

Kenneth Tobey, the sandy-haired, tough-looking American character actor who appeared in over 100 films, but is best remembered as Captain Patrick Hendry in the Sci-Fi classic, The Thing From Another World (1951), died on December 22nd of natural causes at a hospital in Rancho Mirage, California. He was 86. Born in Oakland, California on March 23, 1917, Tobey originally intended to be a lawyer before a stint with the University of California Little Theater changed his mind. From there, he went straight to New York and spent nearly two years studying acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse, where his classmates included Gregory Peck, Eli Wallach and Tony Randall. Throughout the '40s, Tobey acted on Broadway and in stock before relocating to Hollywood. Once there, Tobey soon found himself playing a tough soldier in films like I Was a Male War Bride and Twelve O' Clock High (both 1949); or a tough police officer in Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye and Three Secrets (both 1950). Such roles were hardly surprising, given Tobey's craggy features, unsmiling countenance and rough voice. Needless to say, no-nonsense, authority figures would be Tobey's calling for the remainder of his career; yet given the right role, he had the talent to make it memorable: the smart, likeable Captain Hendrey in The Thing From Another World (1951); the gallant Colonel Jack Evans in the "prehistoric dinosaur attacks an urban center" genre chiller The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953, a must-see film for fans of special effects wizard, Ray Harryhausen; and as Bat Masterson, holding his own against Kirk Douglas and Burt Lancaster in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957). Television would also offer Tobey much work: he had his own action series as chopper pilot Chuck Martin in Whirlybirds (1957-59); and had a recurring role as Assistant District Attorney Alvin in Perry Mason (1957-66). He would also be kept busy with guest appearances in countless westerns (Gunsmoke, Bonanza, The Virginian) and cop shows (The Rockford Files, Barnaby Jones, Ironside) for the next two decades. Most amusingly, the tail end of Tobey's career saw some self-deprecating cameo spots in such contemporary shockers as The Howling (1981); Strange Invaders (1983) and his role reprisal of Captain Hendry in The Attack of the B-Movie Monsters (2002). Tobey is survived by a daughter, two stepchildren, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Love That Brute was a remake of the 1941 Twentieth Century-Fox film Tall, Dark and Handsome . Documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection and the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, add the following information about the production: John Lee Mahin wrote an adaptation, titled X Marks the Spot, of the Karl Tunberg and Darrell Ware original screenplay for Tall, Dark and Handsome. Mahin's screenplay was retitled Turned Up Toes and was shot under that title in the summer of 1949. Richard Basehart was suggested by studio chief Darryl F. Zanuck as a possibility for the "Pretty Willie" role, which eventually went to Cesar Romero, who had played the "Big Ed Hanley" character in the 1941 film, which featured Sheldon Leonard as "Pretty Willie." Leon Belasco played the same role in both films.
       St. John's Military Academy in Los Angeles was used as a location for the school in the picture. A radio adaptation of the film, also featuring Paul Douglas and Jean Peters, was broadcast on the Lux Radio Theatre on October 9, 1950. CBCS lists Stan Johnson and Tom Greenway as cast members but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.