Love Is News


1h 18m 1937

Film Details

Release Date
Feb 26, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 18m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,999ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

After Martin J. Canavan is appointed city editor of the New York Daily Express , rival reporter Steve Leyton quits. When a hot tip comes in that the multi-millionaire tin-can heiress, Tony Gateson, will be landing shortly at the Newark airport, Marty accepts a sock in the jaw from Steve and tricks him into covering the story. At the airport, Steve gains Tony's confidence after posing as the leader of a special police detail to help her and learns that she has broken with her fiancé, Count Andre de Guyon, whom she calls a "blue-blooded moron." When Tony learns Steve's identity and he refuses to kill the story about the breakup, she announces to the other reporters that she and Steve have become engaged, so that he will experience what it feels like to be a "public freak." Marty fires Steve, who is hounded by autograph-seekers and a horde of salemen. Tony then agrees to meet him for lunch to discuss the situation. Steve brings Marty to prove that the story is not true, but Tony kisses Steve passionately so that photographers from the other papers can get pictures of them. Steve follows Tony into the country, where she is arrested for speeding and reckless driving. After learning that Steve has convinced the judge to sentence her to thirty days, Tony sends him on an errand to her car and then has him arrested for trying to rob it. She tells the other reporters that "Stevekins" had himself thrown in jail to be near her. The next day, after she is released and pays Steve's fine, she tries to attract his attention by faking an accident in her car. Steve, however, carries her from the car and drops her in a pool of mud. Later, when Tony tells Steve that she plans to "jilt" him to create more headlines and humiliation for him, Steve says that he is glad because it will help publicize the vaudeville act he plans to do to recreate their "romance." Horrified, Tony refuses to jilt him, and Steve impulsively kisses her passionately, which causes them both to realize that their charade has gone too far. Tony agrees to call off the engagement quickly and quietly and to give Marty the exclusive story the next morning. The next day, after Tony has not shown up, Steve bets Marty a sock on the jaw that she will appear by 10:15. However, Tony, having learned that her friend, Lois Westcott, is about to marry the count, rushes to city hall to stop them. She convinces the count that she still loves him and at 10:15, as Marty socks Steve, calls the Daily Express with the story that she will marry the count. After the call, Steve demands repayment and socks Marty back. At city hall, after the count tells Lois about his change in wedding plans, Tony admits that she was only pretending so she could reveal to Lois that the count is really a cad. Tony goes to see Steve and, when she finds him rehearsing a scene from the vaudeville act, calls him despicable. She confides in her wealthy uncle, Cyrus Jeffrey, who has liked Steve all along, and Cyrus, without her knowledge, buys a half interest in the newspaper with the condition that Steve be made managing editor. When Marty learns that Steve is now his boss, he demands to be taken off the payroll. In the midst of their argument, the count arrives and offers ten of Tony's love letters for $10,000. Tony arrives and offers the count $25,000 for them, but Steve keeps them stating that he and the count already made a deal. Tony leaves upset and Marty socks the count, while Steve puts a box marked "Gateson letters" into a safe. Publisher J. D. Jones then demands the letters and reveals that Cyrus is half owner of the paper. Steve quits, thinking that Tony got him his new position. When the box is opened and Tony sees that Steve has destroyed the letters, she tearfully voes to "eat crow." She chases Steve into a drugstore pay phone, demanding an interview and asking questions such as, "Don't you think Tony Gateson is a human being" and "When are you going to act like one yourself?" Steve calls Marty, and as Marty listens and a crowd watching from outside cheers, Steve kisses Tony.

Cast

Tyrone Power

Steve Leyton

Loretta Young

Tony Gateson

Don Ameche

Martin J. Canavan

Slim Summerville

Judge Hart

Dudley Digges

Cyrus Jeffrey

Walter Catlett

Eddie Johnson

Pauline Moore

Lois Westcott

Jane Darwell

Mrs. Flaherty

Stepin Fetchit

Penrod

George Sanders

Count Andre de Guyon

Elisha Cook Jr.

Egbert Eggleston

Frank Conroy

A. G. Findlay

Edwin Maxwell

Kenyon

Charles Williams

Joe Brady

Julius Tannen

Logan

George Humbert

Mike Allegretti

Frederick Burton

J. D. Jones

Charles Coleman

Bevins

Paul Mcvey

Alvord

Carol Tevis

Tessie

Ed Deering

Motorcycle officer

George Offerman Jr.

Copy boy

Art Dupuis

Tony's chauffeur

Charles Tannen

Reporter

Sidney Fields

Reporter

Arthur Rankin

Reporter

Jack Byron

Reporter

Sterling Campbell

Reporter

Dick French

Reporter

Paul Frawley

Reporter

Ray Johnson

Reporter

Al Jensen

Reporter

Richard Powell

Insurance salesman

Jack Mulhall

Yacht salesman

Sam Ash

Tailor

Harry Hayden

Salesman

Harry Depp

Salesman

Sherry Hall

Salesman

Charles King

Salesman

Emmett Vogan

Salesman

Gladden James

Salesman

Babe Green

Salesman

Paddy O'flynn

Salesman

Larry Steers

Salesman

Dorothy Christy

Boardinghouse beauty

Eddie Anderson

Black man at City Hall

Etta Mcdaniels

Black woman at City Hall

John Dilson

Clerk

Carlton E. Griffin

Desk man

Harry Watson

Newsboy

Mugsy Meyers

Gambler

Jack Baxley

Deputy

Joe Smith Marba

Carpenter

Pop Byron

Cop

Wade Boteler

Cop

Fred Kelsey

Cop

Bruce Mitchell

Cop

Eddy Chandler

Cop

Maidel Turner

Dowager

Herbert Ashley

Gateman

Alan Davis

Pilot

Lillian West

Maid in Tony's bathroom

Antonio Filauri

Headwaiter

Davidson Clark

Foreman of print shop

Edward Cooper

Butler

Lynn Bari

Secretary

Leonard Kibrick

Newsboy

Dot Farley

Film Details

Release Date
Feb 26, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 18m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,999ft (9 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to Variety, Warner Bros. originally bought the screen rights to the story in June 1936. According to Los Angeles Examiner, Darryl Zanuck, who wanted Tyrone Power to do light, romantic comedy, was unsure about his casting for the role of "Chico" in Seventh Heaven (see below), so he starred him in this film. Life speculated that this film would probably establish Power "as the leading contender for the romantic juvenile laurels now worn by Robert Taylor." The same Los Angeles Examiner news item stated that Otto Preminger would direct the film. New York Times reported that Loretta Young objected to Preminger as being "too foreign to direct such an American story," so Tay Garnett was switched from The Last Slaver, the working title for Slave Ship (see below), to this film. Garnett directed Slave Ship when this film was completed. Gavin Muir and Shirley Deane are listed as cast members in Hollywood Reporter production charts, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. A modern source states that this was Young's only picture in the 1930s to be a top ten moneymaker and that she was furious that Power was given top billing. Twentieth Century-Fox remade the film in 1948 as That Wonderful Urge, with Tyrone Power again and Gene Tierney, directed by Robert Sinclair. In 1943, Twentieth Century-Fox produced a film entitled Sweet Rosie O'Grady, which was taken from stories by Lipman, Stephani and Edward Van Every and bears some resemblance to this film. That film starred Betty Grable and Robert Young and was directed by Irving Cummings.